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View Poll Results: Where would you rather vacation?
Madrid 40 51.28%
Milan 9 11.54%
Toronto 9 11.54%
Sydney 20 25.64%
Voters: 78. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-29-2018, 08:50 PM
 
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Toronto doesn’t have anything as pretty as Sydney’s botanical garden. Hyde park is also gorgeous. The university of Sydney is also regarded as one of the most beautiful universities with its Sandstone Gothic buildings, it does feel like Hogwarts. I wasn’t amazed by Toronto at all, I did really like the waterfront although. But I found Ottawa and Montreal more beautiful and interesting. In fact if anyone is going to visit a city in Canada I would suggest to go to those cities instead Toronto. Quebec City is also gorgeous.
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Old 05-29-2018, 09:30 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 10,400,288 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cavsfan137 View Post
Then in between, you do have Cabbagetown and Distillery District which have a bit of a unique bent compared to even many European cities with the Victorian Residential and Industrial architecture, respectively. I think things have to be taken into a holistic perspective, and Toronto's modern aspects shine for a visitor too (in some ways, just as distinctively as European cities shine for their older aspects), and there's that diversity/cosmopolitanism you mention.


Toronto feels like a very organized, convenient city, even if not the most exciting, and there's a certain peace about the city given the size. I say for day to day stuff because Toronto would seem to get at least as many if not more major events and such as any of these other cities, and the outstanding theatre scene, and I must say, sports, at least for me (MLB, MLS, NHL, NBA).
One thing Toronto does shine in over the last 50 years is skyscraper architecture. You can find probably Van Der Rohe's greatest piece of work in the TD Centre. You want Durell Stone, I.M PEI, Daniel Libeskind, Will Alsop, Viljo Rivell, Frank Gehry, Sir Norman Foster and many more T.O has examples of them. Few cities actually have such a breadth of modern day architectural pedigree, but they aren't quite appreciated not as perhaps they will be in another 50 years.

T.O doesn't necessarily do one overarching unique style very well but it does a little bit of everything very well. It all depends on what an individual prefers. Toronto is also a larger city than other Canadian cities by a fairly wide margin so its attractions aren't as compact.

Oh since you are familiar with the city - another architectural style unique to it is the annex style house.

This area (the Annex) is close to the U of T grounds and in combination may be my favourite nabe in the entire city.
http://mirvishandgehrytoronto.com/in...x-style-house/

Last edited by fusion2; 05-29-2018 at 09:40 PM..
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Old 05-29-2018, 09:32 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 10,400,288 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by usuariodeldia View Post
Toronto doesn’t have anything as pretty as Sydney’s botanical garden. Hyde park is also gorgeous. The university of Sydney is also regarded as one of the most beautiful universities with its Sandstone Gothic buildings, it does feel like Hogwarts. I wasn’t amazed by Toronto at all, I did really like the waterfront although. But I found Ottawa and Montreal more beautiful and interesting. In fact if anyone is going to visit a city in Canada I would suggest to go to those cities instead Toronto. Quebec City is also gorgeous.
Ok I can take Montreal more interesting to visitors. I may not necessarily agree with it wholesale but Ottawa more interesting than Toronto LOL... I don't think any objective person could really come to that conclusion.

This street alone is more interesting and has more character and urban vibe than all of Ottawa
https://www.google.ca/maps/@43.65320...7i13312!8i6656

Ottawa has some nice architecture (namely the parliament buildings) and some ok museums (not as good as the ROM or AGO imo) - but overall it is a small and sterile city and is but a sliver of Toronto's urbanity and aside from a small area of decent architecture, is architecturally bereft compared to Old Toronto.

Last edited by fusion2; 05-29-2018 at 09:42 PM..
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Old 05-30-2018, 02:34 AM
 
137 posts, read 48,963 times
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Originally Posted by fusion2 View Post
Ok I can take Montreal more interesting to visitors. I may not necessarily agree with it wholesale but Ottawa more interesting than Toronto LOL... I don't think any objective person could really come to that conclusion.

This street alone is more interesting and has more character and urban vibe than all of Ottawa
https://www.google.ca/maps/@43.65320...7i13312!8i6656

Ottawa has some nice architecture (namely the parliament buildings) and some ok museums (not as good as the ROM or AGO imo) - but overall it is a small and sterile city and is but a sliver of Toronto's urbanity and aside from a small area of decent architecture, is architecturally bereft compared to Old Toronto.
I went to Kensington Ave, yeah it's cool but its just a street full of hipsters that you can see in any other major city; Newtown in Sydney, Mile End in Montreal, Shoreditch in London, Brooklyn in NYC, ETC ETC ETC. Ottawa is prettier than Toronto with the Capitol Hill, The Fairmont Château Laurier, and the canal. It is also bilingual, on par with Montreal, I went to a McDonalds (because it was -35C outside and needed somewhere to get warm) and the staff spoke in both French and English, in fact, everything is bilingual more than in Montreal where you see often only french signs. The Canadian Museum of history is awesome too.
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Old 05-30-2018, 03:29 AM
 
3,456 posts, read 2,558,503 times
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It does sound like you don't like you just aren't that big on Toronto (I don't mean that you hate it, just that you like many places better). I can't necessarily disagree with that but for me personally, I think we'll have to agree to disagree. Nothing wrong with those other places, but no place in Canada has as many high cultural events, sporting events/venues, sheer number of neighborhoods, diversity, major festivals (Caribana), theme parks, total number of attractions, as impressive or modern a skyline, dining scene etc. Nothing wrong with what your saying either, but I personally enjoy the modern and cosmopolitan features of Toronto, along with some pretty cool historical aesthetic in a number of places, just as much if not more at times as I enjoy the primarily historic features of the other cities, even within this elite quartet : ) It's good to have range of experiences, etc. I guess I see what you're saying about Ottawa having those pretty vistas, but the perk of a Toronto is it just seems like a much more expansive place. I could come up with numerous examples of impressive architecture in Toronto also, (Ex: as someone without a dog in the fight, the UToronto and USydney both look comparably very pretty), the Royal York is strikingly beautiful in Toronto, and I'm not sure there is a private residence for tour in Sydney or Montreal that quite matches up with for example Casa Loma. That's not to criticize the other places either, someone certainly could have a great time in Ottawa, and I could easily see someone being more impressed by Sydney and Toronto. Toronto by it's nature may not have quite as "dynamic" a feel, but walk around Cabbagetown and I think one would have a hard time describing it as not beautiful, just perhaps a more understated, not being heard above the buzz of the city, charm. Also, just the fact that area in Toronto mentioned (I believe it was ranked as world's second coolest neighborhood at one point), in the same group as Shoreditch and Brooklyn, certainly means it couldn't be found in EVERY city.


Edit: Very interesting article about the annex style house!
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Old 05-30-2018, 05:34 AM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 10,400,288 times
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Originally Posted by usuariodeldia View Post
I went to Kensington Ave, yeah it's cool but its just a street full of hipsters that you can see in any other major city; Newtown in Sydney, Mile End in Montreal, Shoreditch in London, Brooklyn in NYC, ETC ETC ETC. Ottawa is prettier than Toronto with the Capitol Hill, The Fairmont Château Laurier, and the canal. It is also bilingual, on par with Montreal, I went to a McDonalds (because it was -35C outside and needed somewhere to get warm) and the staff spoke in both French and English, in fact, everything is bilingual more than in Montreal where you see often only french signs. The Canadian Museum of history is awesome too.
Well 'prettier' is one thing. I was getting at more urban and interesting as a city and in that case, whether one is a fan of Toronto or not - I don't think anyone objectively can say Ottawa is more 'interesting' or more urban, it simply is not and doesn't have nearly as many offerings - One for example, may not be a fan of Victorian residential or industrial architecture so that may not be interesting to them, but if they do like various styles of that type - Ottawa isn't going to measure up at all. It is simply too small of a city and is kind of 'purpose' built as a national capital city. Sure other cities have hipster areas - not sure many have a variety of Victorian architecture like in Kensington. Kensington ave is one street in Kensington market which is a nabe actually. If you think of it - every city of a decent size has architectural styles, cuisine, entertainment, nabes, museums. Unique elements aren't necessarily so 'unique'

In any event - I get it. The city didn't really do anything for you. Oddly enough the area you pointed out that you enjoyed the most is really the least interesting part imo of Old Toronto (waterfront) lol..

Last edited by fusion2; 05-30-2018 at 06:01 AM..
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Old 05-30-2018, 05:54 AM
 
137 posts, read 48,963 times
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Originally Posted by cavsfan137 View Post
It does sound like you don't like you just aren't that big on Toronto (I don't mean that you hate it, just that you like many places better). I can't necessarily disagree with that but for me personally, I think we'll have to agree to disagree. Nothing wrong with those other places, but no place in Canada has as many high cultural events, sporting events/venues, sheer number of neighborhoods, diversity, major festivals (Caribana), theme parks, total number of attractions, as impressive or modern a skyline, dining scene etc. Nothing wrong with what your saying either, but I personally enjoy the modern and cosmopolitan features of Toronto, along with some pretty cool historical aesthetic in a number of places, just as much if not more at times as I enjoy the primarily historic features of the other cities, even within this elite quartet : ) It's good to have range of experiences, etc. I guess I see what you're saying about Ottawa having those pretty vistas, but the perk of a Toronto is it just seems like a much more expansive place. I could come up with numerous examples of impressive architecture in Toronto also, (Ex: as someone without a dog in the fight, the UToronto and USydney both look comparably very pretty), the Royal York is strikingly beautiful in Toronto, and I'm not sure there is a private residence for tour in Sydney or Montreal that quite matches up with for example Casa Loma. That's not to criticize the other places either, someone certainly could have a great time in Ottawa, and I could easily see someone being more impressed by Sydney and Toronto. Toronto by it's nature may not have quite as "dynamic" a feel, but walk around Cabbagetown and I think one would have a hard time describing it as not beautiful, just perhaps a more understated, not being heard above the buzz of the city, charm. Also, just the fact that area in Toronto mentioned (I believe it was ranked as world's second coolest neighborhood at one point), in the same group as Shoreditch and Brooklyn, certainly means it couldn't be found in EVERY city.


Edit: Very interesting article about the annex style house!
There is in Sydney, we have the Government house :

https://www.google.com.au/search?q=g...w=1353&bih=736

https://www.governor.nsw.gov.au/gove...r-information/
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Old 05-30-2018, 06:03 AM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 10,400,288 times
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Originally Posted by usuariodeldia View Post
Ahh you're from Sydney
Makes sense now lol
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Old 05-30-2018, 06:07 AM
 
137 posts, read 48,963 times
Reputation: 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by fusion2 View Post
Well 'prettier' is one thing. I was getting at more urban and interesting as a city and in that case, whether one is a fan of Toronto or not - I don't think anyone objectively can say Ottawa is more 'interesting' or more urban, it simply is not and doesn't have nearly as many offerings - One for example, may not be a fan of Victorian residential or industrial architecture so that may not be interesting to them, but if they do like various styles of that type - Ottawa isn't going to measure up at all. It is simply too small of a city and is kind of 'purpose' built as a national capital city. Sure other cities have hipster areas - not sure many have a variety of Victorian architecture like in Kensington. Kensington ave is one street in Kensington market which is a nabe actually. If you think of it - every city of a decent size has architectural styles, cuisine, entertainment, nabes, museums. Unique elements are necessarily so 'unique'

In any event - I get it. The city didn't really do anything for you. Oddly enough the area you pointed out that you enjoyed the most is really the least interesting part imo of Old Toronto (waterfront) lol..

Well, I find pretty interesting that it is a bilingual city, not many cities like that in the world. You would struggle a lot in Toronto if you were from Quebec and only speak French. I never said it was urbaner, can't compare Ottawa with a population of 1.2 million to Toronto with 6 million. I was just talking from a visitor perspective as we are debating which place to visit between Madrid, Milan, Toronto or Sydney. I just think that other Canadian cities (Montreal, Quebec and Ottawa) have more to offer in terms of tourist sights than Toronto . But hey, Australian and New Zealander cities (Melbourne, Auckland) are quite similar to Toronto, so that's why maybe I didn't see any novelty at all.
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Old 05-30-2018, 06:12 AM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 10,400,288 times
Reputation: 3716
Quote:
Originally Posted by cavsfan137 View Post
It does sound like you don't like you just aren't that big on Toronto (I don't mean that you hate it, just that you like many places better). I can't necessarily disagree with that but for me personally, I think we'll have to agree to disagree. Nothing wrong with those other places, but no place in Canada has as many high cultural events, sporting events/venues, sheer number of neighborhoods, diversity, major festivals (Caribana), theme parks, total number of attractions, as impressive or modern a skyline, dining scene etc. Nothing wrong with what your saying either, but I personally enjoy the modern and cosmopolitan features of Toronto, along with some pretty cool historical aesthetic in a number of places, just as much if not more at times as I enjoy the primarily historic features of the other cities, even within this elite quartet : ) It's good to have range of experiences, etc. I guess I see what you're saying about Ottawa having those pretty vistas, but the perk of a Toronto is it just seems like a much more expansive place. I could come up with numerous examples of impressive architecture in Toronto also, (Ex: as someone without a dog in the fight, the UToronto and USydney both look comparably very pretty), the Royal York is strikingly beautiful in Toronto, and I'm not sure there is a private residence for tour in Sydney or Montreal that quite matches up with for example Casa Loma. That's not to criticize the other places either, someone certainly could have a great time in Ottawa, and I could easily see someone being more impressed by Sydney and Toronto. Toronto by it's nature may not have quite as "dynamic" a feel, but walk around Cabbagetown and I think one would have a hard time describing it as not beautiful, just perhaps a more understated, not being heard above the buzz of the city, charm. Also, just the fact that area in Toronto mentioned (I believe it was ranked as world's second coolest neighborhood at one point), in the same group as Shoreditch and Brooklyn, certainly means it couldn't be found in EVERY city.


Edit: Very interesting article about the annex style house!
CavsFan - I think the truth is perhaps not everyone who has been to Toronto has 'been' to Toronto. They aren't as struck by it as maybe you are because as a visitor - especially a casual one they didn't have the time or inclination to explore it like you did. You are an explorer I see and i'm the same way when I go to a city. I try to go to more than just the obvious tourist places and actually explore the city. Toronto is one of those places that may not reward you instantly on the surface but does if you actually get out and walk the streets of it and I mean the streets of Old Toronto. Than you start to unravel the layers and interesting urban/architectural juxtapositions the city has. Istanbul is another city that does this for me. The more I go there the more I find.
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