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Old 04-18-2015, 12:33 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,607 posts, read 15,256,455 times
Reputation: 8696

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SE9 View Post
It's not about liking to drive, it's about having to.

In London, I don't have to drive as my every transport need is catered for. In Atlanta, I have little choice but to drive.

I like driving, but the pedestrian/multi-mode public transport oriented city lifestyle offered in London is miles better than car dependent Atlanta.
For you it is, for a lot of Americans being dependent on cars is no big deal, its just a way of life...

Atlanta is probably one of my favorite cities, i like London too but i would choose Atlanta first (for living of course)
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Old 04-18-2015, 12:34 PM
 
138 posts, read 80,822 times
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Because the roads are wider in the United States. Why would they want a one way system?

Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
For you it is, for a lot of Americans being dependent on cars is no big deal, its just a way of life...

Atlanta is probably one of my favorite cities, i like London too but i would choose Atlanta first (for living of course)
There are lots of areas in the UK where the people only drive cars too, don't be kidding yourself by listening to him.
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Old 04-18-2015, 12:39 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
62,407 posts, read 51,789,688 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jorge Bueno View Post
I'm curious what others think here... Why don't North American developers and city planners every try to emulate Western European towns or cities when building new suburbs/towns/redeveloping cities centers in North America, such as with plaza, piazzas, squares, more walkable streets, etc..?
Some do. That became a trend in architecture/neighborhood development back around the early 1990's. Studies found that building houses with a front porch facing a central square or park, and having amenities within walking distance deters crime.
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Old 04-18-2015, 12:40 PM
 
138 posts, read 80,822 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ladysolitude View Post
Honestly, outside of NYC and other major cities in the US public transportation is looked down upon. It is something poor people or students use and considered low class. In NYC you will find, lawyers, doctors ,teachers, students, writers, and stockbrokers all riding the subways with the homeless.

Where I live the commuter rail is heavily used by people for travel to NYC. We even drive to the train station. However, we need more access into NYC since most people where I live work there, but the NIMBYS oppose any type of expansion of public transportation including buses. Mind you these are the same people who every morning complain about train delays. When my cousins visited from London last year, they disliked our suburban life. Although they rented a car they felt you had to drive almost everywhere. They ended up taking the train 45 minutes daily to Manhattan where it is pretty walkable, more entertaining and has the subway.
Its considered low class here too.
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Old 04-18-2015, 02:12 PM
SE9
 
Location: London | Atlanta
219 posts, read 208,391 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
For you it is, for a lot of Americans being dependent on cars is no big deal, its just a way of life...

Atlanta is probably one of my favorite cities, i like London too but i would choose Atlanta first (for living of course)
Indeed, it's a way of life. An imposed one. You'd get used to it if you were born and raised in it.

Unfortunately, car dependency is less efficient, stunts urban densification and inhibits vibrancy. It's no coincidence that the great cities around the world constantly seek to improve PT provision and pedestrianism, as opposed to increasing car dependence, to improve themselves.
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Old 04-18-2015, 02:22 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,607 posts, read 15,256,455 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SE9 View Post
Indeed, it's a way of life. An imposed one. You'd get used to it if you were born and raised in it.

Unfortunately, car dependency is less efficient, stunts urban densification and inhibits vibrancy. It's no coincidence that the great cities around the world constantly seek to improve PT provision and pedestrianism, as opposed to increasing car dependence, to improve themselves.
No its not.

Traveling by car in a car dependent city is just as efficient as traveling by foot or train in a walkable city.

They are just two different set ups / modes of transportation.

The Orlando area and Las Vegas area are doing just fine being car dependent cities and being some of the most visited cities in the country at the same time.

Great cities around the world already have a urban/dense set up so it would make sense to improve their urban set up by bringing in more public transportation and building up the density.

The suburbs don't want that, they like their space and shopping at big box stores... don't see why it bothers people so much... its how THEY live.... i live in a very car centric area and people like it here, if they wanted to live a car free lifestyle they could easily move to Chicago if they wanted... however its mostly people from Chicago moving here than vice versa.
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Old 04-18-2015, 03:04 PM
 
1,711 posts, read 737,233 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
No its not.


The suburbs don't want that, they like their space and shopping at big box stores... don't see why it bothers people so much... its how THEY live.... i live in a very car centric area and people like it here, if they wanted to live a car free lifestyle they could easily move to Chicago if they wanted... however its mostly people from Chicago moving here than vice versa.
If urban planners could-somehow-get their way, we would end up with cities full of people who don't like cities.
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Old 04-18-2015, 03:48 PM
 
Location: Nassau County, NY
20 posts, read 22,567 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Homesickness View Post
Its considered low class here too.
Where I live most things that begin with the words public or county equates low class.
Public schools included unless they are in a wealthy district. Where I live extremely poor minorities or seniors take the bus. Yet 30 minutes west in NYC everyone takes the subway or bus. The only respectful form of public transportation is the commuter rail because you are paying $300.00 a month to take it. Other wise cars, big homes, and wide-open spaces are valued in the suburbs.
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Old 04-18-2015, 04:15 PM
 
Location: Nassau County, NY
20 posts, read 22,567 times
Reputation: 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I read comments like this all the time and I get lots of Europeans visiting me and I live in a fairly auto-dependent area no one has ever said anything negative and many are openly envious of the space we have, the pool, the trees, etc.

Now, where I live isn't like Houston or a place like that, and so there are attractive walkable areas not that far away either in the immediate area or in the major cities that are a couple of hours away from us.

But no one has ever said anything like: "Ewww, we're going to a restaurant and taking the car... that's so... 1957..."

I mean, where they live in outer Paris, Milan or Stockholm they pretty much do the same TBQH.
My family lives outside of London. I guess outside of shopping malls, box stores, crowded beaches, and chain restaurants Long Island can seem boring. That is why most young adults are abandoning it for NYC. I like the quiet and pitch dark nights. They seemed to enjoy the NYC night life more.

I am sure they drive in the uk they both own cars. They loved our big homes and space, but we have the worse drivers in New York State. Really, to go anywhere you have to jump on the parkway or endure streets that need repaving and traffic. I believe just being close to NYC attracted them to it. I made one trip out there with them and they were pros using the subway. I worked in NYC for a year and the subway maps still give me a migraine.
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Old 04-18-2015, 04:32 PM
 
138 posts, read 80,822 times
Reputation: 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ladysolitude View Post
Where I live most things that begin with the words public or county equates low class.
Public schools included unless they are in a wealthy district. Where I live extremely poor minorities or seniors take the bus. Yet 30 minutes west in NYC everyone takes the subway or bus. The only respectful form of public transportation is the commuter rail because you are paying $300.00 a month to take it. Other wise cars, big homes, and wide-open spaces are valued in the suburbs.
Lol, it is like that here too. We do have buses but its rural here so we just drive cars everywhere which is why I was whining about the one way streets earlier.

There is a double decker bus that goes by my house every few hours but like 1 person uses it. Its very common to drive by buses here and they will be empty. Pickup trucks are very common here too which again is another misconception about the British Isles.

I always get caught behind old people and say 'someone get them off the road and onto the buses'.
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