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Old 08-06-2017, 09:24 AM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
15,827 posts, read 19,528,325 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Razza94 View Post
Is that true?
It's common for speakers under 50. I'm told I do it sometimes. Drives older people crazy. It becomes more common in people under 40 and it's common to both genders though more pronounced in women.
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Old 08-06-2017, 09:37 AM
 
721 posts, read 212,131 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
It's common for speakers under 50. I'm told I do it sometimes. Drives older people crazy. It becomes more common in people under 40 and it's common to both genders though more pronounced in women.
I've heard that uptalk was invented in California, but it's common among teenager girls all over the country.

I'm not that old, I just wasn't raised that way.

Initially? I thought only young girls talked like that? because they tried to sound pretty and cheerful? But now? It's everybody? everyday? everywhere?

Linguists say upward inflection is contagious. On very rare occasions I do that too because everyone talks like that. Too cheesy to my taste.
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Old 08-06-2017, 09:52 AM
 
6,129 posts, read 1,498,212 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
It's common for speakers under 50. I'm told I do it sometimes. Drives older people crazy. It becomes more common in people under 40 and it's common to both genders though more pronounced in women.
We don't all end sentences with inflections, do we?
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Old 08-06-2017, 11:54 AM
 
721 posts, read 212,131 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Razza94 View Post
We don't all end sentences with inflections, do we?
We? who?
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Old 08-06-2017, 12:03 PM
 
6,129 posts, read 1,498,212 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoodHombre View Post
We? who?
???
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Old 08-06-2017, 12:04 PM
 
721 posts, read 212,131 times
Reputation: 658
Quote:
Originally Posted by Razza94 View Post
???
Oh, I get it.

Maybe it's just an American thing?
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Old 08-06-2017, 12:05 PM
 
6,129 posts, read 1,498,212 times
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These kind of jokes don't work well over the Internet
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Old 08-06-2017, 12:12 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
8,798 posts, read 6,078,500 times
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My mother's first language was French. She said that when she heard English it sounded like someone speaking with a mouthful of mashed potatoes.
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Old 08-06-2017, 01:38 PM
 
Location: France, Bordeaux
279 posts, read 95,751 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
My mother's first language was French. She said that when she heard English it sounded like someone speaking with a mouthful of mashed potatoes.
lol Perfectly well expressed (Even if it applies more to Americans who articulate less). This is the first impression when I discovered English at school, I was 8/9 years old. Today I am much more familiar with English so this is no longer the case, it sounds normal.
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Old 08-06-2017, 01:47 PM
 
6,129 posts, read 1,498,212 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
My mother's first language was French. She said that when she heard English it sounded like someone speaking with a mouthful of mashed potatoes.
That's one description I often here, along with "dogs barking". Although they are very different descriptions of the same sounds.
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