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Old 11-24-2013, 05:07 AM
 
13,496 posts, read 18,231,189 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
In the U.S., New York City definitely is like an island to itself.

But I always felt that if you came directly from a foreign country, then New York City could almost feel like home. It's as if the world is there.
BINGO!!!

When I came to NYC in 1959/60 to start my adult life after growing up in the USA in a small town and going to university in a small city, one the major draws was the degree to which NYC...or Manhattan especially, felt like it had one foot in the U.S. and the other "out there" in the rest of the world.

If the foreigner could almost feel like home, I wanted to feel not-at-home in the same place...I wanted the foreignness of Manhattan that made foreigners feel almost like home. And it did not disappoint, for decades by hook or by crook this quality held out against gentrification and the homogenization of Manhattan.

After a period of adjustment to the plastification of the city under Giuliani and the developers, NYC has a similar quality again...but contrary to how others feel, it is a new quality that it now shares with a cluster of world cities, Singapore, etc. I think it is no longer "an island to itself."
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Old 11-24-2013, 07:40 AM
 
Location: Satellite Of Love
296 posts, read 469,955 times
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New York feels like its own universe in that it is so different from the rest of the USA.

London feels like its own universe in that it is so different from everywhere else on the planet.
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Old 11-24-2013, 11:08 AM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,773 posts, read 21,540,799 times
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Yes but it's not the only city,
and I don't get the whole "it feels different from the rest of the U.S"
Uhhh yea! No sh-- name a city that "feels similar to the rest of the U.S"
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Old 11-24-2013, 11:39 AM
 
Location: In the heights
37,273 posts, read 39,596,627 times
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Pretty much any major regional center with a distinct enough identity that I've been to has its own unique sort of egotism, so I'm not sure if NYC is any more a world apart than several other cities.
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Old 11-24-2013, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,556 posts, read 20,842,572 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MissionIMPOSSIBRU View Post
It may be a bit grotty, but the MTA clearly overperforms relative to its budget in running a cheap, efficient, no-frills, 24 hour service.

The 'character' of the subway is a defining feature of the New York experience. The typical visitor is either hideously appalled or impressed by it (or both).
Yes I did see rats in the subway. Yes it was stinking hot in summer. And yes I wasn't too thrilled about all the garbage on the tracks.etc, but it didn't detract from it's character or usability for me. Plus as the above poster said it's much cheaper than the tube. NY just has that attitude that London seems to lack. London is genteel and still quite polite for a big city, which is a good thing I guess.
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Old 11-26-2013, 02:46 AM
 
1,890 posts, read 1,327,946 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
I know this is subjective, but there's something very unique about NYC.
The smell. I know, but what can you do about it?

Seriously though, the New York street attitude is something I have yet to find replicated anywhere else in the world. The other cities all have their own style; some may be better cities overall (perhaps Paris or London), but when it comes to that grungy, slightly crusty street cred we all know and love, NYC is very much unique in the world.
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Old 11-26-2013, 02:58 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,556 posts, read 20,842,572 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hightower72 View Post
The smell. I know, but what can you do about it?

Seriously though, the New York street attitude is something I have yet to find replicated anywhere else in the world. The other cities all have their own style; some may be better cities overall (perhaps Paris or London), but when it comes to that grungy, slightly crusty street cred we all know and love, NYC is very much unique in the world.
I think that's one thing you picked up. That NY attitude and the people. I don't know, they just seem like their own breed, at least long-term New Yorkers who speak with the accent.
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Old 11-26-2013, 11:16 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
27,676 posts, read 28,781,386 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hightower72 View Post
The smell. I know, but what can you do about it?

Seriously though, the New York street attitude is something I have yet to find replicated anywhere else in the world. The other cities all have their own style; some may be better cities overall (perhaps Paris or London), but when it comes to that grungy, slightly crusty street cred we all know and love, NYC is very much unique in the world.
That's really an east coast thing though. You'll find that attitude to some extent in Philadelphia and Boston as well. I think the Italian and Jewish immigrants in these cities were most responsible for creating it. But New York is like the mother goose.

Last edited by BigCityDreamer; 11-26-2013 at 12:24 PM..
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Old 11-26-2013, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Boston, MA
14,488 posts, read 11,311,810 times
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It's because of the skyscrapers. When you are in NYC, the only evidence of the outside world is the minimal amount of sky you see and the shots of New Jersey between the city blocks.
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Old 11-26-2013, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,556 posts, read 20,842,572 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Joshua View Post
It's because of the skyscrapers. When you are in NYC, the only evidence of the outside world is the minimal amount of sky you see and the shots of New Jersey between the city blocks.
I think it's the sheer extent the skyscrapers go for too...it's like one massive canyon for miles and miles. To me, almost all of Manhattan has a 'downtown' feel (that would be downtown in other cities) and it's a huge area for a 'downtown' (NOT the official 'downtown' of the financial district, let's just say central NYC). I mean Manhattan is 10 miles long, that's as long as many metro areas! And it's solid high-rise. Nowhere in the world presents such a vast continuation of high-rises along a grid.
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