U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-10-2014, 09:02 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,783 posts, read 15,328,540 times
Reputation: 2833

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
A lot of it is perception and cultural. For Canadians, unaccustomed to an American server saying " uh huh " instead of
" you're welcome " after thanking them, it sounds dismissive and rude, even though that server isn't actually being rude.
Conversely, a Canadian server saying " you're welcome " may just be on auto pilot and it may not be heart felt and actually to the observant sound rude.
In what word is 'uh huh' the same as 'you're welcome'? I thought it meant 'I see', but often in a rather detached, uninterested, bored manner.

Well yes, all of us just say things because it's the thing you say. It's not like always mean it, but it's part of being polite.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-10-2014, 11:44 PM
 
Location: Polderland
1,044 posts, read 824,689 times
Reputation: 1190
Quote:
Originally Posted by rosa surf View Post
Italians on the other hand have no reason to be so rude to tourists. I have nothing against anyone, but I will not return there.
If we're talking war, poverty, lost ones and a tough life, italians have every reason to be little rough on the edge. Just take a look at the poverty in a lot of parts in the big cities and the terror by the maffia going on for decades and Sicillians had to fight invaders for centuries. If we're taking war and poverty for an excuse, every country in Europe has an excuse.

I think it has everything to do with tourism itself. In a lot of places people just don't like all the tourists in their cities. They feel like invaded by another country. People walking in the middle of the small streets blocking traffic, leave thrash everywere, expect you to understand and speak english. Shop- and restaurant owners thrive well by it, but for the rest of the people its a burden, although they know it's good for the city.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2014, 02:02 AM
 
Location: Satellite Of Love
296 posts, read 375,244 times
Reputation: 309
People often forget that there's an empathy/transference/non verbal communication aspect of this, where, even though the physical gestures/language of the person - taken superficially from the POV of a certain culture - are considered rude, the good intent underlying it can still be seen.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2014, 08:39 AM
 
723 posts, read 494,473 times
Reputation: 1014
No excuses for blatant rudeness and bad behavior - none. Understanding the whys does not make it ok. Education, and in the case of tourism, loss of tourist money, may force some changes.

For developing countries like China and VN, perhaps moderate laws regulating public behavior (the gum chewing ban is a bit extreme) similar to those in Singapore may be needed. Given the collective nature of their government and societies, public education regarding appropriate behaviors may gradually curb some of the more offensive behaviors. But mostly, it's a matter of the countries evolving from fairly recent isolation, dominated by a poor peasant-class to becoming more educated and exposed to other cultures where these behaviors are not accepted, nor the norm.

There is a big difference between "cultural" interpretations of rudeness, and basic human definitions of rudeness. This thread has certainly been educational for me as far as the former. Hehe, a Dutch person would have no problem fitting in with my family.

Last edited by mingna; 03-11-2014 at 09:55 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2014, 10:24 AM
 
3,308 posts, read 2,549,792 times
Reputation: 2846
Quote:
Originally Posted by cattledog69 View Post
If we're talking war, poverty, lost ones and a tough life, italians have every reason to be little rough on the edge. Just take a look at the poverty in a lot of parts in the big cities and the terror by the maffia going on for decades and Sicillians had to fight invaders for centuries. If we're taking war and poverty for an excuse, every country in Europe has an excuse.

I think it has everything to do with tourism itself. In a lot of places people just don't like all the tourists in their cities. They feel like invaded by another country. People walking in the middle of the small streets blocking traffic, leave thrash everywere, expect you to understand and speak english. Shop- and restaurant owners thrive well by it, but for the rest of the people its a burden, although they know it's good for the city.
Yeah, but I have been to ALOT of countries and I think tourists should be treated with respect. Also, I had worked very hard to save up my money to visit Europe. I was a fulltime student, worked 3 part-time jobs. I was treated poorly for very insane reasons- respectfully asking for directions in Italian, and many other things. Funny thing is, the friend I went with had already been to Italy and told me she didn't want to go again specifically for that reason! It is the only country that has left a sour taste in my mouth.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2014, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
11,351 posts, read 7,825,285 times
Reputation: 6368
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
In what word is 'uh huh' the same as 'you're welcome'? I thought it meant 'I see', but often in a rather detached, uninterested, bored manner.

Well yes, all of us just say things because it's the thing you say. It's not like always mean it, but it's part of being polite.
It doesn't sound the same to us, but in many places in the U.S. you get a " uh huh " instead of you're welcome. Not to say some don't say you're welcome, and it may vary depending on what area you are in the U.S.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2014, 08:27 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,783 posts, read 15,328,540 times
Reputation: 2833
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
It doesn't sound the same to us, but in many places in the U.S. you get a " uh huh " instead of you're welcome. Not to say some don't say you're welcome, and it may vary depending on what area you are in the U.S.
Yeah I would consider that rude. You don't say 'uh huh' instead of 'you're welcome' here. I found in the US a lot of customer service people for jobs that didn't require tips were downright unpleasant and rude.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2014, 09:24 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
11,351 posts, read 7,825,285 times
Reputation: 6368
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Yeah I would consider that rude. You don't say 'uh huh' instead of 'you're welcome' here. I found in the US a lot of customer service people for jobs that didn't require tips were downright unpleasant and rude.
Well, the US like Canada and Australia are big places and what holds true in one part of the country doesn't in another.
I'm sure if a waitress in a roadside cafe in Northern California smiled and said "uh huh " you wouldn't really think she was being rude.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-12-2014, 12:05 AM
 
Location: Polderland
1,044 posts, read 824,689 times
Reputation: 1190
Quote:
Originally Posted by rosa surf View Post
Yeah, but I have been to ALOT of countries and I think tourists should be treated with respect. Also, I had worked very hard to save up my money to visit Europe. I was a fulltime student, worked 3 part-time jobs. I was treated poorly for very insane reasons- respectfully asking for directions in Italian, and many other things. Funny thing is, the friend I went with had already been to Italy and told me she didn't want to go again specifically for that reason! It is the only country that has left a sour taste in my mouth.
I was not trying to give them an excuse, but trying to understand were it comes from. I absolutely understand that. I've never been in Italy for a long time, only a few days passing through, but i had those experiences in France. Bad food (order a steak and you'll get a big chump of fat), people rolling their eyes like your stupid when you try your best speaking french, turn their back on you and just walk away when you ask something in english.

But France is a big country and in other parts i experienced the opposite. Like very helpfull, friendly, try to use a few words english if you're struggling with the language, showing directions. That was allways in less touristy places, were people are a bit more relaxed and in their normal french lifestyle.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-12-2014, 04:37 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,783 posts, read 15,328,540 times
Reputation: 2833
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Well, the US like Canada and Australia are big places and what holds true in one part of the country doesn't in another.
I'm sure if a waitress in a roadside cafe in Northern California smiled and said "uh huh " you wouldn't really think she was being rude.
Maybe it's a cultural thing but here if you said 'uh huh' it would be like saying 'yeah yeah, I don't care/you're boring me' when saying 'I understand you.' I also noticed the rudeness to be more prevalent among certain racial groups in the States, but my sample was not large so I am not going to make judgements about those groups as a whole, just what i observed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top