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Old 12-23-2013, 07:38 AM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
15,844 posts, read 19,787,332 times
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Quote:
To convey the same information, Chinese probably uses the least number of syllables, on average.
I can see that. Makes sense.
Quote:
It already does I have many Cantonese friends and when they speak it, Cantonese sounds so rough and uninviting. It sounds like they're always cursing at each other

Mandarin sounds better except the "szh" and the "dszsch" sounds drive me crazy.

I think Thai sounds the prettiest out of East Asian languages
LOL Yeah it's a really short abrupt language. English must sound like complete jibberish to them. Personally, Japanese is my favorite language in that region.
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Old 12-25-2013, 01:02 PM
 
Location: São Paulo, Brazil
1,406 posts, read 1,413,041 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mach234 View Post
just curious

as a native english speaker, the spanish language sounds like a big run on never ending sentence, very rapid, it seems like you have to use a lot of words to get your point across.

the portuguese language sounds like they use a lot of sh- words, very weird.

the mandarin language doesnt even sound like they use actual words to communicate just a bunch of sounds.

so my question is what does the english language sound like to anyone who learned it as a second language or foreigners?

please keep in mind im not talking about ACCENTS just the language itself.
Keep in mind you perception about Portuguese applies only to the European Portuguese and to the dialect spoken in Rio; this sound doesn't occur so frequently in most of the brazilian dialects or in Angola.

What I perceive as the most easily recognisable feature for the English language is the sound for /r/, completely different of all other European languages.
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Old 12-26-2013, 12:08 PM
 
Location: South Sweden
992 posts, read 1,389,702 times
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For me (a Swede) it sounds like Dutch.
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Old 08-06-2017, 08:00 AM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
9,759 posts, read 5,705,122 times
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We migrated to Australia from Jordan when I was 7. I was a 2nd grader at that time and I did not know a single English word (well, besides 'apple' and 'girl/boy').

When they broadcast news in the English language in Jordan (not sure if it was American or British), I remember it sounding very "exotic", so to say. In my 7 year old ears, English sounded like this "asapasa lasa paraser kerser pars". Sounded sort of like Spanish to me, if I had to pick a similar language.

P.S. Despite being of the same language families and having cognates, English sounds nothing like Dutch and German to me. The latter two are way too guttural and I'd often confused them with Hebrew. I'd say, the closest sounding language to English would probably be Cornish, oddly, a Celtic language (non-Germanic):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UyldsoCWcSE

Last edited by Ethereal; 08-06-2017 at 08:17 AM..
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Old 08-06-2017, 09:40 AM
 
6,129 posts, read 1,615,043 times
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Apparently this is what it sounds like to Italians:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-VsmF9m_Nt8
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Old 08-06-2017, 09:49 AM
 
766 posts, read 238,306 times
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Every sentence sounds like a question.
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Old 08-06-2017, 10:03 AM
 
6,129 posts, read 1,615,043 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoodHombre View Post
Every sentence sounds like a question.
Does it?
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Old 08-06-2017, 10:11 AM
 
766 posts, read 238,306 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Razza94 View Post
Does it?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tqNhEzrWQpY

It's called upward inflection. You don't even need to understand English to detect it.
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Old 08-06-2017, 10:14 AM
 
6,129 posts, read 1,615,043 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoodHombre View Post

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tqNhEzrWQpY

It's called upward inflection. You don't even need to understand English to detect it.
Is that true?
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Old 08-06-2017, 10:22 AM
 
766 posts, read 238,306 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Razza94 View Post
Is that true?
It is true and it's getting worse. I think this is the only aspect of English language that annoys me.

One more example:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3o-Ap1p_ILE
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