U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-13-2014, 04:16 PM
 
Location: East coast
613 posts, read 845,096 times
Reputation: 304

Advertisements

The legacy of slavery is obviously very well known to Americans, but actually further south, in the Caribbean and tropical Latin America, there were huge numbers of people descended from African slaves so the US was only just a part of a huge trans-Atlantic system of forced relocation and enslavement. Not just Spanish, Portuguese but others like the French and British in this region did this.

I have met people unaware that black Jamaicans or Haitians, or black Brazilians shared a legacy of the trans-Atlantic trade than black (US) Americans did, during the colonial age. I have even known people to assume Caribbean blacks were just native islanders the way Fijians are!

Do you think many people (let's just say excluding Latin Americans and Caribbeans themselves) know about the legacy of slavery in this part of the world?

Is it equally as well-known as the US legacy of slavery or not, to those unfamiliar to the region(s), would you say?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-13-2014, 04:22 PM
 
Location: Viña del Mar, Chile
16,416 posts, read 25,206,536 times
Reputation: 16464
Would probably depend on how interested the person is in history. Tons of average people have very little grasp on [relatively] recent history.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-13-2014, 04:29 PM
 
Location: East coast
613 posts, read 845,096 times
Reputation: 304
I'm actually somewhat curious as to those who are unaware of African slavery's legacy in those reasons, where they think Black Latin Americans or Caribbeans come from?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-13-2014, 04:47 PM
 
Location: Viña del Mar, Chile
16,416 posts, read 25,206,536 times
Reputation: 16464
I don't know. There are plenty of people who also don't realize the impact that other Africans had on slavery. They also don't realize that the freed black people with lighter skin went back to Liberia and enslaved the darker skinned blacks.

There are many parts of history that simply point the finger at the big bad white people, but it was oftentimes much more complex.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-27-2014, 02:12 AM
 
334 posts, read 337,896 times
Reputation: 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by markovian process View Post
The legacy of slavery is obviously very well known to Americans, but actually further south, in the Caribbean and tropical Latin America, there were huge numbers of people descended from African slaves so the US was only just a part of a huge trans-Atlantic system of forced relocation and enslavement. Not just Spanish, Portuguese but others like the French and British in this region did this.

I have met people unaware that black Jamaicans or Haitians, or black Brazilians shared a legacy of the trans-Atlantic trade than black (US) Americans did, during the colonial age. I have even known people to assume Caribbean blacks were just native islanders the way Fijians are!

Do you think many people (let's just say excluding Latin Americans and Caribbeans themselves) know about the legacy of slavery in this part of the world?

Is it equally as well-known as the US legacy of slavery or not, to those unfamiliar to the region(s), would you say?
People seem to forget that all human beings have been oppressors and all have been oppressed and slavery goes back to the earliest of mankind and times. Mass slavery in Africa was not started by Europeans, but by Arabs. It doesn't excuse Europeans, but we can't have amnesia to the other slave trade routes. Christianity and Islam were imposed. Although Christianity had already been in Africa before Europeans.

Arab slave trade and Islamic slave trade has gone on since ancient times and still goes on today throughout Africa, North Africa, Middle East, and Asia etc.

People seem to also have many misconceptions about slavery. Slavery was not racial. It was not based on race.

More slaves went to Latin America and the Caribbean than what is the USA.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-27-2014, 02:14 AM
 
334 posts, read 337,896 times
Reputation: 61
Many Irish were brutally victimized and forced into slavery abroad. They often had it worse than the Africans enslaved.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-27-2014, 11:03 AM
 
25,060 posts, read 22,112,973 times
Reputation: 11576
Quote:
Originally Posted by markovian process View Post
The legacy of slavery is obviously very well known to Americans, but actually further south, in the Caribbean and tropical Latin America, there were huge numbers of people descended from African slaves so the US was only just a part of a huge trans-Atlantic system of forced relocation and enslavement. Not just Spanish, Portuguese but others like the French and British in this region did this.

I have met people unaware that black Jamaicans or Haitians, or black Brazilians shared a legacy of the trans-Atlantic trade than black (US) Americans did, during the colonial age. I have even known people to assume Caribbean blacks were just native islanders the way Fijians are!

Do you think many people (let's just say excluding Latin Americans and Caribbeans themselves) know about the legacy of slavery in this part of the world?

Is it equally as well-known as the US legacy of slavery or not, to those unfamiliar to the region(s), would you say?
Anybody from Latin America knows full well about slavery in the region
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-28-2014, 03:57 AM
 
334 posts, read 337,896 times
Reputation: 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
Anybody from Latin America knows full well about slavery in the region
A lot of people act brand new about the dynamics and magnitude of slavery in Latin America though. I think both people from Latin America and people from outside of Latin America are not always well informed on it.

Plus slavery occurred around the globe.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-28-2014, 04:00 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,783 posts, read 15,339,870 times
Reputation: 2833
Yes only a small minority of all the slaves brought from Africa to the New World ended up in the United States. The vast majority ended up in Brazil and the Caribbean.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-28-2014, 10:06 AM
 
25,060 posts, read 22,112,973 times
Reputation: 11576
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Yes only a small minority of all the slaves brought from Africa to the New World ended up in the United States. The vast majority ended up in Brazil and the Caribbean.
Oddly enough, not on my island. Very few slaves in Puerto Rico. The vast majority of the population is mestizo, not mulatto or black, like the rest of my neighbors
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top