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Old 03-22-2014, 03:02 AM
 
Location: Westminster, London
878 posts, read 1,119,228 times
Reputation: 697

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Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
Retail sales are going up.
The official figures:


Wikimedia Commons

The reality:

Everything must go: There's a flood of store closings - Mar. 7, 2014
Retail Store Closures Pick Up - Business Insider
J.C. Penney reports Q2 loss of $586 million
Testosterone Pit - Home - Walmart International: Lousy Economies 'Everywhere We*Operate'
What Recovery? Sears And J.C. Penney Are DYING
http://urbanland.uli.org/news/soluti...n-strip-malls/
RadioShack to close up to 1,100 stores
WICS NewsChannel 20 :: News - Top Stories - Staples, Radio Shack Announce Mass Store Closings
Staples, OfficeMax, Office Depot -- do office-supplies chains have a future? - Behind the Storefront - MarketWatch
Safeway to Be Bought by Cerberus

The rebuttal: E-commerce is killing bricks and mortar retail.

The reality: E-commerce constitutes only 6% of total retail volume, and is not rising sufficiently to counter declining street retail.



I think Jim Quinn summarises it best: http://www.theburningplatform.com/20...-death-rattle/


Quote:
Retiring baby boomers have a big impact on the labor force participation rate.

H/T Bureau of Labor Statistics, Z/H


Quote:
Food stamp usage slightly went down
Food stamp president: Enrollment up 70 percent under Obama - Washington Times


Source: http://www.cato.org/blog/food-stamp-price-tag-rising


Or more humourously:


Source: Are You Smarter Than A Third Grade Economist?
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Old 03-24-2014, 03:09 AM
 
Location: Satellite Of Love
296 posts, read 375,244 times
Reputation: 309
I think people fail to appreciate the seismic shift in the balance of power that came around with the (ongoing) 2008 financial crisis. You can blame the mainstream media for underreporting the impact this has had on the older powers, the US and Europe, and overestimating the long term prospects for either.

Just read some of the defensive comments above regarding the future status of the USA when it is clear to see all around, domestically and in terms of its influence and relations abroad, that its era of tenuous hegemony (not even a century and most of that as part of the cold war polarization) is quickly coming to a close.

That is not to say that Russia and China are economic panaceas (a system of kleptocratic oil baronies in the former, a worrying credit bubble in the latter) but they now know that western banks are insolvent and are busy bringing in a new paradigm in global finance and global politics. That's why people, lulled into a delusional normalcy bias, are so stunned by Putin's move to annex the Crimea. He disregards the stock market intra-day fluctuations and the political turbulence that arise from this, knowing fully well that this is short term. He keeps his eye on the long term where he sees the return of Russia to the global stage.

His move in Ukraine balances economic, political and military influences to bring around a desired effect - the mark of true leadership, as sad as it is to say, and has led to his approval ratings soaring while exposing how helpless and incompetent Obama and the leadership of Western Europe are. Meanwhile in the USA, the leadership is fixated upon immediate or short term sustainability, kicking the economic can of chronically unsustainable and exponentially increasing debt down the road to a greater disaster in the years ahead.

As Chuck Missler puts it, the people of the USA failed an IQ test when they elected a virtual unknown into the White House in 5 years ago, and then went ahead and did the same again a few years later. They now pay the price for it in the gravest terms through the implosion of civil liberties, living standards and political influence abroad. When you want George W back as president, you know something is desperately wrong with the status quo.

Last edited by BennyBucks; 03-24-2014 at 03:45 AM..
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Old 03-24-2014, 08:00 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
15,664 posts, read 18,206,684 times
Reputation: 11163
Quote:
Originally Posted by BennyBucks View Post
That is not to say that Russia and China are economic panaceas (a system of kleptocratic oil baronies in the former, a worrying credit bubble in the latter) but they now know that western banks are insolvent and are busy bringing in a new paradigm in global finance and global politics. That's why people, lulled into a delusional normalcy bias, are so stunned by Putin's move to annex the Crimea. He disregards the stock market intra-day fluctuations and the political turbulence that arise from this, knowing fully well that this is short term. He keeps his eye on the long term where he sees the return of Russia to the global stage.
LOL. Putin in going to get his ass whooped one of these days.

The timing just isn't right yet.
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Old 03-29-2014, 10:58 AM
 
2,143 posts, read 1,040,079 times
Reputation: 546
Quote:
Originally Posted by BennyBucks View Post
I think people fail to appreciate the seismic shift in the balance of power that came around with the (ongoing) 2008 financial crisis. You can blame the mainstream media for underreporting the impact this has had on the older powers, the US and Europe, and overestimating the long term prospects for either.

Just read some of the defensive comments above regarding the future status of the USA when it is clear to see all around, domestically and in terms of its influence and relations abroad, that its era of tenuous hegemony (not even a century and most of that as part of the cold war polarization) is quickly coming to a close.

That is not to say that Russia and China are economic panaceas (a system of kleptocratic oil baronies in the former, a worrying credit bubble in the latter) but they now know that western banks are insolvent and are busy bringing in a new paradigm in global finance and global politics. That's why people, lulled into a delusional normalcy bias, are so stunned by Putin's move to annex the Crimea. He disregards the stock market intra-day fluctuations and the political turbulence that arise from this, knowing fully well that this is short term. He keeps his eye on the long term where he sees the return of Russia to the global stage.

His move in Ukraine balances economic, political and military influences to bring around a desired effect - the mark of true leadership, as sad as it is to say, and has led to his approval ratings soaring while exposing how helpless and incompetent Obama and the leadership of Western Europe are. Meanwhile in the USA, the leadership is fixated upon immediate or short term sustainability, kicking the economic can of chronically unsustainable and exponentially increasing debt down the road to a greater disaster in the years ahead.

As Chuck Missler puts it, the people of the USA failed an IQ test when they elected a virtual unknown into the White House in 5 years ago, and then went ahead and did the same again a few years later. They now pay the price for it in the gravest terms through the implosion of civil liberties, living standards and political influence abroad. When you want George W back as president, you know something is desperately wrong with the status quo.
Did you really expect the West to go to war with Russia for Crimea?
For the record, Bush didn't do so with Russia when Russia formally invaded Georgia in 2008.
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Old 03-29-2014, 11:05 AM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
21,136 posts, read 21,121,261 times
Reputation: 23163
I think our clout left when we gave up our sovereignty to the United Nations. You cannot be a world power if some other political entity has power over you. BIG MISTAKE! I find it appalling that U. S. citizens are going to the United Nations tattling on us and asking them to intervene in our business. Nobody but a traitor would ever do that. How dare they?
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Old 03-29-2014, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Windsor, Ontario, Canada
11,269 posts, read 12,474,250 times
Reputation: 13422
Quote:
Originally Posted by NCN View Post
I think our clout left when we gave up our sovereignty to the United Nations. You cannot be a world power if some other political entity has power over you. BIG MISTAKE! I find it appalling that U. S. citizens are going to the United Nations tattling on us and asking them to intervene in our business. Nobody but a traitor would ever do that. How dare they?


I know, right? Just imagin how many wars America could be in if it wasn't for that meddling United Nations!
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Old 03-29-2014, 12:22 PM
 
Location: Satellite Of Love
296 posts, read 375,244 times
Reputation: 309
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daywalk View Post
Did you really expect the West to go to war with Russia for Crimea?
For the record, Bush didn't do so with Russia when Russia formally invaded Georgia in 2008.
Obama shouldn't have meddled in Ukraine in the first instance.

Criticism of his handling of the crisis that followed isn't a complaint about the fact that he didn't declare war. There's more to diplomacy than declaring war on a whim when someone upsets you.
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Old 03-29-2014, 01:32 PM
 
Location: Scotland
7,972 posts, read 9,722,762 times
Reputation: 4069
Quote:
Originally Posted by BennyBucks View Post
I think people fail to appreciate the seismic shift in the balance of power that came around with the (ongoing) 2008 financial crisis. You can blame the mainstream media for underreporting the impact this has had on the older powers, the US and Europe, and overestimating the long term prospects for either.

Just read some of the defensive comments above regarding the future status of the USA when it is clear to see all around, domestically and in terms of its influence and relations abroad, that its era of tenuous hegemony (not even a century and most of that as part of the cold war polarization) is quickly coming to a close.

That is not to say that Russia and China are economic panaceas (a system of kleptocratic oil baronies in the former, a worrying credit bubble in the latter) but they now know that western banks are insolvent and are busy bringing in a new paradigm in global finance and global politics. That's why people, lulled into a delusional normalcy bias, are so stunned by Putin's move to annex the Crimea. He disregards the stock market intra-day fluctuations and the political turbulence that arise from this, knowing fully well that this is short term. He keeps his eye on the long term where he sees the return of Russia to the global stage.

His move in Ukraine balances economic, political and military influences to bring around a desired effect - the mark of true leadership, as sad as it is to say, and has led to his approval ratings soaring while exposing how helpless and incompetent Obama and the leadership of Western Europe are. Meanwhile in the USA, the leadership is fixated upon immediate or short term sustainability, kicking the economic can of chronically unsustainable and exponentially increasing debt down the road to a greater disaster in the years ahead.

As Chuck Missler puts it, the people of the USA failed an IQ test when they elected a virtual unknown into the White House in 5 years ago, and then went ahead and did the same again a few years later. They now pay the price for it in the gravest terms through the implosion of civil liberties, living standards and political influence abroad. When you want George W back as president, you know something is desperately wrong with the status quo.
Great post.
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Old 03-29-2014, 02:18 PM
 
2,143 posts, read 1,040,079 times
Reputation: 546
Quote:
Originally Posted by BennyBucks View Post
Obama shouldn't have meddled in Ukraine in the first instance.

Criticism of his handling of the crisis that followed isn't a complaint about the fact that he didn't declare war. There's more to diplomacy than declaring war on a whim when someone upsets you.
Actually they signed the agreement below, and Russia occupied the entire Crimea before the referendum was held. If Obama didn't say a single word about the crisis I am pretty sure more people will slam him.

The Budapest Memorandum on Security Assurances is a political agreement signed in Budapest, Hungary on 5 December 1994, providing security assurances by its signatories relating to Ukraine's accession to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons. The Memorandum was originally signed by three nuclear powers, the Russian Federation, the United States of America, and the United Kingdom. China and France gave somewhat weaker individual assurances in separate documents.
The memorandum included security assurances against threats or use of force against the territorial integrity or political independence of Ukraine as well as those of Belarus and Kazakhstan. As a result Ukraine gave up the world's third largest nuclear weapons stockpile between 1994 and 1996.
Following the 2014 Crimean crisis, the U.S., Canada and the U.K. all separately stated that Russian involvement is in breach of its obligations to Ukraine under the Budapest Memorandum, and in clear violation of Ukrainian sovereignty and territorial integrity.
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Old 03-29-2014, 02:25 PM
 
Location: Westminster, London
878 posts, read 1,119,228 times
Reputation: 697
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daywalk View Post
Actually they signed the agreement below, and Russia occupied the entire Crimea before the referendum was held. If Obama didn't say a single word about the crisis I am pretty sure more people will slam him.

The Budapest Memorandum on Security Assurances is a political agreement signed in Budapest, Hungary on 5 December 1994, providing security assurances by its signatories relating to Ukraine's accession to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons. The Memorandum was originally signed by three nuclear powers, the Russian Federation, the United States of America, and the United Kingdom. China and France gave somewhat weaker individual assurances in separate documents.
The memorandum included security assurances against threats or use of force against the territorial integrity or political independence of Ukraine as well as those of Belarus and Kazakhstan. As a result Ukraine gave up the world's third largest nuclear weapons stockpile between 1994 and 1996.
Following the 2014 Crimean crisis, the U.S., Canada and the U.K. all separately stated that Russian involvement is in breach of its obligations to Ukraine under the Budapest Memorandum, and in clear violation of Ukrainian sovereignty and territorial integrity.
I'm pretty sure the following is what is being referred to when people complain about the US "meddling in the Ukraine":

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