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Old 04-06-2014, 10:08 AM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
^ compared to Australians, it seems being 'American' isn't as much tied to being white (or black) as here in Australia. I guess America seems more culturally inclusive, while even many people who are of say Italian background will refer to Anglo-Celtic Australians as 'Aussies' and themselves as 'Italians' (even though they still identify as Australian). I don't think of say, a Korean American as less American than an African or British American if they were born in America, speak the accent and are culturally 'American.'
Hmmm, seems similar postman. A person of Italian decent is "American" both according to them and the nation as a whole. However when asked "what they are" they will proudly say that they're Italian. People of Irish decent are the same way. It gets dicey when dealing with Mexicans because it can often be impossible to tell who were born here and who were immigrants.
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Old 04-06-2014, 10:43 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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The main reason Italian-Americans and Irish-Americans (etc.) say, "I'm Italian." or "I'm Irish" omitting the '-American' is because the hyhenated addendum is implied by the fact that they are obviously American.

This excludes a minority of deluded folks who claim they are culturally identical to their relatives in their origin countries.

In some cities where these ethnicities lived together in stable communities and retained a lot of cultural practices and attitudes, being a "-American" actually means something in terms of ethnic subculture. An Italian-American in much of the Northeast may not be a European Italian, but they are not necessarily a mainstream Anglo/Germanic American either.

Meanwhile, an American of Italian heritage living in Arizona named Scott who thinks ketchup is marinara sauce is another thing entirely.
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Old 04-06-2014, 04:14 PM
 
Location: East coast
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I feel like hyphenated identities are not really phrases people say in real life very much anyways to describe themselves in first person. It's not very often you'll hear someone personally saying stuff like "I'm Italian-American/African-American/Asian-American etc." but you will read about it discussed or written down in phrases like talking about the "African-American culture" or the "Italian-American immigrant experience."

Sometimes these phrases are put on people anyways who wouldn't say it themselves, like African-American isn't necessarily preferred over black by everyone who self-identifies as such.

Hyphenated phrases are so long and unwieldy sometimes, aren't they?

Plus, the hyphenated "-American" is redundant as mentioned, if you are already in the USA and obviously American, there's no need. And plus, if you are say, doing some travel overseas, most Americans of any race or ethnicity would just call themselves "Americans", I'd think.
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Old 04-06-2014, 04:40 PM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markovian process View Post
I feel like hyphenated identities are not really phrases people say in real life very much anyways to describe themselves in first person. It's not very often you'll hear someone personally saying stuff like "I'm Italian-American/African-American/Asian-American etc." but you will read about it discussed or written down in phrases like talking about the "African-American culture" or the "Italian-American immigrant experience."

Sometimes these phrases are put on people anyways who wouldn't say it themselves, like African-American isn't necessarily preferred over black by everyone who self-identifies as such.

Hyphenated phrases are so long and unwieldy sometimes, aren't they?

Plus, the hyphenated "-American" is redundant as mentioned, if you are already in the USA and obviously American, there's no need. And plus, if you are say, doing some travel overseas, most Americans of any race or ethnicity would just call themselves "Americans", I'd think.
You are pretty much correct although there are Blacks in the USA who will sometimes call themselves African-American. A few Asians may do this as well. That is, say they're Asian-American. Generally speaking though, the average person does not use these phrases and like you said, often find these cumbersome terms sort of thrust upon them. It's the overly politically correct types who insist on such terminology.
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Old 04-06-2014, 06:51 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
Hmmm, seems similar postman. A person of Italian decent is "American" both according to them and the nation as a whole. However when asked "what they are" they will proudly say that they're Italian. People of Irish decent are the same way. It gets dicey when dealing with Mexicans because it can often be impossible to tell who were born here and who were immigrants.
But an Italian American would never refer to say British Americans as just 'Americans' would they?
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Old 04-06-2014, 06:52 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,783 posts, read 15,350,368 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markovian process View Post
I feel like hyphenated identities are not really phrases people say in real life very much anyways to describe themselves in first person. It's not very often you'll hear someone personally saying stuff like "I'm Italian-American/African-American/Asian-American etc." but you will read about it discussed or written down in phrases like talking about the "African-American culture" or the "Italian-American immigrant experience."

Sometimes these phrases are put on people anyways who wouldn't say it themselves, like African-American isn't necessarily preferred over black by everyone who self-identifies as such.

Hyphenated phrases are so long and unwieldy sometimes, aren't they?

Plus, the hyphenated "-American" is redundant as mentioned, if you are already in the USA and obviously American, there's no need. And plus, if you are say, doing some travel overseas, most Americans of any race or ethnicity would just call themselves "Americans", I'd think.
Yeah if asked where I'm from I just say I'm Australian. If they ask more I tell them.
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Old 04-06-2014, 07:23 PM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
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Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
But an Italian American would never refer to say British Americans as just 'Americans' would they?
In the US, there really is no such title as "British American". People will say there of English, Scottish or Welsh decent but the term British American is pretty much nonexistent. An Italian American would refer to any other American as just American and when not being specific about themselves, just American for them too.
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Old 04-08-2014, 07:04 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac15 View Post
I personally would laugh if they called themselves American.

It would just look so silly being so far away.
Hawai'ians are also far away. Does that mean they can't call themselves American?
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Old 04-08-2014, 07:10 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
In the US, there really is no such title as "British American". People will say there of English, Scottish or Welsh decent but the term British American is pretty much nonexistent. An Italian American would refer to any other American as just American and when not being specific about themselves, just American for them too.
Yes but here there are some of say Southern European, Middle Eastern or Asia descent who use 'Australian' to specify refer to those that are not them. So 'wogs and Aussies.'

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQr...M_1xILTm4HAk-A

Check out the 'differences between wogs and aussies' videos.

I doubt those Jersey shore guidos are making videos on the 'differences between wops and americans.'

Note most of these 'wogs' still consider themselves Australian, I guess the short-hand 'Aussies' (but also 'Australians') is often used specifically for 'skips', Anglo Australians.
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Old 04-08-2014, 08:47 AM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
16,144 posts, read 21,401,324 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Yes but here there are some of say Southern European, Middle Eastern or Asia descent who use 'Australian' to specify refer to those that are not them. So 'wogs and Aussies.'

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQr...M_1xILTm4HAk-A

Check out the 'differences between wogs and aussies' videos.

I doubt those Jersey shore guidos are making videos on the 'differences between wops and americans.'

Note most of these 'wogs' still consider themselves Australian, I guess the short-hand 'Aussies' (but also 'Australians') is often used specifically for 'skips', Anglo Australians.
Not really sure where you're going here postman. I will tell you though that you are right about there not being a wop vs. American video series. Wop is considered derogatory, a racial slur in the US and Italians wouldn't refer to themselves as such in the same way they seemed to have embraced "wog" down under.
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