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Old 06-29-2015, 04:41 PM
 
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ok, back to the original question, if Boston isn't, which one is it? I know most of the people are saying none, but there is always a closest one.
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Old 06-29-2015, 04:44 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQSunseeker View Post
Boston sure feels different largely because it is dense and compact with narrow streets in the center, but European? I don't think so. It is still very American.
I think a city like Quebec City or some of the colonial cities of Mexico are much more European in feeling.
As a QC resident, I'd like to qualify this comment -- Vieux-Québec (the old town) i.e. maybe 2% of the land area of the city and less than 2% of the population, may look European. But there's nothing European about the rest of the city -- where everybody actually lives.
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Old 06-29-2015, 06:02 PM
 
Location: Placitas, New Mexico
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Yes, I agree completely. But that old town is so unlike North American city centers.
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Old 06-29-2015, 07:40 PM
 
Location: Peoria, Illinois
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I am an American guy who lived and worked for several years in both France & Italy.

I would say that San Francisco is the most European in the States.
Montréal is the most European in Canada.
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Old 06-30-2015, 01:01 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia Area
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As an American who has traveled to Europe, I would have to say that the most European looking city is Washington, D.C. In terms of cityscape, D.C. has wide streets, European looking architecture, and the overall density that many European cities have. D.C. also has a height limit of 197 ft. Not a lot of European cities have major height, except for London, La Defense, Frankfurt, Milan, Warsaw, and Moscow. D.C. reminds me of Paris.

A lot of people may disagree with me, but Philadelphia does have a European vibe to it. One thing that is similar is the amount of density near Center City. Philadelphia has rowhomes, which remind me of London and Paris. Philadelphia also has the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, which is similar in many ways to the Champs-Elysees.

I have yet to travel to Boston, but I will try to this summer. Boston does get compared to Philadelphia a lot, though I generally hear that Philly has a livelier downtown than Boston. Honestly, Center City/University City provide one of the top 5 downtown experience of all large American cities.
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Old 06-30-2015, 04:22 AM
 
Location: western East Roman Empire
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I have lived in NYC (many years), SF (years), Boston (years), Miami (many years), and some small towns (many years) in the US; in Naples (month), Milan (many years), Rome (month) and some smaller towns and villages (many years) in Italy; in Lisbon and Coimbra and some small villages in Portugal (years); Salamanca in Spain (month); some small cities, towns and villages in Greece (many years); and Brussels (month); as well as some Spanish colonial and coastal cities in South America (many years).

In my view, the main answer to the OP's question is that any place is suitable as long as you use your imagination: since global circumnavigation and firearms around 1500 and onwards, the European influence is almost everywhere where there is civilization.


To be sure, certain pockets and aspects of NYC, SF, Boston, probably also Philadelphia and DC, resemble mainly London - and why wouldn't they? - and some northern European cities (of those, I would say NYC the most, but not based on any measurable criteria, just imagination and impressions), while in some respects, using a lot of imagination and imitation name places, parts of Miami and elsewhere in Florida can be reminiscent of Mediterranean Europe.

So, if you move to Boston, you will find bits and pieces of UK and northern Europe, especially if you imagine it and really want to.

On a practical level, yes there are many educated and cultural people and public transportation is adequate, on the one hand, but it is bitterly cold in the winter and the housing stock is old and expensive, on the other, unless money is no object and you can afford the housing of your choice (e.g. large condo in new high rise downtown or mansion in Brookline).

Good Luck!

Last edited by bale002; 06-30-2015 at 04:34 AM..
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Old 06-30-2015, 04:56 PM
 
122 posts, read 57,352 times
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Originally Posted by DJX3000 View Post
I've never been in Boston but I've seen a lot of videos about the city and its surroundings, it looks a lot different from the rest of the US. It has a lot of nice architecture, decent public transportation and it seems like a very cultural city, also pretty safe.

It has a lot of history and it's built in a circle or semi circle shape, like most of big European cities.

I would like to know if Europeans think Boston has some kind of a European vibe. What do you guys think?

I would totally move to Europe but right now it's impossible (maybe in 10 years ), but for now I am thinking of moving to Boston, since it's the most similar to Europe ? also it is close to Montreal and New York.

For Europeans, do you think Boston is the most European city in America? I know it's still an American city and for some people it's impossible to compare.
To me Boston is the most European city in the U.S., well closer to English perhaps, both in its appearance and its infrastructure, especially compared to New York where I live which is nothing like Europe. I think San Francisco also has a European flavor, but not as much history as Boston.

The Boston Common resembles an English/London park more than anywhere else in the U.S. I've seen. Even the use of the word "common" is British. Much of U.S. architecture is derived from English architecture, especially in the Northeast. There's a good amount of Georgian architecture in New England based very much on Georgian architecture in England except in New England it's generally wood (using local resources) versus cement in England. Also, to me, Boston still has a pretty preppy and WASPY vibe.

Boston also seems to have a pretty good infrastructure and public improvements which whenever I'm there always reminds me of a small European city.

The city center is made up of old winding lanes and "high" streets similar to those in England and let's not forget the Irish demographic and Irish pubs.
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Old 06-30-2015, 08:35 PM
 
1,738 posts, read 4,107,813 times
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Originally Posted by bale002 View Post
I have lived in NYC (many years), SF (years), Boston (years), Miami (many years), and some small towns (many years) in the US; in Naples (month), Milan (many years), Rome (month) and some smaller towns and villages (many years) in Italy; in Lisbon and Coimbra and some small villages in Portugal (years); Salamanca in Spain (month); some small cities, towns and villages in Greece (many years); and Brussels (month); as well as some Spanish colonial and coastal cities in South America (many years)
OMG! HOW OLD ARE YOU???

Do people even live that long?
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Old 07-01-2015, 07:49 AM
 
Location: Brussels
398 posts, read 271,763 times
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I would say on architecture, ethnicity and way of living, Buenos Aires is the most European city in America hands off. It strongly reminds me of a mix of Madrid and Paris some 20 years ago.

In the USA, some parts of NYC, Boston, DC look pretty European to me.
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Old 07-02-2015, 05:24 PM
 
92 posts, read 106,988 times
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Originally Posted by kikebxl View Post
I would say on architecture, ethnicity and way of living, Buenos Aires is the most European city in America hands off. It strongly reminds me of a mix of Madrid and Paris some 20 years ago.

In the USA, some parts of NYC, Boston, DC look pretty European to me.
Yes, Buenos Aires is the most European in South America. I think NYC is way too crowded and busy to look European, its architecture maybe...
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