U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-03-2013, 01:14 AM
 
2,603 posts, read 3,758,229 times
Reputation: 2372

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by boiseguy View Post
the US has probably the most.. with spanish, french and english early colonization.. as well as large immigrations from Denmark, Germany, Sweden, Norway.. (half the population of Norway immigrated to the United states in the late 1800's and early 1900's) later came the irish, and italians, I think hands down the US is the best representation of European Ancestry that has blended into a single nation of people.. I myself can name 6-10 countries in europe I have ancestry from... and I'm not alone..much of this was due to open land being offered for free in the interior of America.. Boise where I live has the largest concentration of Basque people outside of the Basque region in spain. There are places in Eastern Idaho where large groups of people from Sweden settled, where highways are called "New Sweden road" etc.. and you see lots of blondes running around still
Most of the Irish came in mid 1800s during the famine years. There were also Irish in the US before this time. The first St Patrick's Day parade occurred in the US in 1737 so the Irish have been in the US a long time.

On This Day: First St. Patrick
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-04-2013, 02:13 AM
 
Location: Stockholm, Sweden
382 posts, read 507,758 times
Reputation: 181
I have made a comparison a while back, from the census of Australia/Canada/US and compared the number of different European descendents in the country. I don't think this is the best way to compare but may gives a good idea of the makeup or diversity of European descendents in these countries.

From the statistics it appears that Australia has one dominate group (from the British Isles) and there are groups like Macedonian who favored Australia over the other two as an emigration country. More recent immigrant groups such as Italian and Greeks also outnumber the more traditional immigrant groups (such as Germans, Scandinavians in North America). An example would be people of Italian Australians outnumbering German Australians and Greek Australians outnumbering Scandinavian Australians, neither of which are the case in Canada or USA.

Canada has, to a lesser degree, two dominate groups, immigrants from the British Isles (The number of Scots are proportionally high compared to the other countries) and France. There are also groups that favored Canada over the other countries like Iceland for example a century back. But the makeup of European descents tends to be fairly similar to USA in proportion to its population (kind of between Australia and USA). There are also cases of more recent immigrants having a more significant pressence in Canada such as Dutch Canadians.

The US has a longer history of immigration from non-British Isles countries, and the diversity does reflect that. The population of Germans is proportionally higher (although Canada has similar percentage). There are also Hispanics/Latino Americans, which accounts for a large portion of the survey that I wasn't sure how I could incorporate the data into this.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-24-2014, 04:57 AM
 
Location: Manila
1,144 posts, read 1,488,611 times
Reputation: 732
Quote:
Originally Posted by Davy-040 View Post
Non European Countries with over 1 million European decedents:

Canada
USA
Cuba
Puerto Rico
Mexico
Guatemala
Nicaragua
Costa Rica
Colombia
Venezuela
Ecuador
Peru
Bolivia
Paraguay
Chile
Argentina
Uruguay
Brazil
South Africa
Philippines
Australia
New Zealand
If you are going by number of Filipinos with varying degrees of European blood admixture (even if it's a very small - at least in the single digits percentage), you may have a point. But if you are going by the number of Filipinos who are of purely (or largely) European descent, I would be hard pressed to believe there are a million (or more) of them in the Philippines. However, no one will truly know as the Census doesn't keep track of figures with regards to ethnic background...

Just the opinion of someone who lives in the country. Thanks.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-24-2014, 05:01 AM
 
Location: Czech Republic
2,385 posts, read 5,556,955 times
Reputation: 788
Argentina
Brasil
Venezuela
Australia
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-24-2014, 08:50 PM
 
Location: Australia
246 posts, read 273,184 times
Reputation: 355
Namibia.

Zimbabwe used to have a pretty large white population, but most left the country now due to political reasons.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-25-2014, 01:23 AM
 
1,100 posts, read 1,317,810 times
Reputation: 492
Quote:
Originally Posted by fikatid View Post
I have made a comparison a while back, from the census of Australia/Canada/US and compared the number of different European descendents in the country. I don't think this is the best way to compare but may gives a good idea of the makeup or diversity of European descendents in these countries.

From the statistics it appears that Australia has one dominate group (from the British Isles) and there are groups like Macedonian who favored Australia over the other two as an emigration country. More recent immigrant groups such as Italian and Greeks also outnumber the more traditional immigrant groups (such as Germans, Scandinavians in North America). An example would be people of Italian Australians outnumbering German Australians and Greek Australians outnumbering Scandinavian Australians, neither of which are the case in Canada or USA.

Canada has, to a lesser degree, two dominate groups, immigrants from the British Isles (The number of Scots are proportionally high compared to the other countries) and France. There are also groups that favored Canada over the other countries like Iceland for example a century back. But the makeup of European descents tends to be fairly similar to USA in proportion to its population (kind of between Australia and USA). There are also cases of more recent immigrants having a more significant pressence in Canada such as Dutch Canadians.

The US has a longer history of immigration from non-British Isles countries, and the diversity does reflect that. The population of Germans is proportionally higher (although Canada has similar percentage). There are also Hispanics/Latino Americans, which accounts for a large portion of the survey that I wasn't sure how I could incorporate the data into this.
What data did you use to assess the ethic make up of the current populations? For example, while there would be more Italian born Australians than German born, there would be a lot more descendants of 19th century German immigrants than is the case for Italian immigrants of that era.

For Aus, I'd separate out the Irish Catholics a little, particularly from the English: at the time they were characterized by a different language, different culture, and of course a very different religious mix. That cultural division was an underlying factor of the political divisions seen in early 20th century Australia over issues like participation in WW 1, and more specifically the divisive debate over attempts to introduce conscription for that conflict.

Last edited by Richard1098; 03-25-2014 at 01:39 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-25-2014, 02:01 AM
 
4,454 posts, read 5,476,760 times
Reputation: 2146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bernie20 View Post
Most Americans are of mixed European descent. There are not that many that are just of British descent. Also Irish ancestry in the US is over reported (not to say there isn't quite a bit of Irish) mainly because a lot of Americans have ancestry from the Scots-Irish and just call it Irish but in general Americans have multiple ancestry from Europe. I'm not that sure on Canada but they have quite a number of people of French ancestry.

Countries like Australia and New Zealand are more likely to descend from just British Isles ancestry although this is changing here as well. Countries like Australia also have quite a few Italians, Greeks and Dutch as far as Europeans go.

For an example just pick a well know American (that you think is mainly of British descent)? I bet they are of mixed European descent.

Someone like Julia Roberts is of German, English, Scottish, Welsh, Swedish descent. She is also said to have possible Cherokee.
Large number of Australians are mixed European descent. New Zealanders whites are more likely to have British Isle ancestry than white Australians.

English speaking White Canadians I would say are like White Americans and are mixed European descent.

I believe the amount of Americans claiming Cherokee are over rated. What is under reported is the amount of white Americans claiming to have part Black ancestry.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-25-2014, 04:59 AM
 
Location: Stockholm, Sweden
382 posts, read 507,758 times
Reputation: 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard1098 View Post
What data did you use to assess the ethic make up of the current populations? For example, while there would be more Italian born Australians than German born, there would be a lot more descendants of 19th century German immigrants than is the case for Italian immigrants of that era.

For Aus, I'd separate out the Irish Catholics a little, particularly from the English: at the time they were characterized by a different language, different culture, and of course a very different religious mix. That cultural division was an underlying factor of the political divisions seen in early 20th century Australia over issues like participation in WW 1, and more specifically the divisive debate over attempts to introduce conscription for that conflict.
I have used the statistics collected from Australian Bureau of Statistics, Statistics Canada and U.S. Census Bureau for the data. I think they are more or less as official of a data as one could find. But of course like you mentioned, they are probably not extremely accurate. People's attitudes changes over time, and a lot of non first generation Australia persons probably put Australian as their first ancestry. This would be the case for both Canada and USA too.

But there is an interesting table showing the top birthplace of Australians since federation (page 24-26): http://www.aph.gov.au/binaries/libra...population.pdf

May help give a better picture of the immigrant patterns of Australia throughout the years.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-26-2014, 04:26 AM
 
1,100 posts, read 1,317,810 times
Reputation: 492
Quote:
Originally Posted by fikatid View Post
I have used the statistics collected from Australian Bureau of Statistics, Statistics Canada and U.S. Census Bureau for the data. I think they are more or less as official of a data as one could find. But of course like you mentioned, they are probably not extremely accurate. People's attitudes changes over time, and a lot of non first generation Australia persons probably put Australian as their first ancestry. This would be the case for both Canada and USA too.

But there is an interesting table showing the top birthplace of Australians since federation (page 24-26): http://www.aph.gov.au/binaries/libra...population.pdf

May help give a better picture of the immigrant patterns of Australia throughout the years.
Yep, I think most non-first generation Aussies consider themselves to be simply "Australian". The only exception that to that is probably those who's ancestry can be traced back to only one country - and the aren't too many of those. Also, a lot of "European" Australians, based on physical features, look to have some traces of Chinese/Japanese or Aboriginal ancestry, even if that is limited to a single great-great grandparent in the 1800s. Julian Assange, for example, has a great-great grand parent who was a Torres Straight Islander. I don't know how that compares to Canada or the US.

Its a shame those tables don't break out the "other - 41.5%" - seems like a pretty large proportion to simply aggregate in that way. I suspect today that "other" is probably close on 50%, with UK born now slipping to 18-19% of the foreign born population.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-26-2014, 02:50 PM
 
Location: North West Northern Ireland.
20,695 posts, read 18,542,348 times
Reputation: 3107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard1098 View Post
What data did you use to assess the ethic make up of the current populations? For example, while there would be more Italian born Australians than German born, there would be a lot more descendants of 19th century German immigrants than is the case for Italian immigrants of that era.

For Aus, I'd separate out the Irish Catholics a little, particularly from the English: at the time they were characterized by a different language, different culture, and of course a very different religious mix. That cultural division was an underlying factor of the political divisions seen in early 20th century Australia over issues like participation in WW 1, and more specifically the divisive debate over attempts to introduce conscription for that conflict.
Different language?

Please slap yourself!!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:07 PM.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top