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Old 11-27-2013, 09:31 AM
 
13,496 posts, read 18,210,345 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
I guess if you notice those things. I've been to a lot dirtier places so it's not something i noticed. I was just staring up at the skyscrapers and all around me.
I love the references to how "gritty," New York is...ha, both the city and the people are as smooth and soft as a baby's ass compared to the city in the Fifties, Sixties and Seventies.

Postman, you would have fit in then with the your comment above. I used to eat lunch on the park benches in Bryant Park behind the main Library on Fifth Ave., and the ground cover ivy was alive with rustling...and every day one or two of those big numbers would come stepping out of the undergrowth and waddle over to the trash baskets for a snack while I was there. People just kept right on walking along, or reading...I mean, the rat, the cockroach and the pigeon were our sacred totems.

Ah, for the good ol' days in New Yorkers respected nature and lived happily with it.
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Old 11-27-2013, 10:08 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,556 posts, read 20,817,756 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kevxu View Post
I love the references to how "gritty," New York is...ha, both the city and the people are as smooth and soft as a baby's ass compared to the city in the Fifties, Sixties and Seventies.

Postman, you would have fit in then with the your comment above. I used to eat lunch on the park benches in Bryant Park behind the main Library on Fifth Ave., and the ground cover ivy was alive with rustling...and every day one or two of those big numbers would come stepping out of the undergrowth and waddle over to the trash baskets for a snack while I was there. People just kept right on walking along, or reading...I mean, the rat, the cockroach and the pigeon were our sacred totems.

Ah, for the good ol' days in New Yorkers respected nature and lived happily with it.
I saw a few in the subway, but surprisingly none of the streets. Did see quite a few squirrels in Central Park though.
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Old 11-27-2013, 10:43 AM
 
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My coworkers who did a volunteer day gardening at Battery Park could not get over the large number of rats jumping out of their burrows. They're everywhere but particularly rampant in upper and lower Manhattan (not to mention Brooklyn and the Bronx). Majority of the population in NYC - literally the numerical majority - are poor, especially immigrants, and live in less sanitary conditions but this is sensitized from tourists by public/subsidized housing and food stamps.
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Old 11-27-2013, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,556 posts, read 20,817,756 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Forest_Hills_Daddy View Post
My coworkers who did a volunteer day gardening at Battery Park could not get over the large number of rats jumping out of their burrows. They're everywhere but particularly rampant in upper and lower Manhattan (not to mention Brooklyn and the Bronx). Majority of the population in NYC - literally the numerical majority - are poor, especially immigrants, and live in less sanitary conditions but this is sensitized from tourists by public/subsidized housing and food stamps.
Majority? I hardly think so.
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Old 11-27-2013, 12:07 PM
 
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/\/\

YES! The majority of the population is either only slightly above or below the poverty line. And majority of immigrants who come and live there are poor. Have you heard of Brownsville? East New York? Morrissania? Tremont Ave.? Corona? East Elmhurst? People who live there are New Yorkers also and they outnumber the ones who live in Central Park East.

Note also that some of the "hip" places in Manhattan contain housing projects as well as accept Section 8.

There's a lot more to NYC than Central Park.
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Old 11-27-2013, 12:15 PM
 
Location: Østenfor sol og vestenfor måne
17,916 posts, read 24,383,124 times
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There is a lot more to NYC than the skyscrapers of midtown and downtown. Hell, where I lived, the subway was an elevated train.

To most people NYC = the southern 2/3 of Manhattan Island which they assume characterizes not only the whole city, but an area the size of England.
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Old 11-27-2013, 12:18 PM
 
7,296 posts, read 11,872,802 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
There is a lot more to NYC than the skyscrapers of midtown and downtown. Hell, where I lived, the subway was an elevated train.
Correct. Looks like some people could use a pleasant ride on the JMZ from Jamaica, and get off at Cypress Hills and take a lovely stroll to Brownsville on a nice spring day.
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Old 11-27-2013, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Chicago
242 posts, read 369,109 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Forest_Hills_Daddy View Post
/\/\

YES! The majority of the population is either only slightly above or below the poverty line. And majority of immigrants who come and live there are poor. Have you heard of Brownsville? East New York? Morrissania? Tremont Ave.? Corona? East Elmhurst? People who live there are New Yorkers also and they outnumber the ones who live in Central Park East.

Note also that some of the "hip" places in Manhattan contain housing projects as well as accept Section 8.

There's a lot more to NYC than Central Park.
Ohhhh immigrants, even for immigrants I doubt most of them are poor, if you can make it in NYC you can seriously make it anywhere, its very hard living there, its extremely stressful.
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Old 11-27-2013, 01:10 PM
 
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Yes, most of the immigrants are poor especially the working poor who are consigned to low wage jobs with no benefits.
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Old 11-27-2013, 01:39 PM
 
Location: In the heights
37,208 posts, read 39,488,121 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Forest_Hills_Daddy View Post
Correct. Looks like some people could use a pleasant ride on the JMZ from Jamaica, and get off at Cypress Hills and take a lovely stroll to Brownsville on a nice spring day.
I like Cypress Hills. It can actually be somewhat pleasant.

Not so much Brownsville.
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