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Old 09-28-2013, 08:29 AM
 
163 posts, read 121,302 times
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And could parts or all of it be adopted as a model? The best system might be one that's the most accessible, comprehensive, affordable, user-friendly and successful against illness. And though I cannot answer this question, I do know about the British and German systems. Each is good, with the latter, the better
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Old 09-28-2013, 08:30 AM
 
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If there isn't an outright answer to this question in terms of an existing system, what would be theoretically the best?
And does each nation need a system? Wouldn't it be more efficient if we were all shown and trained how to treat ourselves, but with professional help available for accidents, emergencies, surgery, etc? Is the internet set to change things?

Last edited by OldChina; 09-28-2013 at 08:41 AM..
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Old 09-28-2013, 08:55 AM
 
Location: London/Doha/Cambridge
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I hate to ever call one system the "best" because there are many features from different countries that could be viewed as best practices.

With that said I view the Swiss system as the best in my mind. It has somehow found a way to balance innovation and responsibility. They have incredible facilities, some of the best trained specialists in the world and have found a way to cover everyone using a true private/public partnership. On top of that they have very low wait times for necessary and elective procedures. Plus no one can ever argue that research and innovation has been stifled in any way.

Finally what I also love about the Swiss system is the amount of choices their citizens have when selecting insurance. In many instances they can choose from over 90 competing plans at one time.

Just a great system all around, I personally am glad Obama consulted with many Swiss Healthcare economists when crafting the Affordable Care Act.

The Netherlands, Germany, France and Taiwan along with many other countries also have alot many can learn from. Also Massachusetts while not its own country has one of the best Healthcare Systems in the world, and if it was its own country we would be speaking about it up there with the Swiss system.
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Old 09-28-2013, 08:58 AM
 
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Default World Health Organization ranking of health systems


Chart below Shorthand: green indicates better performance, yellow average performance, and red worse performance. The U.S. has the highest number of reds and the lowest number of greens of any nation in this selection of nations belonging to the (OECD). Link to article where chart can be found in.



Bloomberg's Most efficient healthcare counties.

Quote:
It's important to note that this data doesn't necessarily reflect the best health care in the world; it is simply a measure of overall quality as a function of cost. Bloomberg explains its methodology as such:
Each country was ranked on three criteria: life expectancy (weighted 60%), relative per capita cost of health care (30%); and absolute per capita cost of health care (10%). Countries were scored on each criterion and the scores were weighted and summed to obtain their efficiency scores. Relative cost is health cost per capita as a percentage of GDP per capita. Absolute cost is total health expenditure, which covers preventive and curative health services, family planning, nutrition activities and emergency aid. Included were countries with populations of at least five million, GDP per capita of at least $5,000 and life expectancy of at least 70 years.
Link to graphics below and article.



The last time WHO ranked healthcare systems was in year 2000.

Ranking Country Expenditure Per Capita

1 France 4
2 Italy 11
3 San Marino 21
4 Andorra 23
5 Malta 37
6 Singapore 38
7 Spain 24
8 Oman 62
9 Austria 6
10 Japan 13
11 Norway 16
12 Portugal 27
13 Monaco 12
14 Greece 30
15 Iceland 14
16 Luxembourg 5
17 Netherlands 9
18 United Kingdom 26
19 Ireland 25
20 Switzerland 2
21 Belgium 15
22 Colombia 49
23 Sweden 7
24 Cyprus 39
25 Germany 3
26 Saudi Arabia 63
27 United Arab Emirates 35
28 Israel 19
29 Morocco 99
30 Canada 10
31 Finland 18
32 Australia 17
33 Chile 44
34 Argentina 15
35 Denmark 8
36 Dominica 70
37 Costa Rica 50
38 United States 1
39 Slovenia 29
40 Cuba 118
41 Brunei 32
42 New Zealand 20
43 Bahrain 48
44 Croatia 56
45 Qatar 27
46 Kuwait 41
47 Barbados 36
48 Thailand 64
49 Czech Republic 40
50 Malaysia 93
51 Poland 58
52 Dominican Republic 92
53 Tunisia 79
54 Jamaica 89
55 Venezuela 68
56 Albania 149
57 Seychelles 52
58 Paraguay 91
59 South Korea 31
60 Senegal 143
61 Philippines 124
62 Mexico 55
63 Slovakia 45
64 Egypt 115
65 Kazakhstan 112
66 Uruguay 33
67 Hungary 59
68 Trinidad and Tobago 65
69 Saint Lucia 86
70 Belize 88
71 Turkey 82
72 Nicaragua 104
73 Belarus 74
74 Lithuania 71
75 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 90
76 Sri Lanka 138
77 Estonia 60
78 Guatemala 130
79 Ukraine 111
80 Solomon Islands 134
81 Algeria 114
82 Palau 47
83 Jordan 98
84 Mauritius 69
85 Grenada 67
86 Antigua and Barbuda 43
87 Libya 84
88 Bangladesh 144
89 Macedonia 106
90 Bosnia-Herzegovina 105
91 Lebanon 46
92 Indonesia 154
93 Iran 94
94 Bahamas 22
95 Panama 53
96 Fiji 87
97 Benin 171
98 Nauru 42
99 Romania 107
100 Saint Kitts and Nevis 51
101 Moldova
102 Bulgaria
103 Iraq


For their size consistently well ranked: Spain, Italy, and Japan
Consistently well ranked: Australia, Sweden, Switzerland
Least Healthcare Cost: Japan, Sweden, Australia, Italy, Spain

Last edited by Daenerysstormborn; 09-28-2013 at 09:48 AM..
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Old 09-28-2013, 10:06 AM
Status: "notary sojac" (set 13 days ago)
 
Location: then: U.S.A., now: Europe
6,303 posts, read 5,587,615 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OldChina View Post
And could parts or all of it be adopted as a model? The best system might be one that's the most accessible, comprehensive, affordable, user-friendly and successful against illness. And though I cannot answer this question, I do know about the British and German systems. Each is good, with the latter, the better
Trying to impose a single style of democracy should have proved the wrong-headness of ignoring the vast differences among countries, e.g. economic, infrastructure, social systems, political, etc. etc.

A system that might be superb for Ireland, would never transplant to Botswana or Honduras or Cambodia. And finding the funds and the length of time involved in transplanting 1st world models to other environments would make for slow advancement. Rather than starting at the top with the assumption that we know what from another environment can be imposed, it makes more sense -early on, at least - to start at the bottom with what clearly isn't available and try to work up. I think the both the immediate and long term rewards would probably be greater.

Teaching people how to properly dispose of human and animal waste, to wash their hands frequently, to avoid pregnancies in the very young, etc. might save hundreds of thousands of lives in the time it would take to organize a centralized health program and build a few hospitals in large population centers.
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Old 09-28-2013, 10:34 AM
 
163 posts, read 121,302 times
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To try to be healthy a country has to contend, amongst other things, with the ignorance or health-awareness of its people, its wealth and availability of funds for funding healthcare, the training facilities for nurses, physicians, surgeons, etc, and maybe local conditions, which could give rise to disease to an extent different from that in other lands. For example, there might be conditions that are practically neither researched nor recorded, such as the electrical properties of the air or the magnetic ones of the ground, that affect our health. But before any studies can be undertaken, surely we should attach much more importance to food preparation, make it easier to become a doctor and to cause that profession to be more competitive, and to train individuals with the aid of the internet, etc so as to enable us to treat ourselves more often
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Old 09-28-2013, 11:20 AM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
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10 Most Prestigious Medical Centers in the World | Masters in Health Care
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Old 09-28-2013, 11:24 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
38,755 posts, read 39,152,929 times
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One very important but unaddressed factor is the expectations of the nation's population. In the USA, every American assumes a "right" to live to be 105 with all their teeth and somebody else's kidney, without missing a night's sleep, and that a way will be found to pay for it. Conversely, in the third world, people take it for granted that they will die, and it will be painful for themselves and inconvenient for their extended family, but they will still be thankful for the modicum of modern health care they receive along the way.

That expectation is what accounts for the huge discrepancy between the costs of what is perceived as acceptable level health care in one country or another.
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Old 09-28-2013, 12:38 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
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The Netherlands, which has had an "Obamacare"-style public/private hybrid system for years now, scores well by any measure.
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Old 09-28-2013, 01:15 PM
 
Location: World
191 posts, read 48,162 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OldChina View Post
If there isn't an outright answer to this question in terms of an existing system, what would be theoretically the best?
And does each nation need a system? Wouldn't it be more efficient if we were all shown and trained how to treat ourselves, but with professional help available for accidents, emergencies, surgery, etc? Is the internet set to change things?
I partly agree with this. Health care constitutes of 2 things - self awareness and public facilities. Both are important equally. Latter is responsible for advertisement/education for healthy living. In fact population aging forces developed world into individual health care to reduce expenses to promote well being style of living. i think, it is the right approach. Countries/communities have to find way of coexisting and average of healthcare over the world should be be aligned to the best level current state of art can provide. Of course that is utopia idealistic view but we have to go in this direction.
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