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Old 09-15-2023, 03:37 PM
 
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Old 09-16-2023, 04:24 AM
 
Location: Great Britain
27,141 posts, read 13,429,141 times
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^^
In terms of the UK it's a small densely populated country which is dominated by London and a few other large city regions, so apartments and housing is different to many other parts of Europe. Over half (54%) of the accommodation in London is apartments and the same applies to some other large cities although to a lesser extent, however by contrast in some other regions the figure in relation to apartments is only around 10%, and there is a big difference by region, as well as by type of area such as urban and rural in the UK.

Town houses are also often terraced (row) or semi detached in London and other cities, and similar housing can be found in NYC and other US cities, the most famous examples being the New York Brown stones or the town houses in cities such as Boston.

There is a diversity of UK housing, ranging from city apartments and town houses through to suburban housing (including semi detached housing) through to traditional rural villages and cottages right through to very wealthy areas and private estates.

Office for National Statistics - Housing (2021)

Last edited by Brave New World; 09-16-2023 at 05:45 AM..
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Old 09-16-2023, 03:12 PM
 
Location: Florida
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The above seems to support my theory. I guess this settles it, it just took 33 pages!
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Old 09-17-2023, 04:51 AM
 
Location: Great Britain
27,141 posts, read 13,429,141 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FL_Expert View Post
The above seems to support my theory. I guess this settles it, it just took 33 pages!
Europe is a diverse continent, just as the US is a diverse country, and just as there are difference between parts of Europe there are also differences in relation to the US.

As for these type of threads they are generally started by the same trolls who tend to constantly make new accounts.

Nobody in Europe, is that bothered in relation to what Americans decide in relation to their own cities, and many Europeans enjoy visiting US cities.
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Old 09-17-2023, 01:18 PM
 
Location: Florida
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Originally Posted by Brave New World View Post
Europe is a diverse continent, just as the US is a diverse country, and just as there are difference between parts of Europe there are also differences in relation to the US.
It’s not that diverse really. Many of the European cities I’ve visited have followed the same general format with squares and whatnot, but different styling. Whether it’s Italian, Spanish, German, etc. they all tend to follow the same format.
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Old 09-17-2023, 07:50 PM
 
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Because we don't WANT to be Europe.

Is this some kind of trick question, or what?
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Old 09-18-2023, 02:28 AM
 
1,472 posts, read 1,342,969 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by masssachoicetts View Post
Three things.

1) it was the 1960s. Everywhere was racist back then. From the US to Australia to the UK to Canada.
2) America simply had substantially more visible minorities. Australia was 98%+ white around its cities. Canada was 96% white. The UK was 99% white. The USA was 75% white (1990). Places that saw hyper suburbanization were also way less white. Some metropolitan areas were like 50%+ non white. Cities, big ones, like Detroit and Cleveland and St. Louis and Philadelphia became less than 50% white by 1980. There was way more black and non-white folks in America than other countries.
3) 65 years later, what has changed? While the US has its race issues… lets not act like the UK absolutely loves its Indian/Pakistani and MENA migrants. Australia is also a pretty large hotbed for xenophobia. Its absolutely exists.

The US could just fit all these three anglo countries in (UK AUS CAN) three times and still have more people! Its an apples to oranges comparison that you are using to make “Americans” seem to hate darker people more than other countries lol. Like that would only apply to 55% or 192 million white non-hispanic americans.
I suspect a lot of folk outside the US find it interesting that many posters here equate "diversity" with race.

In 1960s Australia a large proportion of the population were migrants or refugees who arrived from all parts of Europe in the immediate aftermath of WW2. People who, twenty years earlier, had literally been fighting each other as combatants, or had seen their own city literally flattened by the "other side," ended up living next door to each other, and working next to each other.

There's a lot more to diversity than skin color.
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Old 09-18-2023, 05:43 AM
 
Location: Great Britain
27,141 posts, read 13,429,141 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FL_Expert View Post
It’s not that diverse really. Many of the European cities I’ve visited have followed the same general format with squares and whatnot, but different styling. Whether it’s Italian, Spanish, German, etc. they all tend to follow the same format.
Europe is very diverse in terms of climate ad culture and this is reflected in the different architecture and housing types.

In terms of the format of most traditional towns and cities, they tend to have a city centre and possible some type of gathering place such as a square, and it wasn't really until post WW2 and the rise of the motor car that this changed, and it was the US that embraced this change more than most other countries, hence the reason why many US cities are different in this respect.
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Old 09-18-2023, 11:15 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
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I want to drive my tractor to town and park it in the street in front of my house! (Which is where many EU farmers live).

I don't see that flying in your typical USA HOA or city ordinance.
NIMBY!

In general... the USA has had plenty of s-p-a-c-e for urban sprawl. And has been 'car dependant ' (and insistent). EU started with fiefdoms.
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Old 09-18-2023, 04:27 PM
 
Location: 215
2,234 posts, read 1,116,133 times
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Philly Boston and DC say "Hello"
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