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Old 05-24-2014, 06:50 AM
 
Location: Sweden
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Yes, it is.
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Old 05-24-2014, 08:14 AM
 
Location: Finland
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As a serious answer, no, I don't think it's idealised.

There's a lot of summer cottages in Finland, so most people enjoy a rural refuge, but very few wants to actually move permanently to the middle of nowhere. Farming and animal husbandry is a really tough and definitely not a lucrative profession.

Suburban life is in some cirlces appreciated and maybe even idealised, but it's more of the suburban style that is similar to Germany. Big yards and houses, peaceful environment and nature nearby and so on, but still close to services and large cities.
But it doesn't involve horses, dirt bikes, pickup trucks or muscular build-up.
Actually, during recent days it has been a lot of discussion about that people may lose their life savings as they own big houses in the middle of nowhere, and nobody is interested in buying them.

Quite on the contrary, city life especially among the younger generations is on the rise. 20 years ago it was almost certain that when you have kids, you buy or build a house in the far suburbs, but now in the last 10 years many families want affordable flats near the city centre, in a green (both ecologically and florally), safe and bike-friendly environment. Shops and culture within walking distance. Mega-shopping centres on a field not accessable by public transport are already banned by a decree, and no new shopping-hells are allowed to be built. All respectable cities have also begun to take serious measures to prevent suburban sprawl.
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Old 05-24-2014, 11:14 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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I think it is common in Britain, Germany, and especially Scandinavia. To the point where fully urban people desire a sanitized version of country living on a regular basis in the form of having a vacation cabin, camping trips, hiking/trekking, etc. The U.S. and Canada, by extension, are much the same.
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Old 05-25-2014, 05:18 PM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
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The responses over the past two months or so have been interesting. Thank you.

I have to say that "country living" is not idealized by all Americans. Many urbanites and suburbanites see "country culture" as weird, boring, or worse. It's also something that is primarily idealized by white people and (in a different form) by American Indians.

I don't think camping (in a tent), hiking, or trekking (on foot) is particularly valued in the country mindset. Those are more of yuppie activities partaken in by residents of the affluent, cosmopolitan "concrete jungles" of large cities and suburbs. Nor does the environmental movement factor much into the country lifestyle: environmentalists have opposed ATVs, dirt bikes, snowmobiles, big pick-up trucks, etc. and are often urban rather than rurally-based. Organic food (not mentioned by you) is not esteemed in the stereotypical country lifestyle, but farm-fresh food and garden vegetables are. Many country people own roosters, hens, etc.

A stereotypical rural resident immersed in country culture around here:

1) Pulls out their male children above 12 (earliest age to get a gun safety permit) from school for a few days in deer hunting season and the fishing opener in May.

2) Thinks nothing of shopping at Walmart and eating at Applebee's, and considers the Red Lobster or the Olive Garden to be their idea of "nice restaurants".

3) Owns at least five vehicles, at least three of which are parked outside and have mechanical problems. Various automotive, electronic, and mechanical detritus can be found in and perhaps along their secondary structures, and even (in many cases) in their yards. Storage is no problem in the American countryside; their seems to be an infinity of places to stuff unused or broken things when you're on 10 or 20 acres, as opposed to living in an apartment or small city lot. In the suburbs, the HOA or code enforcement would have a apoplectic fit over some rural people's yards.

4) Drinks cheap beer and whiskey, even as an older adult, and frequents the local bar at least twice a month. Wine comes in a box and refined tastes in alcohol are considered very pretentious.

5) Owns, and is most likely proud of, a riding lawnmower (lawn tractor). Takes profound pleasure in riding around and mowing their extensive lawn (from what I've seen, it's usually the head of the household that does this).

6) Has a loud exhaust pipe on their pick-up truck if male.

7) As in urban environments, the majority of population does not do drugs, but if you're a country boy or girl, you're likely to choose methamphetamines or heroin as your poison.

8) Has a generally "laissez-faire" or libertarian attitude towards land, their possessions, their guns, and their money. May have a confederate flag and often re-posts or shares images with this theme on Facebook.

9) Owned a GPS unit before smartphones came with them. Also likely owns a depth/fish finder for their boat. May have a louder stereo system in their garage than in their home.

10) Regularly has or attends bonfires, in some of which household garbage, old mattresses, etc. are burned. Has a "burning pit" on their land.

11) Doesn't walk anywhere. Gets in their car to check the mail or cash a check at the bank across the street.

12) Went to "pit parties" as a teenager during the summer.

All this I have seen several times and none of it would appear abnormal to most working-class rural Minnesotans. Some of these even apply to me (and some of them I'm a bit snobby on, like not walking anywhere).

Last edited by tvdxer; 05-25-2014 at 05:32 PM..
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Old 05-25-2014, 06:30 PM
 
Location: Finland
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Ok, I'll try my best to create a stereotype with those guidelines.


1) Might be interested in hunting, but as a gun permit is immensely difficult to get (despite Finland having the 5th most guns per capita in the world), most don't bother. Fishing is of course very popular, no wonder in the country of thousand lakes.

2) Most likely, especially before e-commerce. Nowadays especially rural girls buy expensive clothes online. The level of the restaurants is really poor in rural Finland. Mostly burger joints, bebab-pizzerias and Rosso (the Finnish equvalent of the Olive Garden). Yes, this point is true.

3) Nope. Gas is extremely expensive compared to the US, so 2 cars. The kids might have a moped or share a 15 year old car. Lawnmowers are pushable gas-driven (like 130cc). Maybe a boat with a small engine, but no other gas-driven vehicles

4) Drinks domestic beer and vodka-mixers. Wine comes in a bottle. Frequents the local bar or the nearest city. Only the most hard-core middle-aged men drink vodka straight anymore.

5) Lawnmowing is hell.

6) Yes, the most rednecky young men have usually old BMW's with a lot of low-class tuning apparatuses. Then they go tire-burning and speeding in the nearest town on a Friday night. This is considered the epitome of pathetic rural miserability in the cities. Already driving a car like this is a reason for the cops to pull you over if you're heading to a city.

7) Not really. Drug abuse is still very much a urban and suburban thing. Mostly comes in medicine form if used, like dextroamphetamine, alprazolam or benzodiazepine. Growing pot is on the rise.

8) Has often a nationalistic-decentralized-conservative, but economically leftish attitude. Dislike city life, immigrants, liberalism and everything else they don't understand. Libertarianism is non-existent in Finland.
90% of the hard-core Christians live in selected rural muncipalities.

9) Might have a louder stereo system in their car than their home. Most likely don't use a GPS device or fish-finder, as that is pretending. City people use artificial helping devices seems to be the attitude.

10) We don't have those.

11) Maybe. Especially young people drive their new-bought cars everywhere, but older people don't mind walking. It's a proper rural activity after all.

12) Sometimes like the sort, yes. Also home parties and BBQ's.
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Old 05-26-2014, 03:04 PM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
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I knew some folks that lived on a few acres in Inyokern, CA.

When they'd get out of their car at home, they'd throw their fast food trash out of their car into their yard.

When they came to stay with me in urban Colorado, they did the same thing in my suburban yard.
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Old 05-27-2014, 08:47 AM
 
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No, there is urbanization going on over here because of rising fuel prices, availability of facilities like doctors and shopping being more available in larger towns. On the other hand, it is difficult to find any place on the mainland Netherlands where you are further than a 30 minutes drive away from a large town.
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Old 05-31-2014, 09:45 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Western Massachusetts
45,749 posts, read 39,655,111 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tvdxer View Post
The responses over the past two months or so have been interesting. Thank you.

I have to say that "country living" is not idealized by all Americans. Many urbanites and suburbanites see "country culture" as weird, boring, or worse. It's also something that is primarily idealized by white people and (in a different form) by American Indians.

I don't think camping (in a tent), hiking, or trekking (on foot) is particularly valued in the country mindset. Those are more of yuppie activities partaken in by residents of the affluent, cosmopolitan "concrete jungles" of large cities and suburbs. Nor does the environmental movement factor much into the country lifestyle: environmentalists have opposed ATVs, dirt bikes, snowmobiles, big pick-up trucks, etc. and are often urban rather than rurally-based. Organic food (not mentioned by you) is not esteemed in the stereotypical country lifestyle, but farm-fresh food and garden vegetables are. Many country people own roosters, hens, etc.
I've noticed somewhat differently. The residents of big cities and their suburbs here are often not that interested in the outdoors, those in the countryside sometimes have more interest. I grew up on Long Island (NYC suburbs), few people were interested in hiking or camping, many had never been. My tastes were a bit unusual. Seems like Boston residents are more interested; I hiked up Mt. Washington with someone from the Boston suburbs and we met a couple people from his high school on the trail.

A lot in the rural Northeast a familiar with the local trails. Vermont locals seemed familiar with the trails and locals were familiar with relatively obscure and undeveloped tents campsites, while many of the city tourists stopped at cute towns and outlet malls and didn't look like the type that would "rough it". Overheard a few local high schoolers, their weekend plans involved drinking lots of beer and camping. Other rural areas, it's more of a mix. Backpacking often appeals to a different demographic than the hunting/fishing set. Seemed like in Keene, NY in the Adirondacks, people like hiking and camping. In the rural West, some did outdoor stuff, others just saw it as work. Horseback riding was favored among the latter group. In interior rural northern California, it seemed like the only road bicyclists were transplants from urban areas (not true in the rural Northeast). Rural New England culture has less stereotypical "country culture" than the rest of the US, but upstate NY definitely has it. Here are some things different about the rural Northeast.

1) Some are into hunting, maybe more into fishing. For Vermont at least there's no age for a gun permit. The state has almost no gun regulations.

2) Not so many chain restaurants in rural areas, diners and local independent restaurants are common. Usually not fancy at all, and give a small town feel of "everyone knows everyone".

3) Poorer parts of upstate NY look trashier with abandoned cars. Less common in New England, but I found this in rural Massachusetts:



5) Rural residents don't always have big lawns here. Those who don't farm just have houses in the woods, sometimes with the forest nearly to the house. Real rural New England is being in the middle of the forest, right? [and maybe living in a 150+ year old home] Some of upstate NY is homes in the forest, others in the flatter, more agricultural areas adopt the big lawn look.

6) Has a loud exhaust pipe on their pick-up truck if male.

7) While perhaps it doesn't count as a poison, in the rural, suburban and urban Northeast marijuana is by far the most common illegal drug and has lost its stigma.

8) Confederate flags look weird here, even in say, rural upstate NY. Not done. Even if liberal, rural residents do complain about regulation from the more urban-oriented state capital. Such as restrictions on brush burning.

11) Mix, some do walk, some don't. But obviously most must drive to get anywhere.
[/quote]
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Old 05-31-2014, 09:57 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo
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More and more people are fleeing the city and suburbs to build or buy cabins/houses in the wilderness. A Mountain Lion peeking thru the bushes thinking " There goes the neighborhood "
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