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Old 06-27-2015, 06:55 PM
 
Location: Lakeland, Florida
6,253 posts, read 10,860,758 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
Portland, to me, actually looks very Midwestern in built form. The bungalow neighborhoods that dominate don't look unlike those you would see in the inner suburbs of Detroit or St. Louis.
The downtown is busy in the daytime with office workers, people at the court house, and shoppers. Of course its always busy with the tons of homeless, that wander about and panhandle. Yes the bungalow neighborhoods do resemble Midwestern form. My comparison was really in reference to the downtown, basically the walkability and all the European transit. that crosses the downtown and across the river. The vibe of Portland isn't European at all, its radical politics, hipsters and all that homelessness one see's. Never understood why Portland allowed itself. to be so overwhelmed by Homelessness.
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Old 06-28-2015, 12:17 PM
 
Location: Placitas, New Mexico
1,009 posts, read 1,706,659 times
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Boston sure feels different largely because it is dense and compact with narrow streets in the center, but European? I don't think so. It is still very American.
I think a city like Quebec City or some of the colonial cities of Mexico are much more European in feeling.
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Old 06-28-2015, 01:29 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,607 posts, read 15,384,004 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DJX3000 View Post
Yeah, I think Portland is the number 2, and it would be my second choice, but it rains a lot and it seems a little far from any big city.
Portland is just a dense American city, not much of a European vibe at all.
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Old 06-28-2015, 06:21 PM
 
92 posts, read 117,957 times
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I think this area, which is not downtown Boston, looks pretty European:
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Br...dbd207!6m1!1e1
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Old 06-28-2015, 06:42 PM
 
8,985 posts, read 5,216,130 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DJX3000 View Post
I think this area, which is not downtown Boston, looks pretty European:
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Br...dbd207!6m1!1e1
How does that look "European"? Is it because one building has the faux British look?

Looks like a typical inner suburb in the Northeastern U.S. to me.
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Old 06-29-2015, 06:52 AM
 
9,983 posts, read 8,813,869 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
Portland is just a dense American city, not much of a European vibe at all.
Portland has 600,000 people on a massive land of 145 sq miles, and you call it dense?

Vancouver has the same population on 44 sq miles, Philadelphia and Montreal have 1.5/1.6 million on 150/160 sq miles, and I don't even call that dense.

Paris has 2.3 million on 45 sq miles, that's called dense.
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Old 06-29-2015, 07:23 AM
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
44,412 posts, read 34,604,870 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
Portland is just a dense American city, not much of a European vibe at all.
Portland has similar residential densities to Minneapolis / St. Paul. The downtown feels livelier but it's nowhere close in scale to a similarly size European city. Compared to most newer American cities, the downtown is less office-only and better integrated with the surrounding neighborhoods, but it was obviously much less lower density than say, Boston.
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Old 06-29-2015, 02:06 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,607 posts, read 15,384,004 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
Portland has 600,000 people on a massive land of 145 sq miles, and you call it dense?
Yeah i'd say that is pretty much typical for American cities

Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
Vancouver has the same population on 44 sq miles, Philadelphia and Montreal have 1.5/1.6 million on 150/160 sq miles, and I don't even call that dense.

Paris has 2.3 million on 45 sq miles, that's called dense.
Ok
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Old 06-29-2015, 02:09 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,607 posts, read 15,384,004 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Portland has similar residential densities to Minneapolis / St. Paul. The downtown feels livelier but it's nowhere close in scale to a similarly size European city. Compared to most newer American cities, the downtown is less office-only and better integrated with the surrounding neighborhoods, but it was obviously much less lower density than say, Boston.
Still, all these places (Portland, Minneapolis/St. Paul and Boston) have more dense environments compared to where most Americans live.

Dense doesn't = European and if you are not as dense as a European city that doesn't mean people can't find that place dense.
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Old 06-29-2015, 03:28 PM
 
172 posts, read 111,610 times
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The figure population / sq miles is not necessarily a good measure for the perceived density of a city. For example the city Bremen in Germany with a pop of 549,000 on 326km² = 1,685/km² feels surely a lot denser than Portland with a pop of 584,000 on 348km² = 1,678/km². In Bremen 30% of the city area is used by agriculture. The population density In Düsseldorf is 2,754/km². 21% of the area is used for agriculture, 13% are forestal area, 13% are green spaces. Only 20% is used by housing. The density of the populated areas is thus very high.
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