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View Poll Results: Which feels bigger to you?
Tokyo 116 73.42%
New York 42 26.58%
Voters: 158. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 04-09-2014, 07:50 PM
 
Location: In the heights
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
That looks less crowded than Penn Station at rush hour. There's space between the people. More from poor design, but still it doesn't look that bad. This before July 4th weekend, so it's a bit extreme.


New York Penn Station - VERY CROWDED - YouTube

or how about this photo?

New York City Subway Ridership Reaches Highest Level Since 1949 – Skift

video of NYC moving


New York Day - YouTube
Penn Station is actually terribly designed. Shinjuku Station has a couple hundred of exits and is generally a lot more open and porous.

Match Shinjuku's ridership with Penn Stations design and you can get yourself a nice little riot.
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Old 04-09-2014, 08:03 PM
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Location: Western Massachusetts
45,737 posts, read 39,610,543 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post

Match Shinjuku's ridership with Penn Stations design and you can get yourself a nice little riot.
In NYC. Would Japanese riot?
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Old 04-09-2014, 08:57 PM
 
Location: In the heights
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
In NYC. Would Japanese riot?
They would probably think bad thoughts about everyone or project their displeasure with the situation upon their own personal failings. And maybe someone will snap.
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Old 04-27-2014, 09:54 PM
 
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Although Tokyo is a good bit larger in population and geographical size, peak intensity NYC beats Tokyo and it is more of a 24 hour city. New York seems to pack more into a smaller space and, paradoxically, feels bigger.

I think it's impossible to disregard diversity when it comes to how big a place "feels." Tokyo really surprised me with how little diversity it offered. I saw a handful of white people(quite a few were tourists), a few black people( a couple "Jamaican" guys offered to show me around in Shinjuku), and I saw a couple of what I presumed were Turks running doner stands in Ueno. I also saw a couple Indian restaurants, but no Indians. I see more diversity on a single ride on the DC Metro than I saw in two days in Tokyo it seems.

Don't get me wrong. Tokyo is very impressive and it's like stepping 20 years into the future in some aspects. But it's also like stepping into the past, being used to interacting with people of diverse backgrounds on a daily basis.
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Old 04-28-2014, 03:36 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DTL3000 View Post
Although Tokyo is a good bit larger in population and geographical size, peak intensity NYC beats Tokyo and it is more of a 24 hour city. New York seems to pack more into a smaller space and, paradoxically, feels bigger.

I think it's impossible to disregard diversity when it comes to how big a place "feels." Tokyo really surprised me with how little diversity it offered. I saw a handful of white people(quite a few were tourists), a few black people( a couple "Jamaican" guys offered to show me around in Shinjuku), and I saw a couple of what I presumed were Turks running doner stands in Ueno. I also saw a couple Indian restaurants, but no Indians. I see more diversity on a single ride on the DC Metro than I saw in two days in Tokyo it seems.

Don't get me wrong. Tokyo is very impressive and it's like stepping 20 years into the future in some aspects. But it's also like stepping into the past, being used to interacting with people of diverse backgrounds on a daily basis.
Well Tokyo isn't really known for being ethnically diverse. One could say the same for a lot of megacities, like Shanghai, Beijing, Manila, Jakarta, Dhaka, Delhi, Mumbai, Istanbul, Moscow, Buenos Aires, Mexico City.etc.
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Old 04-28-2014, 06:20 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Well Tokyo isn't really known for being ethnically diverse. One could say the same for a lot of megacities, like Shanghai, Beijing, Manila, Jakarta, Dhaka, Delhi, Mumbai, Istanbul, Moscow, Buenos Aires, Mexico City.etc.
Out of all of those, I've only been to Istanbul so far but it struck me as very diverse. It is after all, the crossroads between Europe and Asia and was the seat of the last huge multi-ethnic empire besides the British. I saw plenty of darker complected Turks and Arabs but I also saw a lot of people who could pass for northern/western European(which is my heritage). I had several people try to engage me in conversational Turkish so I must assume more that a few native born Turks might pass for northern European.

As far as Moscow, I haven't visited but I have been to St. Petersburg. It was surprisingly diverse with a fair amount of east Asians and a good number of central Asians/Caucasians(people actually from the Caucasian region, not "white" people). I'd assume Moscow would have a similar makeup or may even be more diverse since it's the national capital.

The rest I really can't say either way, but I wouldn't be surprised if several weren't really all that diverse.
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Old 04-28-2014, 06:25 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DTL3000 View Post
Out of all of those, I've only been to Istanbul so far but it struck me as very diverse. It is after all, the crossroads between Europe and Asia and was the seat of the last huge multi-ethnic empire besides the British. I saw plenty of darker complected Turks and Arabs but I also saw a lot of people who could pass for northern/western European(which is my heritage). I had several people try to engage me in conversational Turkish so I must assume more that a few native born Turks might pass for northern European.

As far as Moscow, I haven't visited but I have been to St. Petersburg. It was surprisingly diverse with a fair amount of east Asians and a good number of central Asians/Caucasians(people actually from the Caucasian region, not "white" people). I'd assume Moscow would have a similar makeup or may even be more diverse since it's the national capital.

The rest I really can't say either way, but I wouldn't be surprised if several weren't really all that diverse.
Well I mean in terms of ethnicity, not just phenotypical variation, and residents not just tourists. Judging by the crowds I saw in Italy, I could say Italy is diverse with lots of Chinese etc lol.
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Old 04-28-2014, 07:16 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Well I mean in terms of ethnicity, not just phenotypical variation, and residents not just tourists. Judging by the crowds I saw in Italy, I could say Italy is diverse with lots of Chinese etc lol.
And ethnic variation amongst the people living, and who have lived, in Istanbul is exactly what I'm taking about. Istanbul has had mosques next to churches next to synagogues for centuries. Nobody in their right mind would consider it not to be diverse.

Italy, at least Rome, has a fair amount of Ethiopians along with Arabs.
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Old 04-28-2014, 07:41 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DTL3000 View Post
And ethnic variation amongst the people living, and who have lived, in Istanbul is exactly what I'm taking about. Istanbul has had mosques next to churches next to synagogues for centuries. Nobody in their right mind would consider it not to be diverse.

Italy, at least Rome, has a fair amount of Ethiopians along with Arabs.
Ethiopians? News to me.

Either way, they don't feel culturally diverse like NYC, London.etc.
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Old 06-11-2014, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Astoria, Queens, you know the scene
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronnie101 View Post
New York easily.


It really is the center of the planet.

Tokyo is the only place on the planet that makes me feel relieved when I come back to the slower pace of life in NYC. Clearly you haven't been to Tokyo.
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