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Old 01-11-2014, 10:09 PM
 
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Well, more easy to figure out and what people notice about places they visited, read about online, and what everyone else told them about those cities and towns all over the world.

Specific characteristics are based on Density Levels, Architecture, Urban Entertainment forms of Culture, Scenery, and How People Feel about those cities world status.



Cities and Towns all over the world appearing much more heavily populated they really are:

Geneva Switzerland: International Prominence of a United Nations headquarters, and CERN Science in Geneva area where the 1st online website of the world is built a few decades ago right between the French/Swiss Border. High Density Levels in almost all neighborhoods over there feels more like a city of 700,000 instead of only 194,555 people.

What other world cities qualify in the same level as Geneva Switzerland?



Cities and Towns all over the world appearing much lower populated than they really are:

Bucharest Romania: I visited the city of Bucharest 3 times in summer months, and didn’t expect desolation in so many places all over the city with few exceptions, and more crowded only in some neighborhoods.

The subway system is severely inadequate for a European city of 1.8 million people, and national or international prominence doesn’t quite reach 1.5-2 million, and feels more like a city of 900,000.


San Jose: I respect technological innovation over there, especially in Computer Information Technology Companies, a Capital of Silicon Valley. However, San Jose does feel very suburban for a city of 1 million people and not urban enough for such a large city. I didn’t mind visiting, and kind of enjoyed a giant suburb city of San Jose.

I don’t know if I would live exactly over there. I probably prefer Inner Richmond neighborhood of San Francisco, some Marin county suburbs in very close proximity to San Francisco, Berkeley, and Napa.


Moscow Russia 11.5 million, Kunming China 3.5-7 million people, Taichung Taiwan 2.7 million, Colombo Sri Lanka 750,000 people, Lagos Nigeria 12 million, and San Antonio Texas 1.3 million might all qualify as cities appearing much lower populated than they really are as major cities.

Last edited by Thepastpresentandfuture; 01-11-2014 at 10:25 PM..
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Old 01-11-2014, 10:30 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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A lot of American cities may have been skylines but for their size downtown pedestrian traffic is really low. Houston is a good example. Oxford, England with a tiny fraction of it's population feels more crowded and vibrant. A lot of Chinese cities seem pretty anonymous considering their size. There are cities of 5 million that are unknown. Brussels and Vienna are two cities that punch above their weight. Singapore too, which is sometimes ranked along with the likes of Hong Kong, Chicago, Shanghai or Paris. Colombo feels pretty small and provincial, in the downtown there are still market stalls made of corrugated iron.
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Old 01-12-2014, 06:24 AM
 
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Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada: a city of 225,000, but feels as quiet, boring and desolate as a town of 10,000 in Poland.
There is a train that passes through the station 3 times a week.

There are no truly authentic Italian restaurants, never mind more ethnic choices. There are very few non-chain grocery stores and even the chain ones have a very limited supply of products.
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Old 01-12-2014, 05:43 PM
 
Location: Long Island/NYC
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Atlantic City, New Jersey feels quite a bit larger than its population (<40,000) would lead one to believe.

Manhattan as well, but on a larger scale, its population is quite high (1.6 million), but 4 million occupy the island during the day.
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Old 01-12-2014, 05:50 PM
 
Location: Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico
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Lausanne seems and feels much more larger, than what it really is. It even has a metro system.
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Old 01-12-2014, 08:24 PM
 
Location: Casca - Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil
606 posts, read 521,386 times
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BalneŠrio Camboriķ in Santa Catarina, Brazil has only 121,900 but it looks like a big and chaotic metropolis. 90% of the city is what you see in this photo, believe, and it's not part of a metropolitan area.
http://www.secturbc.com.br/tb2013/pt...o-camboriu.jpg

Last edited by Rozenn; 01-13-2014 at 12:10 AM.. Reason: Copyright issues
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Old 01-12-2014, 08:39 PM
 
490 posts, read 1,491,752 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
A lot of American cities may have been skylines but for their size downtown pedestrian traffic is really low. Houston is a good example. Oxford, England with a tiny fraction of it's population feels more crowded and vibrant. A lot of Chinese cities seem pretty anonymous considering their size. There are cities of 5 million that are unknown. Brussels and Vienna are two cities that punch above their weight. Singapore too, which is sometimes ranked along with the likes of Hong Kong, Chicago, Shanghai or Paris. Colombo feels pretty small and provincial, in the downtown there are still market stalls made of corrugated iron.
I think some things that are missing in US cities is a Plaza. In Mexico the towns have a plaza and people go out there, sit in the benches or by the water fountain, or by the church. There would be people selling their ice cream, people selling toys, or have a magazine stand somewhere. I think Maybe some Texan or Californian cities may have plazas too. Or maybe it's just the culture that Latin Americans and Southern Europeans tend to get out of the house a lot more. At least when the sun is out.
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Old 01-12-2014, 08:50 PM
 
490 posts, read 1,491,752 times
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This is maybe what US cities need...maybe this would bring more people and movement out.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...as_Durango.jpg

http://ciudadmaderasleon.com/wp-cont...esconocido.jpg

http://static.panoramio.com/photos/large/25638649.jpg

http://www.mexicodesconocido.com.mx/...elia_plaza.jpg
http://callmejagi.files.wordpress.co...10/morelia.jpg

http://static.panoramio.com/photos/original/2666044.jpg
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Old 01-12-2014, 08:53 PM
 
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This is the plaza of my town

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?f...type=3&theater



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Old 01-12-2014, 08:59 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joseanto071 View Post
I think some things that are missing in US cities is a Plaza. In Mexico the towns have a plaza and people go out there, sit in the benches or by the water fountain, or by the church. There would be people selling their ice cream, people selling toys, or have a magazine stand somewhere. I think Maybe some Texan or Californian cities may have plazas too. Or maybe it's just the culture that Latin Americans and Southern Europeans tend to get out of the house a lot more. At least when the sun is out.
I think they have city square/parks, but there just aren't enough people to utilise them. In New York Central Park serves this function, but Union Square is also a meeting place. Times Square is more the shopping/commercial heart of Midtown. I like Olvera plaza/street/Union Station in LA, it's the closest you can get to Mexico north of the border (culturally not geographically speaking of course). Along with maybe Old Town San Diego. I know they're more touristy than East LA but I like the colourful, exotic atmosphere.
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