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Old 04-25-2014, 10:21 PM
 
Location: Brisbane
3,359 posts, read 5,211,132 times
Reputation: 2694

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Quote:
Originally Posted by cushla View Post
Migrants have have a lot of money to come to Australia, many are arriving on 4 years visas, there are not the opportunities as there once was plus many foreign companies bring in there own workers. Cheap labor.
True, however I was referring to full PR visas not temp ones.

Last edited by danielsa1775; 04-25-2014 at 11:09 PM..
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Old 04-25-2014, 10:33 PM
 
Location: Next stop Antarctica
1,797 posts, read 2,345,805 times
Reputation: 2056
As a migrant my first choice was Canada but it was harder to be accepted there than Australia and that was 40 years ago.
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Old 04-26-2014, 02:00 AM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
1,856 posts, read 1,591,318 times
Reputation: 2141
Quote:
Originally Posted by CravingMountains View Post
Isn't it easy for the British to move to Australia? Something about being part of the commonwealth? British people have to follow the same rules as everyone else to move to America. It isn't easy. You gotta have a lot of pieces of paper saying you are smart or you have to have a lot of money. Otherwise, the line starts WAAAAAYYY back there!
Let's put this myth to rest.

Do I, as a Commonwealth citizen, have an easier time moving to Australia (a Commonwealth state) than an American does? No. Australia is an independent country, as Canada is, and as such, it makes its own rules for immigration. To Australians, I am a foreigner just as much as an American is.

Commonwealth citizens generally have no more rights moving to another Commonwealth nation than an American (i.e. not a member of the Commonwealth) does. Commonwealth citizens trying to immigrate to another Commonwealth country have to jump through the same hoops, answer the same questions, fill out the same forms, etc., as a non-Commonwealth citizen.

Americans who perpetuate the "well, all Commonwealth citizens are ultimately British and can move around freely within the Empire" myth would do well to educate themselves on modern geopolitics. To start with, the British Empire is long dead.
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Old 04-26-2014, 02:14 AM
 
Location: North West Northern Ireland.
20,695 posts, read 18,702,470 times
Reputation: 3107
Quote:
Originally Posted by cushla View Post
Migrants have to have a lot of money to come to Australia, many are arriving on 4 years visas, there are not the opportunities as there once was plus many foreign companies bring in there own workers. Cheap labor.
People would crazy to come all the way to Australia for a bit of sunshine which incidentally doesn't shine every day.
I don't think British people would settle for cheap labour!

Theres a smart chance of that one!!!!
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Old 04-26-2014, 02:48 AM
 
Location: Brisbane
3,359 posts, read 5,211,132 times
Reputation: 2694
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
Let's put this myth to rest.

Do I, as a Commonwealth citizen, have an easier time moving to Australia (a Commonwealth state) than an American does? No. Australia is an independent country, as Canada is, and as such, it makes its own rules for immigration. To Australians, I am a foreigner just as much as an American is.

Commonwealth citizens generally have no more rights moving to another Commonwealth nation than an American (i.e. not a member of the Commonwealth) does. Commonwealth citizens trying to immigrate to another Commonwealth country have to jump through the same hoops, answer the same questions, fill out the same forms, etc., as a non-Commonwealth citizen.

Americans who perpetuate the "well, all Commonwealth citizens are ultimately British and can move around freely within the Empire" myth would do well to educate themselves on modern geopolitics. To start with, the British Empire is long dead.
Lets not also forget the commonwealth of nations is a collection of 53 countries, of which 18 are in Africa, 12 in North America and 8 in Asia. Their could be a massive transfer of poorer immigrants to Australia the UK and Canada etc if there was any such agreement in place.

Last edited by danielsa1775; 04-26-2014 at 02:58 AM..
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Old 04-26-2014, 03:37 AM
 
2,604 posts, read 3,810,384 times
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The Commonwealth doesn't appear to have any benefits. The most positive thing I see is the Commonwealth Games otherwise I don't see any great purpose in it.
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Old 04-26-2014, 03:43 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,783 posts, read 15,452,080 times
Reputation: 2833
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bernie20 View Post
The Commonwealth doesn't appear to have any benefits. The most positive thing I see is the Commonwealth Games otherwise I don't see any great purpose in it.
I see it as more of an alumni association, of sorts. While I wouldn't say I'm a huge admirer of the British Empire, it wasn't all bad, and being 'Singaporean-Australian' I feel I've lived in the 'shadow' of the British Empire. The Indian Ocean could be considered the 'British' Ocean because if you look at a map of the British Empire at it's peak you can see it 'owned' most of the nations ringing it:



In a way it's no surprise Perth is possibly the most British city outside Europe by population.

I guess the shared familiarity of the English language and tropes like cricket form a sort of kinship between people from say the UK, Australia, India, Jamaica.etc.
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Old 04-26-2014, 03:52 AM
 
2,604 posts, read 3,810,384 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post

In a way it's no surprise Perth is possibly the most British city outside Europe by population.

I guess the shared familiarity of the English language and tropes like cricket form a sort of kinship between people from say the UK, Australia, India, Jamaica.etc.
There also a similar thing with rugby here with nations like South Africa and New Zealand. There are quite a few Saffas and Kiwis here.
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Old 04-26-2014, 03:58 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,783 posts, read 15,452,080 times
Reputation: 2833
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bernie20 View Post
There also a similar thing with rugby here with nations like South Africa and New Zealand. There are quite a few Saffas and Kiwis here.
Of course, the cultures are all pretty similar, South African English, although it has obvious differences, also has some clear similarities and seems quite related to Australian. It was more of a combo of Dutch and British, while the Australian accent was more Cockney-Irish. The NZ accent was English-Australian-Scottish. Even the Falkland Islands accent is uncannily like Australian, supporting the idea the Australian accent was/is very similar to the Cockney accent of the late 19th and early 20th century. I've seen old movies with what I assume were real Cockney accents of the time, and they're actually a bit different to the stereotypical Cockney of Lock Stock or even Michael Caine's Alfie, more Australian.
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Old 04-26-2014, 07:24 AM
 
Location: North West Northern Ireland.
20,695 posts, read 18,702,470 times
Reputation: 3107
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
I see it as more of an alumni association, of sorts. While I wouldn't say I'm a huge admirer of the British Empire, it wasn't all bad, and being 'Singaporean-Australian' I feel I've lived in the 'shadow' of the British Empire. The Indian Ocean could be considered the 'British' Ocean because if you look at a map of the British Empire at it's peak you can see it 'owned' most of the nations ringing it:



In a way it's no surprise Perth is possibly the most British city outside Europe by population.

I guess the shared familiarity of the English language and tropes like cricket form a sort of kinship between people from say the UK, Australia, India, Jamaica.etc.
There are no British cities in Europe.

Nowhere has a British population of 200,000. I don't think you can get it into your head that British people mostly migrate to anglophone areas.
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