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Old 04-03-2014, 01:04 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Every day?
No that's disgusting
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Old 04-03-2014, 01:14 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
My impression is that 99% of people around the world don't really distinguish between the US and Canada, Canada is just considered a kind of appendix, but basically the same thing. I bet not even one percent of people living outside North America could even name the Canadian president, prime minister or whatever they have there. I wonder what the percentage for US Americans is, many of them probably don't know, either
Probably about 10 to 20 percent of Americans know its Stephen Harper.
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Old 04-03-2014, 02:22 PM
 
Location: Viña del Mar, Chile
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
Probably about 10 to 20 percent of Americans know its Stephen Harper.
I was under the impression that it was Steve Yzerman
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Old 04-03-2014, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
9,620 posts, read 12,807,136 times
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Here in China, "American" exclusively means a United States citizen; the Chinese word "Meiguo," phonetically derived from "America," means United States of American. If you were a Brazilian or Uruguayan who decided to tell a Chinese person that you were "American," they would be confused... if you then tried to say that Brazil or Uruguay was in America, they'd look at you, puzzled, trying to imagine the country fitting into the continental United States.

As far as my travels have been concerned, practically speaking, no one equates "American" with "The Americas."

"I'm an American!" said a plucky, freckle-faced, can-do young man with enthusiasm in his face.
"Oh really? What part of America? The United States, Canada, Mexico, Argentina, Chile, Panama, Brazil, Uruguay, Bolivia, Belize, Honduras, or...?" said no one who wasn't trying to be a jerk with a smarmy smirk on their face, ever.

There's America (the United States), and then Canada (Canada), Brazil (Brazil), Mexico (Mexico), etc. If a European referred to someone as an American, it'd mean they were from the US. Once in a billion years, you'll meet some guy from _____ who's had a few too many and an axe to grind who starts reminding you that the US isn't the only country in the Americas, and then there's a cacophony of English and Aussie guys who are like, "OH COME OFF IT MATE, you had too much to drink..."

Back a few steps then...

You want to nitpick about how there are Indian, Chinese, Dutch, Korean, Brazilian nationals employed by American tech companies? Fine. The companies are still based in the US and encourage foreign nationals to move to the US to live in the US and work on US campuses and develop new technologies for them to patent in the US which means that these are advances made in the US. The output of campuses in Bangalore is still well behind. The booming Chinese tech market runs on US-originated software platforms (Windows, Android, etc) and there's basically no effort to start an indigenous equivalence.

I certainly agree that the US is falling in terms of its global prominence, but to discount it entirely is utterly absurd.

And now then: to the OT...

When I was in the UK, there was a specific comraderie between myself and the locals that got me invited to sing pub songs about two world wars and a world cup (IIRC; I don't watch sports), and more than a few fairly deep cultural conversations. The only time I was made to feel like a jerk, a British guy stepped in to shout the guy down and back him off before I had the chance.

Here in China, the only overtly negative sentiments against the US I got was from a Nepalese (?) guy looking to start a fight with a white person (he'd gone after a Brit, an Aussie, a German, a Russian, and a Canadian before he got to me), and a Sudanese guy on St Patty's who was similarly looking for a fight. It ended in his friends making him apologize and us doing shots together.

I'm proud enough of my American roots, but I'm also critical of plenty aspects of American society and politics, which shocks people. It's not so much that they expect that I brandish my nationality to others, so much as it is that they don't understand why it is that I wouldn't express patriotism towards my country. Pretty much everyone else does this about their own country, and if you're going around a circle saying

"My country has a 5,000 year old history."
"My country had empires spanning three continents and some amazing food to boot."
"My country had empires spanning six continents and our food was okay, but we gave the world the Beatles."
etc etc etc
to answer with,
"my country is really messed up, we live in a police state and we bombed the hell out of a bunch of innocent countries and we have republicans and Mitt Romney got on the ballots and sometimes I just wish I was born in Sweden or something" is fairly inappropriate and really just makes you look like a crybaby.
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Old 04-03-2014, 03:23 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
20,605 posts, read 25,694,204 times
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Just wanted to say that most Canadians don't lay any claim to the moniker "America", and don't care and aren't offended that it is used to identify people from the United States. (That's what we call them as well.)

Sure we know that technically we are Americans too because we live on the landmass that extends from the Arctic to the Tierra del Fuego, but really... we don't care.
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Old 04-03-2014, 03:23 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
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The Chinese use the 7-continent model of the world, so naturally the Chinese do not have a second meaning for America in the singular. But China is not the world...
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Old 04-03-2014, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Viña del Mar, Chile
16,416 posts, read 25,241,837 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
The Chinese use the 7-continent model of the world, so naturally the Chinese do not have a second meaning for America in the singular. But China is not the world...
Pretty sure he wasn't only talking about China.
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Old 04-03-2014, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
20,605 posts, read 25,694,204 times
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Regarding overtly displaying your nationality abroad (in whatever way)... my question is why would you want to do that anyway?

I am not ashamed to be Canadian at all but when travelling abroad I avoid any symbols at all that would give away where I am from.

The better you fit in with the crowd (not always possible due to physical characteristics it is true), the less likely you are to get robbed or ripped off.
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Old 04-03-2014, 03:40 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
19,865 posts, read 18,340,994 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Regarding overtly displaying your nationality abroad (in whatever way)... my question is why would you want to do that anyway?

I am not ashamed to be Canadian at all but when travelling abroad I avoid any symbols at all that would give away where I am from.

The better you fit in with the crowd (not always possible due to physical characteristics it is true), the less likely you are to get robbed or ripped off.
Canadians would have no problem wearing maple t-shirts etc. because with Canada there is no negative connotation as it is perceived as a neutral country, wrongly or not. People know very little about it, it is not known for anything except ice hockey abroad. So people might actually be curious
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Old 04-03-2014, 03:41 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,805 posts, read 17,013,814 times
Reputation: 8981
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Regarding overtly displaying your nationality abroad (in whatever way)... my question is why would you want to do that anyway?

I am not ashamed to be Canadian at all but when travelling abroad I avoid any symbols at all that would give away where I am from.

The better you fit in with the crowd (not always possible due to physical characteristics it is true), the less likely you are to get robbed or ripped off.
Because i don't want to be mistaken for a Canadian.
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