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Old 03-25-2014, 02:46 AM
 
Location: Paris
8,078 posts, read 6,225,560 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BugsyPal View Post
Technically in France where by statue dating back to the French Revolution citizens are not allowed to use any other name than what is registered at birth.

Married and maiden names - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Though it's customary to change names, or at least change to an hyphenated name. According to a 1995 Eurobarometer survey, 91% of the women took their husband's name, 7% had an hyphenated name and 2% kept their birth name.
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Old 03-25-2014, 06:03 AM
 
30,314 posts, read 31,181,855 times
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In Ecuador all babies are given 2 last names which is a combination of their father's and mother's family names. When a woman gets married she drops her mother's family name, but keeps her father's family name and adds her husband's family name (instead of her mother's surname).
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Old 03-25-2014, 06:44 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by victus View Post
It's not a western tradition but germanic and anglo. In latin countries have never been the norm.
Interesting, even say Italy? Italy seems so patriarchal and family dominated yet also with strong matriarchal figures.
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Old 03-25-2014, 06:48 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marmel View Post
In Belarus, most women take their husband's last name after marriage.
However, some choose not to do it.
By law, it's also possible for a husband to take his wife's surname. But I think hardly anyone does that in real life. If someone does, people will probably laugh at him
I notice in Russia women add an 'a' to their surname. For example tennis player Marat Safin and his sister Dinara Safina.
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Old 03-25-2014, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Minsk, Belarus
654 posts, read 679,941 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
I notice in Russia women add an 'a' to their surname. For example tennis player Marat Safin and his sister Dinara Safina.
That's true! Names ending with -ov and -in really add an 'a'. But it doesn't depend on marital status.
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Old 03-25-2014, 10:55 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,668 posts, read 71,523,609 times
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Spanish naming customs vary by country, and change over time, so would be way to complex to describe here. But there is a general pattern which is recognized in most Spanish speaking countries. I'll bold the patrilineal (father's) name for convenience.

Maria Alvarez Sanchez married Jose Castro Martinez.
She becomes Maria Castro de Alvarez, commonly referred to as Senora Castro,
Their daughter is Isabella Castro Alvarez.
She married Juan Hernandez Lopez, and becomes Isabella Hernandez de Castro, or Sra. Hernandez.
Their children will be Carla and Ruben Hernandez Castro.

In other words, where there appear to be two surnames, the first one is the paternal line, and is kept and passed through marriage, and the second one is the maternal line, and disappears after a generation.

Hispanics in America generally use only the father's name, and in formal documents, often place their maternal in parentheses before or after the paternal, regardless of the custom in their original country. For example, ballplayer Roberto (Walker) Clemente (Arriba), whose mother's surname was Walker de Arriba. Although I have a Mexican friend who uses his mother's name instead, just because he likes it better, and it looks like his last name on his documents, and Americans don't know the difference.

==========

In Arabic countries, surnames are much less important than in the rest of the world. A list of names would be alphabetized by first name, not last name. Men are commonly know by acquantances not by their own name, but as the father of their first born son. Abdullah Kemal would be widely known as Abu Ahmed (father of Ahmed), since he names his first son Ahmed, and might even begin using that name before getting married, with the expectation of naming his first son Ahmed. Some of his friends won't even know that his real name is Abdullah Kemal. His wife, immediately upon marriage, would become known familiarly as Umm Ahmed (mother of Ahmed), even though Ahmed has not even been conceived yet, and many neighbors would never know her real name.

Last edited by jtur88; 03-25-2014 at 11:30 AM..
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Old 03-25-2014, 11:08 AM
 
Location: Finland
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Taking the husband's name or a combined name is still the overwhelmingly most popular way here in Finland. Over 75% do this, and only 2% of husbands take the bride's name. Some 20% of couples keep their own names, and some couples "invent" a new surname altogether, starting a new family from scratch.
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Old 03-25-2014, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
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61% still change their names, but that figure is falling. Some people will combine their surname with their partner's, so Anna Smith, who marries Jack Coleman, would become Anna Smith-Coleman. That's pretty common in other countries, I gather, at least predominantly English-speaking ones?
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Old 03-25-2014, 11:56 AM
 
Location: Finland
24,268 posts, read 17,503,817 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
61% still change their names, but that figure is falling. Some people will combine their surname with their partner's, so Anna Smith, who marries Jack Coleman, would become Anna Smith-Coleman. That's pretty common in other countries, I gather, at least predominantly English-speaking ones?
Yes, very common here.
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Old 03-25-2014, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
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I thought so.

Also, the first same-sex wedding takes place this weekend. I wonder if same-sex couples will continue this tradition, or shun it?
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