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Old 03-29-2014, 07:43 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,083 posts, read 9,572,321 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard1098 View Post
That reflects the 200 year head start the US had on Australia, where free immigration really only began in the early-mid 1800s. Interestingly enough, today the US is far less of a nation of immigrants than Aus, with the foreign born population being "only" 13% compared to 27%, numbers that reflect the immigration patterns trhough most of the 20th and early 21st centuries.

Your nation is quite small compared to the US, and so any percentages will sound a lot more impressive than raw numbers.

The USA takes in many more immigrants any given year than Australia. We take in over 1M per year, but because our population is so much larger of course the % will be smaller. Currently there are around 17M Americans of Italian descent, 11.M of French descent, and 50M Americans claim Spanish ancestry, the list goes on and on. 17M is around 74% of the population of Australia.

25% of your immigrants are from New Zealand and the UK.

Take a look at 2012 immigration to the US and Australia:


https://www.dhs.gov/sites/default/fi..._fr_2012_2.pdf




Fact Sheet 2



USA 2012 Immigration




USA breakdown by Country







Looks to me like we have a larger and more diverse immigrant stream than Australia.




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Old 03-29-2014, 07:52 PM
 
318 posts, read 454,139 times
Reputation: 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by Davy-040 View Post
Non European Countries with over 1 million European decedents:

Canada
USA
Cuba
Puerto Rico
Mexico
Guatemala
Nicaragua
Costa Rica
Colombia
Venezuela
Ecuador
Peru
Bolivia
Paraguay
Chile
Argentina
Uruguay
Brazil
South Africa
Philippines
Australia
New Zealand
The only way there are over 1 million White people in Philippines is if you count people who look like Vanessa Hudgens as "White".

There are extremely few Filipinos who phenotype wise would be able to pass for White in a Western country.

This thread is about people who would look White to most Western eyes, not a thread about which Brown phenotype people have the most White admixture.


If The Philippines had a large White population, you would see a lot of Filipinos in soap operas who look like Adam Sandler for example, but you don't.

White people always dominate the soap operas in countries where they make up a sizable percentage of the population. The fact that White faces do not dominate Filipino soap operas, should say it all that Whites are not a large demographic in The Philippines.

Last edited by Alexander Rusev; 03-29-2014 at 08:24 PM..
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Old 03-29-2014, 08:43 PM
 
1,100 posts, read 1,316,709 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
Your nation is quite small compared to the US, and so any percentages will sound a lot more impressive than raw numbers.

The USA takes in many more immigrants any given year than Australia. We take in over 1M per year, but because our population is so much larger of course the % will be smaller. Currently there are around 17M Americans of Italian descent, 11.M of French descent, and 50M Americans claim Spanish ancestry, the list goes on and on. 17M is around 74% of the population of Australia.

25% of your immigrants are from New Zealand and the UK.

Take a look at 2012 immigration to the US and Australia:


https://www.dhs.gov/sites/default/fi..._fr_2012_2.pdf




Fact Sheet 2



USA 2012 Immigration




USA breakdown by Country







Looks to me like we have a larger and more diverse immigrant stream than Australia.



Of course the US is a larger country, but that also means the comparative impact of, say 100,000 immigrants, is much, much less there.

Why did you only list a small number of countries of origin for Aus? Just under half our immigrant intake is from countries outside the top ten sources. Also, those arriving from NZ are ethnically a mix of Maori, Pacific Islander and European Kiwis. As for the UK, 1/3 if them will return home within a few years, so you need to adjust for that.

But however you count the numbers 27% foreign born is a lot higher than 13%
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Old 03-29-2014, 10:13 PM
 
Location: Brisbane
3,355 posts, read 5,165,490 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard1098 View Post
Of course the US is a larger country, but that also means the comparative impact of, say 100,000 immigrants, is much, much less there.

Why did you only list a small number of countries of origin for Aus? Just under half our immigrant intake is from countries outside the top ten sources. Also, those arriving from NZ are ethnically a mix of Maori, Pacific Islander and European Kiwis. As for the UK, 1/3 if them will return home within a few years, so you need to adjust for that.

But however you count the numbers 27% foreign born is a lot higher than 13%
Settler arrivals is also no real indication of permanent migration to Australia anyway. It excludes people who change visa status from temp to permanent from within Australia. India and China have been by far the biggest source of nett permanent Immigration to Australia over the last 10 years.
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Old 03-30-2014, 08:03 AM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,083 posts, read 9,572,321 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielsa1775 View Post
Settler arrivals is also no real indication of permanent migration to Australia anyway. It excludes people who change visa status from temp to permanent from within Australia. India and China have been by far the biggest source of nett permanent Immigration to Australia over the last 10 years.

Same happens here. Large numbers change status here as well.

Any person visiting the US vs Australia will note the massive British impact on Australia versus a smaller British and more diverse European continental (especially German) impact on the US. The US was taking in over a million immigrants from Europe per year even in the early 1900's when our population was a lot smaller.
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Old 03-30-2014, 08:04 AM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,083 posts, read 9,572,321 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard1098 View Post
Of course the US is a larger country, but that also means the comparative impact of, say 100,000 immigrants, is much, much less there.

Why did you only list a small number of countries of origin for Aus? Just under half our immigrant intake is from countries outside the top ten sources. Also, those arriving from NZ are ethnically a mix of Maori, Pacific Islander and European Kiwis. As for the UK, 1/3 if them will return home within a few years, so you need to adjust for that.

But however you count the numbers 27% foreign born is a lot higher than 13%

The Australian website I used only listed what I displayed.
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Old 03-30-2014, 01:29 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
Same happens here. Large numbers change status here as well.

Any person visiting the US vs Australia will note the massive British impact on Australia versus a smaller British and more diverse European continental (especially German) impact on the US. The US was taking in over a million immigrants from Europe per year even in the early 1900's when our population was a lot smaller.
That's very much a perception issue: who knows what "they" will notice or preconceive. After a holiday to the east coast a friend of mine thinks "Americans are so British".

The impact of 19th century German immigration in Australia is somewhat disguised. Most German immigrants of that period came here from eastern Germany to escape religious persecution by the then king of Prussia. As a result, they were certainly not pro-German in their sentiments, and when WWI occurred they were quite quick to Anglicise their own names and those of the cities and towns they founded. Australian place names changed from German names - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

But the influence is still there if you look. One example is the number of Lutheran Churches you'll find, even in rural areas, of SA, Qld and NSW. Walla Walla, NSW | Aussie Towns

Other influences also are embedded in Australia if you can recognise them. There is a reason why the train from Adelaide to Darwin is called "the Ghan" (Not a reference to Europe, but it is illustrative)
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Old 03-30-2014, 11:48 PM
 
Location: Stockholm, Sweden
382 posts, read 507,449 times
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One can't quite compare the German influences in South Australia to that of Midwest. There are twice as many people claiming having some German ancestry in the US than twice the population of Australia. But then I am one of those people who noticed the larger British influence on Australia than its North American counterpart.
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Old 03-31-2014, 12:26 AM
 
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Well one thing about Australia it is not very common for people to have one single ethnicity. It is very very common to hear Australians have more than one single ethnicity that is not entirely British Isles, especially for places such as Sydney and Melbourne. Of course in Perth you are much more likely to have people of British background compared to the Eastern Cities, yet it is the eastern cities where most of Australia population lives.

In the US it is the Southern States and Utah where the white people are more predominately British background compared to other regions in the US.

Last edited by other99; 03-31-2014 at 12:35 AM..
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Old 03-31-2014, 12:41 AM
 
1,100 posts, read 1,316,709 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fikatid View Post
One can't quite compare the German influences in South Australia to that of Midwest. There are twice as many people claiming having some German ancestry in the US than twice the population of Australia. But then I am one of those people who noticed the larger British influence on Australia than its North American counterpart.
How much "German" constitutes "German ancestry" though? Similarly for groups like the Italian speaking Swiss in Victoria - they are pretty obvious when you see the names of people in that region; or the old Italian influence in parts of coastal Qld that is pretty inescapable. I think you need to remember just how small the population of Australia was at that time.

Its funny, but in terms of North America, Canada struck me as a very "British" place; the political system (of all the former British colonies, only Canada has retained a UK House of Lords style body in its political system, or kept the UK style pageantry out side Parliament), the sense of reserved "politeness", the accent (very strong Scottish influence), attitudes towards the monarchy (which really surprised me), and a lot of other things. But I suspect those things are not perceived by Canadians as essentially "British". For example, Canada has Mount Logan which is probably seen as a "Canadian"name, the US has Mt McKinley (perceived as an American name, presumably), while we have Mount Kosciuszko, which is the "British" influence? Similarly, while Canada has Hudson's Bay, and the US has Sears, our largest department store chain was named after after it's founder, Simcha Myer Baevski - a 19th century Russian/Belarussion immigrant.

I think it also depends a lot on what part of a country you see.

If someone comes to Australia visits Sydney and does the typical tourist "harbour thing", of course they will see British influences, because that's where British settlement started and was centred. If they go to what were the gold fields of Victoria and see the old abandoned Chinese joss houses, they'll have avery different impression. Bendigo Joss House Temple If they travel to the top end and go onto places like Broome (which in the 1800s was a major centre at a time when Perth was small), they'll see yet another perspective on Australia's history. https://www.google.com.au/search?q=B...=2559&bih=1246

Last edited by Richard1098; 03-31-2014 at 01:07 AM..
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