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Old 05-12-2013, 04:26 PM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
20,493 posts, read 19,845,034 times
Reputation: 22516

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It was culture shock for me when I moved from the mountains of North Carolina to Fayetteville, N. C. I made the move in October and did not take one summer outfit with me. Some people were still wearing white shoes there. Nobody I knew would have been caught dead in a pair of white shoes after Labor Day. That is just one example. There were many.
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Old 05-12-2013, 05:08 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,624 posts, read 15,866,937 times
Reputation: 8772
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex =] View Post
The U.S. is not first world.

Canada, Australia, Japan, and some European countries are first world.

The Gini Index is horrible in the U.S.A. (Gap between rich and poor), public schools are being replaced by under-performing charter schools (for profit), SOCIAL security is not social (even though the goverment collects social security from you) and it does not include social healthcare, and the cities are not walk-able so people get very heavy.

The U.S. is second world.

Some U.S. cities are first world but that does not mean the entire country is first world.
Lol i think you need to get out more.
United States
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Old 05-12-2013, 08:30 PM
 
Location: Long Island, NY
797 posts, read 881,029 times
Reputation: 185
Of course. Language, culture, holidays and system is different.
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Old 05-13-2013, 08:27 PM
 
Location: NYC/D.C.
363 posts, read 511,079 times
Reputation: 205
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex =] View Post
The U.S. is not first world.

Canada, Australia, Japan, and some European countries are first world.

The Gini Index is horrible in the U.S.A. (Gap between rich and poor), public schools are being replaced by under-performing charter schools (for profit), SOCIAL security is not social (even though the goverment collects social security from you) and it does not include social healthcare, and the cities are not walk-able so people get very heavy.

The U.S. is second world.

Some U.S. cities are first world but that does not mean the entire country is first world.
Lol. Whatever you say buddy.
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Old 05-14-2013, 01:44 AM
 
Location: Miami, Florida
320 posts, read 404,741 times
Reputation: 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
Lol i think you need to get out more.
United States
From your own source:

"In the United States, the average person earns 37 708 USD a year, more than the OECD average of 22 387 USD a year. But there is a considerable gap between the richest and poorest – [b]the top 20% of the population earn approximately eight times as much as the bottom 20%."

" In the United States, the income of the top 20% of the population is 81 878 USD a year, whereas the bottom 20% live on 10591 USD a year."
----------------
20% of the U.S. population have third world annual salaries.
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"People in the United States work 1778 hours a year, more than most people in the OECD who work 1749 hours. Almost 11% of employees work very long hours, higher than the OECD average of 9%, with 15% of men working very long hours compared with just 6% for women."

"The wages and other monetary benefits that come with employment are an important aspect of job quality. In the United States, people earn 52 607 US dollars per year on average, much higher than the OECD average 34 033 US dollars. Not everyone earns that amount however. Whereas the top 20% of the population earn 109 508 US dollars per year, the bottom 20% live on 16 682 per year.
Another essential factor of employment quality is job security. Employees working on temporary contracts are more vulnerable than workers with an open-ended contract. In the United States, close to 11% of total employees have a contract of 6 months or less, slightly higher than the OECD-30 average of 10%. This figure suggests greater stabilisation of working contracts could be encouraged for US employees."

"The United States spent 7,538 USD on health per person in 2008, two-and-a-half times greater than the OECD average of 3,060 USD. Americans spent more than twice as much as relatively rich European countries such as France, Germany and the United Kingdom. The United States spends much more on health than any other OECD country on a per capita basis and as a share of GDP."

"Soaring obesity rates make the US the fattest country in the OECD. Overweight and obesity rates have increased steadily since the 1980s in both men and women. In the United States, the obesity rate among adults is of 33.8%. This is the highest rate among the 21 OECD countries with self-reported data, with an average of 14.9% in 2008. Three out of four people are projected by the OECD to be overweight or obese within 10 years. 40% of American children are currently overweight. Of these, half are obese — the highest rate in the OECD."

"the United States’ homicide rate is 5.0, higher than the OECD average of 2.1 and one of the highest in the OECD."


--------------

The U.S. is second world, overall.

You should live in Europe or Canada a few years so that you experience a first world life.
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Old 05-14-2013, 03:37 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,684 posts, read 40,128,989 times
Reputation: 11862
I experienced a bit of a culture shock visiting the States from Australia. The people are actually quite different.
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Old 05-14-2013, 03:49 AM
 
10,901 posts, read 11,891,058 times
Reputation: 27727
Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
Those are metric paper sizes. We use U.S. Customary (aka American Imperial) sizes here and it's measured in inches and have nicknames instead (letter size, legal size, etc.). What you call A4 we call eight and a half by eleven (inches) or letter.
American letter size sheets and A4 sheets, are different sizes whether you measure them in inches or cm. The are not the same thing with different names.
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Old 05-15-2013, 11:23 AM
 
5 posts, read 8,264 times
Reputation: 23
Default The US is still the standard for first world countries

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex =] View Post
The U.S. is not first world.

Canada, Australia, Japan, and some European countries are first world....

The U.S. is second world.

Some U.S. cities are first world but that does not mean the entire country is first world.
I have been to Canada, Japan, and southern Europe. None of these places have a higher standard of living than the United States. However, I will agree that the US is falling rapidly because of uncheck corruption; it is rotting out fast and may fall faster than the Roman Empire.

Europeans might have the highest quality of life because of the quality organic non-GMO foods the people consume.
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Old 05-15-2013, 09:52 PM
 
2,096 posts, read 3,388,148 times
Reputation: 1188
Quote:
Originally Posted by cattrainer View Post
I have been to Canada, Japan, and southern Europe. None of these places have a higher standard of living than the United States. However, I will agree that the US is falling rapidly because of uncheck corruption; it is rotting out fast and may fall faster than the Roman Empire.

Europeans might have the highest quality of life because of the quality organic non-GMO foods the people consume.
It depends what you mean by standard of living. If that's simply equivalent to mean disposable income the US is bar none the richest country in the world.
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Old 05-17-2013, 11:31 AM
 
2,892 posts, read 2,873,732 times
Reputation: 4348
Of course. The best comparison is Europe and (North) America.

Europe doesn't have an automobile culture.
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