U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Happy Easter!
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-23-2014, 10:16 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,783 posts, read 15,333,888 times
Reputation: 2833

Advertisements

Interesting, I thought this western tradition was the norm in most countries. It still is here in Australia, although exceptions probably are increasing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-24-2014, 08:14 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
34,549 posts, read 42,724,437 times
Reputation: 57209
I believe in some Scandinavian countries, daughters keep the mother's last name, and sons keep the father's last name. I like this idea.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-24-2014, 08:22 AM
 
579 posts, read 516,330 times
Reputation: 334
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Interesting, I thought this western tradition was the norm in most countries. It still is here in Australia, although exceptions probably are increasing.
It's not a western tradition but germanic and anglo. In latin countries have never been the norm.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-24-2014, 08:29 AM
 
Location: Finland
24,268 posts, read 17,510,732 times
Reputation: 11103
Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
I believe in some Scandinavian countries, daughters keep the mother's last name, and sons keep the father's last name. I like this idea.
Hmm, I don't think so. I think you're mixing up with the Icelandic naming customs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-24-2014, 08:45 AM
 
Location: Minsk, Belarus
654 posts, read 680,266 times
Reputation: 549
In Belarus, most women take their husband's last name after marriage.
However, some choose not to do it.
By law, it's also possible for a husband to take his wife's surname. But I think hardly anyone does that in real life. If someone does, people will probably laugh at him
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-24-2014, 08:47 AM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
16,138 posts, read 21,387,246 times
Reputation: 8318
Quote:
Originally Posted by victus View Post
Probably the countries that have been Spanish colonies.
Mexican women end up with hyphenated names. Gloria Garcia marrying Jose Gonzalez usually ends up Gloria Gonzalez-Garcia
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-24-2014, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,668 posts, read 71,556,197 times
Reputation: 35864
I have been told by a lawyer in Michigan that in that state, it is actually illegal for a woman to not take the name of her husband, unless specifically designated in the formal marriage documents, which would otherwise constitute a tacit name change. If a woman marries, without legally taking the necessary steps to change her name back to original, she can be held to have falsified her identity. Never happens in fact, but it's the law. I did not proceed in the discussion to what happens if a woman marries in another state, is commonly and legally known under her maiden name, and then moves to Michigan and continues to go by that alias.

In Missouri, in a divorce (that I happened to be involved in), an ex-wife's desire to restore her former name has to be spelled out as a legal name change before the judge in the divorce proceeding. Which makes me think the Michigan law might be mirrored in Missouri, too.

Canada's custom, as described in an earlier post (#4), is rather new. Into the 1980's I did not know of any Canadian women who retained their maiden name (even in Quebec), except for a few who had established professional careers under their former name.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-24-2014, 09:43 AM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
16,138 posts, read 21,387,246 times
Reputation: 8318
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marmel View Post
In Belarus, most women take their husband's last name after marriage.
However, some choose not to do it.
By law, it's also possible for a husband to take his wife's surname. But I think hardly anyone does that in real life. If someone does, people will probably laugh at him
Sounds a lot like the US. The vast majority of women take their husbands name. Some do not however. Legally a man can take his wifes name but it's never done. Then like I said, many Mexicans (Mexican in this case being a cultural reference) hyphenate and use both names often with the husbands name first.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-24-2014, 09:45 AM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
16,138 posts, read 21,387,246 times
Reputation: 8318
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
I have been told by a lawyer in Michigan that in that state, it is actually illegal for a woman to not take the name of her husband, unless specifically designated in the formal marriage documents, which would otherwise constitute a tacit name change. If a woman marries, without legally taking the necessary steps to change her name back to original, she can be held to have falsified her identity. Never happens in fact, but it's the law. I did not proceed in the discussion to what happens if a woman marries in another state, is commonly and legally known under her maiden name, and then moves to Michigan and continues to go by that alias.

In Missouri, in a divorce (that I happened to be involved in), an ex-wife's desire to restore her former name has to be spelled out as a legal name change before the judge in the divorce proceeding. Which makes me think the Michigan law might be mirrored in Missouri, too.

Canada's custom, as described in an earlier post (#4), is rather new. Into the 1980's I did not know of any Canadian women who retained their maiden name (even in Quebec), except for a few who had established professional careers under their former name.
Always forget about state laws. Interesting, thanks.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-24-2014, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Czech Republic
2,385 posts, read 5,568,853 times
Reputation: 788
In the Philippines, before the arrival of the Americans, women used to carry their name and put the husband's name in the middle then followed by letter " y " and then her last name, ex. Maiden name Consuelo Martinez becomes Consuelo Ramos y Martinez when she gets married. Now Philippines dropped that system and followed the Anglo way because of the Americans, but letter " y " in the middle is still being used but only in important documents.

Last edited by Hermosaa; 03-24-2014 at 10:04 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top