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Old 05-03-2016, 12:04 PM
 
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Originally Posted by yofie View Post
I'm thinking now - in addition to all the reasons above, one could say that for Canada and South Africa, you could say that after Britain took them over from the French and the Dutch, they became linked to the transportation/trade network whereby routes to Canada and South Africa from Continental Europe were essentially funneled through London and England. Plus, the British preferred British Isles immigrants (as opposed to Continental European immigrants) to come to Canada and South Africa (and Australia and New Zealand).

The difference with the Latin American countries, I think, is that once they became independent, they were not linked with any empire-oriented transport/trade routes, so that you could have regular shipping routes go direct from French or German ports or whatever to Mexican, Brazilian, Argentine, Chilean, and other Latin ports. And as far as I know, the Latins didn't have a preference for immigrants to come from one or two source countries.

I think that makes as much sense (if not more) as the other reasons stated above; your thoughts?
In Brazil when we became independent from Portugal for the first 60 years Portuguese were not permitted immigrate in large number.

How our first imperator (yes we had a imperator not president) Pedro I (Crown Prince of the Portuguese throne) was married with a Austrian princess they started the colonization of the countryside of Brazil with Germans people (from all lands where had ethnically Germany people) including tons of Germans from Volga in south Russia.
But they were a big problem to assimilate in Brazilian-Latin European–Catholic roman culture.
So Italians, Spanish and Portuguese (Latin languages speakers, roman Catholics culture) could enter in free amounts in Brazil another Europeans and Japanese had quotes limits.
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Old 05-03-2016, 03:48 PM
 
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Travel between Quebecers (who were mostly working class) and France was rare during the 19C and early 20C. I just looked up some sources online, and I found a few references.

First, references to professional musicians. Music teachers arrived in Quebec from France during the mid-1800s, and they encouraged pupils to pursue further studies in Paris, which some of them did. Books imported from France were the norm until British rule happened. Books and papers had to be published within Canada for several decades. (There weren't even very many English books printed in Canada during that period, mostly they were imported from England.) The first French-language bookstore in Montreal didn't open until 1815.

In the 1840s, there were parish libraries set up (controlled by the Catholic church, which controlled the French-language school system). By the 1890s, some Quebec benefactors and collectors had set up a French-language section in Montreal's city library. Montreal publishers were by then reproducing books by French authors, but they had to secure copyright from France first, which was apparently challenging.

Films became probably the first big step in reconnecting Quebec with the culture of France. Imported films from France came to Montreal by 1910 and were popular. Short Quebec-based films were also made at that early period and watched by Quebecers. After WW2, trade with Europe became more widespread and diverse for anglophones as well as francophones, so I'm guessing the 1950s is when huge amounts of imported books, magazine, records, etc. became widespread in Quebec. That would've had a big influence on the Quiet Revolution (the development of Quebec's modern sovereign identity).

South Africa is interesting because I've discovered that it's more ethnically diverse than I'd thought... since British rule, they had immigrants from elsewhere in the British Empire. India, Ireland, Chinese, Vietnamese, etc. That Dutch influence all but disappeared.
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Old 08-09-2018, 03:58 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I suppose it was, as I said, because the Canadian government did not want French Canadians to migrate in large numbers to the west, and preferred that they move to the United States. So migrant travel from Ukraine and other parts of Europe was more heavily subsidized than over much shorter distances within Canada.

Clifford Sifton, who was the great orchestrator of the settlement of the Canadian Prairies, was not known for being a big "fan" of French Canadians.
They were blatantly wrong. Had they received large numbers of French immigrants, the Quebecois issue would not exist.
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Old 08-09-2018, 04:32 AM
 
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Originally Posted by paul1981 View Post
As people mentioned above, there was little emigration from France during the 19th/20th centuries (French territories such as Algeria had to be settled by Spaniards and Italians in large numbers who were given French citizenship). Even during French rule there was never much migration to the New World, and what little there was peaked during the 17th century. Quebec's population growth depended on having children. In contrast to France, the Quebecois were among the most fertile people in the world, which is why their population grew from a mere 65,000 at the time of the British conquest.

Regarding Portugal/Brazil, my parents are from Portugal and I have spent quite a lot of time in both countries and from what I gather Portuguese people tend to know a lot about Brazilian popular culture where the same isn't as true. The Brazilian accent and slang is well understood in Portugal and during the 2000s a large number of Brazilians immigrated to Portugal, so there is a degree of familiarity with the culture. Portugal does "punch above its weight" in Brazil if you will though, during the 1990s Portuguese firms invested heavily in the country and Portugal's airline TAP is the largest foreign carrier in the country.

Portuguese continued to emigrate in large numbers to Brazil until the early 1960s. After that, the number of Portuguese moving to Brazil tended to be under 1,000 per year (that has changed in the past 5 years). So the image that many Brazilians have of Portuguese people tends to be one of poor backwards people and this became the source of jokes. Many in Brazil still think of Portuguese people as hicks. However, what I noticed is that almost everyone seems to know someone who is Portuguese or have a relative from Portugal and for the most part Brazilians seem to like Portuguese food. This is probably because the Portuguese have been the largest number of immigrants to the country even after independence (even surpassing the Italians).

As for Spain and Latin America, I noticed some countries seem to show more animosity towards Spain, especially Mexico. I think many people still blame modern Spaniards for the past (even though no one was alive then). Argentinians seem to like Spaniards and I know that many Argentines settled in Spain in the early 2000s and were generally well received. Cubans also seem to be well liked by the Spaniards, and the island is popular vacation spot for Spaniards. Many Cubans also have Spanish grandparents etc. as the island was the second most popular destination for Spanish emigrants after Argentina before 1940. Interestingly enough, Galicia was the largest source of emigrants so that in Latin America all Spaniards are often referred to as "Gallegos".

During Spain's economic boom in the 2000s, over 1 million Latin Americans moved to Spain. The largest numbers were from Ecuador, Colombia, Bolivia and Peru. However, most of these people had little connection to Spain and most were mestizos or of indigenous origins and there were problems with discrimination. I know that some have left Spain since the economy collapsed there. As I mentioned earlier, there were large numbers of Argentines who moved too, but most of these were able to come with Spanish passports as they had parents or grandparents born in Spain.

Finally with the Netherlands/Afrikaners. Like the Quebecois, there was little influence on the Afrikaners after the British conquered Cape Colony. Apparently Dutch and Afrikaans are mutually intelligible, however Afrikaans is more archaic. Like the Quebecois, the Afrikaners remained much more religious than their brethren in the mother-country. Though there was some Dutch emigration to South Africa, I think there were only 20,000 or so Dutch born people in the country by 1990. I believe that Dutch society tends to be more liberal.

Indeed, many immigrants from Ecuador, etc, which were very humble and Andean in origin, but at least in Catalonia they have had less assimilation problems than the massive immigration from southern Spain. They do not have any issues with Catalans.

All the anti-Spanish drivel in Latin America is just poppycock used by white elites to save their skin, not real.

Last edited by farinello; 08-09-2018 at 04:42 AM..
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Old 08-14-2018, 02:29 PM
 
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I wouldn't say South Africa has much in common with the Netherlands. The language is similar, although hard to understand for Dutch people. No cultural similarities otherwise.

The main difference is that the Netherlands knows no racism like South Africa used to have. We never had this apartheid. South Africa made great progress in this sense, I heard they even had a black president at some point.
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Old 08-15-2018, 06:32 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Originally Posted by drro View Post
I wouldn't say South Africa has much in common with the Netherlands. The language is similar, although hard to understand for Dutch people. No cultural similarities otherwise.

The main difference is that the Netherlands knows no racism like South Africa used to have. We never had this apartheid. South Africa made great progress in this sense, I heard they even had a black president at some point.
Yeah, his name probably rings a bell for most people!
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Old 08-15-2018, 06:44 AM
 
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Well, there are as many people who speak the Afrikaans language who are not White as the first language in South Africa as the White ones. The White Afrikaans speakers are closer in cultural links to the non-White ones than the people of the Netherlands. Just like a White French-speaking Quebecois is closer in cultural links with a Quebecois Non-White whos whole family speaks French than with the people of France.
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Old 08-15-2018, 10:14 AM
 
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Originally Posted by herenow1 View Post
Well, there are as many people who speak the Afrikaans language who are not White as the first language in South Africa as the White ones. The White Afrikaans speakers are closer in cultural links to the non-White ones than the people of the Netherlands. Just like a White French-speaking Quebecois is closer in cultural links with a Quebecois Non-White whos whole family speaks French than with the people of France.
Yes, but on the other hand a French speaking Quebecois is closer in cultural links to a person from France than to an English speaking Canadian.
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Old 08-15-2018, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Originally Posted by drro View Post
Yes, but on the other hand a French speaking Quebecois is closer in cultural links to a person from France than to an English speaking Canadian.
For some things yes for some things no.
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Old 08-21-2018, 11:53 AM
 
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French do seem to get along better with English Camadiams, that do seem to love French from France. Quite easely explained, English Canada is an open culture, while French Canadians are stuck on their defeat date 300 years ago.
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