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Old 09-08-2013, 06:50 PM
 
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How close or distant culturally separate is Brazil from the rest of South America? Is the language difference of Portuguese vs. Spanish enough to isolate Brazil in culture, life, tourism, scenery, and international relations compared to Spanish speaking South America, Central America, Caribbean?

I expect Southern Brazil: Sao Paulo, Parana, Santa Catarina, Rio Grande Sol and the country of Argentina must have the most prominent relations, and getting along very well for plenty of reasons. What about the other regions of Brazil with Argentina, Chile, Paraguay, Uruguay, Bolivia, and Peru?

Last edited by Thepastpresentandfuture; 09-08-2013 at 07:19 PM..
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Old 09-08-2013, 07:16 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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I don't know if it's true, but I heard Portuguese people can kind of understand Spanish, but the reverse isn't true. I don't know how that works though. I always think Brazil is culturally most like Venezuela, Colombia, and even Trinidad Tobago in culture though.
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Old 09-08-2013, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Czech Republic
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Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
I don't know if it's true, but I heard Portuguese people can kind of understand Spanish, but the reverse isn't true. I don't know how that works though. I always think Brazil is culturally most like Venezuela, Colombia, and even Trinidad Tobago in culture though.
Yes they can, although there are some words that are not really the same.
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Old 09-10-2013, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Europe
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Hermosaa is right, we can understand each other (more or less) unless the acent is very strange or one of those that foreigners can't understand well. It depends also on the area, I understand better someone from Madeira Islands than someone from Lisbon, I am not sure about Brazil.
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Old 09-10-2013, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Casca - Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil
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The brazilian population is too concentrated in the Atlantic coast, and the two biggest regions (more than 70% of the population) don't have any boundary with other countries.

Some cities of the South are very connected with Uruguay, Argentina and Paraguay. In the North some cities are connected with Bolivia, Colombia, Venezuela, etc.

But only some (mostly small) cities. In general the brazilian population is distant from the others populations of South America.
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Old 09-10-2013, 02:15 PM
 
Location: São Paulo, Brazil
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Originally Posted by EduardoFinatto View Post
The brazilian population is too concentrated in the Atlantic coast, and the two biggest regions (more than 70% of the population) don't have any boundary with other countries.

Some cities of the South are very connected with Uruguay, Argentina and Paraguay. In the North some cities are connected with Bolivia, Colombia, Venezuela, etc.

But only some (mostly small) cities. In general the brazilian population is distant from the others populations of South America.
It's true.

There are, however, an increasing population of peruvians and bolivians in São Paulo, and many tourist cities like Florianópolis, Búzios and Salvador receive people from other latin american countries, mostly from Argentina.

About the mutual inteligibility, I personally understand the spanish of Madrid spoken in Mexico better than the spanish of Argentina, despite the proximity; the mexicans speak more clearly. However, when I need to talk in spanish with someone, I use the dialect from Madrid, since my teacher was from there and this is the variety which I learned.
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Old 09-12-2013, 05:22 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
I don't know if it's true, but I heard Portuguese people can kind of understand Spanish, but the reverse isn't true.
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Originally Posted by Hermosaa View Post
Yes they can, although there are some words that are not really the same.
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Originally Posted by Catbelle View Post
Hermosaa is right, we can understand each other (more or less) unless the accent is very strange or one of those that foreigners can't understand well. It depends also on the area, I understand better someone from Madeira Islands than someone from Lisbon, I am not sure about Brazil.
Spanish and Portuguese are beautiful, sophisticated, and highly communicative languages too. What level of similarities is there between Spanish and Portuguese language? The mutual intelligibility is somehow not having evenly distributed reciprocation in events.

How is this possible for Portuguese speakers understanding Spanish much better and not the same in reverse for Spanish speakers comprehending Portuguese?
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Old 09-12-2013, 05:27 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EduardoFinatto View Post
The brazilian population is too concentrated in the Atlantic coast, and the two biggest regions (more than 70% of the population) don't have any boundary with other countries.

Some cities of the South are very connected with Uruguay, Argentina and Paraguay. In the North some cities are connected with Bolivia, Colombia, Venezuela, etc.

But only some (mostly small) cities. In general the brazilian population is distant from the others populations of South America.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fabio SBA View Post
It's true.

There are, however, an increasing population of peruvians and bolivians in São Paulo, and many tourist cities like Florianópolis, Búzios and Salvador receive people from other latin american countries, mostly from Argentina.

About the mutual inteligibility, I personally understand the spanish of Madrid spoken in Mexico better than the spanish of Argentina, despite the proximity; the mexicans speak more clearly. However, when I need to talk in spanish with someone, I use the dialect from Madrid, since my teacher was from there and this is the variety which I learned.
Is the Brazilian population feeling distant from the Spanish speaking South American countries only because of language, or is there other reasons for feeling culturally separate?

There is more prominent connections to some of Spanish speaking South American countries in the Southern regions of Brazil: Sao Paulo, Parana, Santa Catarina, Rio Grande Sol to Argentina, and Uruguay, mostly for tourism.

What is your view from Brazil of an Argentine immigrant community in Brazil or Brazilian community in Argentina? What is the largest Spanish speaking ethnic nationality immigrant community in Brazil?

Last edited by Thepastpresentandfuture; 09-12-2013 at 05:42 PM..
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Old 09-12-2013, 06:26 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thepastpresentandfuture View Post
Spanish and Portuguese are beautiful, sophisticated, and highly communicative languages too. What level of similarities is there between Spanish and Portuguese language? The mutual intelligibility is somehow not having evenly distributed reciprocation in events.

How is this possible for Portuguese speakers understanding Spanish much better and not the same in reverse for Spanish speakers comprehending Portuguese?
I have no clue, but I'm sure Spanish speakers can understand some Portuguese. Maybe Portuguese has more unfamiliar words to Spaniards than vice versa?
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Old 09-18-2013, 03:58 PM
 
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Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
I have no clue, but I'm sure Spanish speakers can understand some Portuguese. Maybe Portuguese has more unfamiliar words to Spaniards than vice versa?
What are your favorite languages outside of your native language? My favorite languages are French, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Swedish, Dutch, Russian, Romanian, Mandarin Chinese, Thai, Japanese, Vietnamese, Hindi, Malay, and English.


There must be more reasons other than language for why Brazil is feeling distant and cultural separation from the Spanish speaking countries in South America, and the Brazilians are not telling us right now.
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