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Old 01-21-2021, 09:27 PM
 
167 posts, read 33,836 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smool View Post
When I say karst pinnacles I mean like this (there are lots of areas of karst in the world - the ones in China cover an area of France and Spain combined), but not many that are fractured and eroded into the pinnacle form like this, and in several different types, that cover vast areas of southern China. We're talking entire landscapes of multiple forms from 17ft to 7000ft

Zhangjiajie

www.worldfortravel.com


www.michaelyamashi ta.com

Guilin

www.shanghaihighlights.com


Collectingwonder.com




Huangshan

Global Geoparks Network

http://mobilite.mobi


Wulong

www.jucktion.com


Yunnan Shilin

http://all-that-is-interesting.com

http://www.123rf.com/photo_5961681_a...nan-china.html


Yellow River Shilin

http://www6.933wan.com/

Enshi

http://adventureblog.nationalgeographic.com

Tianmen

www.thepoortraveler.net


www.ykitai.com

Luoping

http://thefabweb.com

https://aconteceunachina.files.wordpress.com

http://iliketowastemytime.com


Danxia

http://photo.chinatravel.com

www.sinaimg.cn


Toshuk Tagh

www.farwestchina.com

http://images.nationalgeographic.com


Huashan

http://www.dgrin.com/showthread.php?t=135544

SSQQ

Yungang

WESTERN GEOSPATIALS: SinkHoles


They also make for the biggest caverns, cave systems, shafts, natural arches and sinkholes due to the soft acidity of such a vast area:


http://blog.grupoeuropa.com

www.christianoz.com


The world's largest cavern has it's own weather system and cloud factory:


www.newscientist.com


1700ft cave shaft

http://img.thesun.co.uk


Erwang has it's own forest and weather system in it's sinkholes


http://i.dailymail.co.uk

赌网站app下载-王者荣耀半决赛外国解说视频

Tiankeng

http://i.dailymail.co.uk

Tianmen

| Amazing Places | - Amazing Places on Earth, Places to visit
Having been to southeast China (a beautiful place) these pictures definitely exaggerate the apparent scale of some of these landforms a bit. Not sure how, but the red flag is that the pictures look more spectacular than a lot of these areas look in person, which should never be the case.

Those pictures of Guilin, Wulong, and Tianmen are particularly exaggerated - non of the karts pinnacles in Guilin look that narrow and tall. They look more like big hills in person - very pretty, but if you've seen the US southwest, you've seen it all
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Old 01-28-2021, 04:09 PM
 
47 posts, read 19,488 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by magicinterest View Post
You're kind of getting down to differentiating landscapes by naming differences in the tiniest abiotic factors to embellish your lists of landscapes the US "lacks".

The US has loesslands all over the Midwest

The US has atolls, way more than China does - how can you argue China has atolls but the US doesn't?

The US has tropical rainforest in Hawaii - it has tropical moist forests in Florida. It has tropical-adjacent forests in certain areas of the Gulf Coast, particularly in Texas. Don't know how you're acting like it doesn't. "A case can be made for Kauai" - um - if those aren't tropical rainforests, what are they to you? Why are you bizarrely holding out on saying the US has tropical rainforest when it objectively does? "A case can be made", no, a case doesn't need to be made, they are.

The US has bamboo forests, and it's own species of bamboo. They aren't as widespread.

The US has high plateaus all tf over the place - that's the literal definition of the Colorado plateau. Are you really this ignorant?

Karst features are found in abundance in areas of the east and southeast - namely West Virginia and Arkansas.

Rhododendron forests all over the US southeast, come on, please stop with this nonsense.

"stepped rice paddy landscape"? That's a cultural practice unique to Asia. It's a man made landscape, for christ's sake

"ice deserts"? There isn't really such thing. Alaska has polar deserts - China doesn't.

What is a "red earth landscape"? You're embellishing your list. Are you referring to red soil? Because the US has tons of that - everywhere. It has more red sandstone landscapes as well.
I agree with most of your post, but there are a few observations on your assertions.

1. Tropical rainforest climate "as well as tropical monsoon and tropical savanna" do exist in both Florida and Hawaii, however climate should not be confused with types of vegetation or biomes. Using the Holdridge model of vegetation what you find in both Southern Florida and hawaii is Subtropical vegetation.
On this I believe Koppen falls short in describing tropical climates "as well as dry climates", there are a few moddified models that make the distinction between tropical and equatorial, with tropical climate having the conditions for subtropical vegetation to exist and equatorial climate having the conditions for tropical vegetation to grow.

2. Polar deserts: What you find in alaska is tundra, not a polar desert "unless you are reffering to glacier formed on the mountains, but that is different than a true polar climate
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Old 02-10-2021, 07:08 AM
 
167 posts, read 33,836 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jfbatemanz View Post
I agree with most of your post, but there are a few observations on your assertions.

Tropical rainforest climate "as well as tropical monsoon and tropical savanna" do exist in both Florida and Hawaii, however climate should not be confused with types of vegetation or biomes. Using the Holdridge model of vegetation what you find in both Southern Florida and Hawaii is Subtropical vegetation.
That makes zero sense - if the Holdridge model indeed says that, then it's inconsistent and can be dismissed offhand here - Hawaii lies below the tropic of cancer. None of it's vegetation is remotely seasonal. It has a tropical climate. If the forests of far southern China are tropical in nature, than the forests in the southern Florida and Hawaii are tropical rainforests. I get nitpicking Florida - but calling Hawaiian forests "subtropical" when they're listed as tropical rainforest by the WWF? That's stupid. There is nothing else to call them but subtropical. They aren't climatically, geographically, or ecologically "subtropical" at all.

Tropical vegetation is not confined to the equatorial region at all, so that doesn't make sense.

EDIT: Looking at the Holdridge Life Zones, it appears that nowhere in China is labeled as having "tropical forest" either, despite the presence of legitimate tropical forests in southern Yunnan and on Hainan island. This seems to be a quirk of this classification.

The vegetation of southern Florida is not deciduous at all, and tropical/subtropical species predominate. Holdridge labels forests in southern Virginia and in Arkansas subtropical.

If the climate of southern Florida is tropical, so is the ecology. You don't have coconut palms in stranglers figs without true tropical forest.

Alaska has a polar climate in it's north. You have, essentially, subarctic/arctic desert in areas of middle Alaska. The phrase "ice desert" doesn't really make sense.
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Old 02-13-2021, 12:48 PM
 
157 posts, read 56,868 times
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The short answer - NO - it's not the most diverse, but it's one of the most diverse.
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Old 02-13-2021, 01:18 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kingsdl76 View Post
The short answer - NO - it's not the most diverse, but it's one of the most diverse.
What would you say is the most diverse then? The only one I can think of that matches it, in geographic diversity would be China.
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Old 02-16-2021, 12:44 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by magicinterest View Post
That makes zero sense - if the Holdridge model indeed says that, then it's inconsistent and can be dismissed offhand here - Hawaii lies below the tropic of cancer. None of it's vegetation is remotely seasonal. It has a tropical climate. If the forests of far southern China are tropical in nature, than the forests in the southern Florida and Hawaii are tropical rainforests. I get nitpicking Florida - but calling Hawaiian forests "subtropical" when they're listed as tropical rainforest by the WWF? That's stupid. There is nothing else to call them but subtropical. They aren't climatically, geographically, or ecologically "subtropical" at all.

Tropical vegetation is not confined to the equatorial region at all, so that doesn't make sense.

EDIT: Looking at the Holdridge Life Zones, it appears that nowhere in China is labeled as having "tropical forest" either, despite the presence of legitimate tropical forests in southern Yunnan and on Hainan island. This seems to be a quirk of this classification.

The vegetation of southern Florida is not deciduous at all, and tropical/subtropical species predominate. Holdridge labels forests in southern Virginia and in Arkansas subtropical.

If the climate of southern Florida is tropical, so is the ecology. You don't have coconut palms in stranglers figs without true tropical forest.

Alaska has a polar climate in it's north. You have, essentially, subarctic/arctic desert in areas of middle Alaska. The phrase "ice desert" doesn't really make sense.
1. “That makes zero sense - if the Holdridge model indeed says that, then it's inconsistent and can be dismissed offhand here”

Why is that? Both Holdridge and Koppen are valid “not perfect” systems to classify climate “koppen” and biomes “Holdridge”, the difference regarding the usage of the Word “Tropical” is the temperature limits each model employ.
For Koppen a tropical climate needs all 12 months of the year have average temperatures of 18 °C, for Holdridge the temperatura to be considered a tropical biome is 24 °C. Subtropical vegetation would need a temperatura ranging from 18 °C to 24 °C. There are some koppen moddified models that make the distinction between tropical and equatorial that take the same approach of Holdridge in temperature “The terminology changes: equatorial climate = tropical vegetation, Tropical climate = Sub tropical vegetation”


2. “Hawaii lies below the tropic of cancer. None of it's vegetation is remotely seasonal”


Irrelevant, Florida is north of the tropic of cáncer and yet it has “according to koppen” a tropical climate.
You must remember that Hawaii southernmost point is located in 18.9111°N, that’s about 2200 km from the equator “almost as long as the continental territory of the US”, so you can’t expect to have the same climate and vegetation to regións of the world closer to the equator.
That is why Mauna Kea can get snow in Winter, there is a seasonal change “altought not as stark as those found at higher latitudes.
A perfectly good example of this are the alpine regions within the tropics. The ones closer to the equator “the paramos of the norhtern tropical andes and the southern portion of central america in Costa Rica, Panama, Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador and northern peru; the highlands of Eastern africa and the mountains in new guinea share similar characteristics and are a completely different biome than those found at higher latitudes within the tropics “the zacatonales of Mexico and Guatemala, the puna of the dry central andes in peru, Bolivia, northern argenina and northern chile, the highlands of Hawaii”


3. “It has a tropical climate”

I Agree, but not equatorial


4. “If the forests of far southern China are tropical in nature, than the forests in the southern Florida and Hawaii are tropical rainforests.”

I didnt mention China, but considering that Hainan island southernmost point is at 18°09′33″N then it has a tropical “not equatorial” climate according to Koppen and subtropical vegetation according to Holdridge.

5. “I get nitpicking Florida - but calling Hawaiian forests "subtropical" when they're listed as tropical rainforest by the WWF? That's stupid. There is nothing else to call them but subtropical. They aren't climatically, geographically, or ecologically "subtropical" at all.”

First, if we use the classification of the WWF there is no “tropical rainforest”, what they have is “Tropical and subtropical moist broadleaf forests” and in that term they put together a lot of different types of biomes.

Secondly WWF classification is very generic, if you want to get more “technical” and use a model that actually uses the term “tropical rainforest”, instead of being stupid “your own words”, then I recommend Holdridge.

The WWF’S Tropical and subtropical moist broadleaf forests is in fact 15 different biomes “tropical moist forest, tropical wet forest, tropical rain forest, tropical premontane moist forest, tropical premontane wet forest, tropical premontane rain forest, tropical lower montane moist forest, tropical lower montane wet forest, tropical lower montane rain forest, subtropical moist forest, subtropical wet forest, subtropical rain forest, subtropical lower montane moist forest, subtropical lower montane wet forest, subtropical lower montane rain forest”

6. “Tropical vegetation is not confined to the equatorial region at all, so that doesn't make sense. “

it could be a valid point if there is a system that changes the terminology, as long as it makes the distinction between the biomes closet to the equator and those “tropical” biomes that are not closet o the equator

7. “EDIT: Looking at the Holdridge Life Zones, it appears that nowhere in China is labeled as having "tropical forest" either, despite the presence of legitimate tropical forests in southern Yunnan and on Hainan island. This seems to be a quirk of this classification.”

Again where did I mention China?


8. “Alaska has a polar climate in it's north. You have, essentially, subarctic/arctic desert in areas of middle Alaska. The phrase "ice desert" doesn't really make sense”

the term ice desert do exist in the Holdridge’s model, its equivalent to koppen ice cap climate, be it a true EF climate “ice cap formed at sea level” or EFH climate “Highland ice cap”, Alaska has the more modarate ET climate “tundra” and only “at higher elevation does it have a EFH climate” just like the alps, andes, himalayas, and other mountans high enough to allow the formation of glaciers


https://data.fs.usda.gov/research/pu...iitf_gtr48.pdf
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Old 02-22-2021, 04:48 AM
 
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of the very large countries , i would say it is the most diverse

on a per square mile basis , No
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Old 02-23-2021, 10:04 AM
 
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People are right to say its between China and the US, "However a case can be made for Argentina competing for the first place, the country's only weak point is that it lacks anything resembling a tropical coastal landscape, but its stronger on the mountain area as the andes run the country from north to south so high mountains are all over the territory and not localized on certain areas like the US and China"
For me, if its between the US and China, the US has a slight edge thanks to Alaska
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Old 03-01-2021, 01:26 AM
 
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The vast majority of Chinese provinces have mountains over 2000m high.
Attached Thumbnails
Is the USA the most geographically diverse country in the world?-4ccacd1f-9bee-44ce-8130-c694cc7c2b66.jpeg  
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Old Yesterday, 03:02 PM
 
47 posts, read 19,488 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettafish View Post
The vast majority of Chinese provinces have mountains over 2000m high.
Very good and usefull map, and while its true that China does have a lot of high mountains "including the highest in the world" Argentina its still stronger on that area regarding diversity of landscapes. Remember what I posted of "what I consider" makes a country diverse "lenght of the country, coastal diversity, range of precipitation, topographic diversity"

Argentina is a long country that goes from the tropics to boreal "and probably subpolar in the southernmost parts of tierra del fuego" and it has the rare combination "probably the only in the world along with chile" of having all altitudinal zones in almost every latitudinal area "except the polar latitude"

In the case of mountains, china southermost glacier located in the jade dragon in the 29 N Latitude, that means it has no tropical glaciers or even alpine or subalpine tropical areas, nor does it have glaciers north of the 49 N Latitude
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