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Old 07-22-2017, 08:23 PM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
9,639 posts, read 5,515,137 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Radik Safin View Post
For those who have not lost interest in etymology.

Chinese word 厚 (hu) [thick, dense] derives from Bashkir word ҡуйы (quyı) [dense].
Kyrgyz коюу (koyu) dense.
Chinese word 厚 (hu) [thick, dense] is cognate with Slavic words.

Ukrainian густий (hu-styy) dense.
Macedonian густа (gusta) dense.
You're just picking the most random words.

I can do that with Arabic and other unrelated languages, and make some sort of "connections" with the vocabulary.

Give up.
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Old 07-23-2017, 11:01 PM
 
101 posts, read 84,764 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anhityk View Post
Halbaga and lusikka are not similar imo at all
Finnish lusikka comes from Russian "ложка" (lozhka) obviously.
Why do you think so?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
We haven't lost interest in etymology. We're just not interested in your fantasy etymology.
It is better not to communicate with Russians.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethereal View Post
You're just picking the most random words.

I can do that with Arabic and other unrelated languages, and make some sort of "connections" with the vocabulary.

Give up.
You are not alone. The painful theme.

================================================== =

Radik Safin
Bashkir – Russian

Spanish word 'hormiga' [an ant] derives from Bashkir word 'ҡырмыҫҡа' (qormisqa or ckirmiscka)[an ant].

How did the Bashkir ants find themselves in Spain?

Last edited by Rozenn; 07-27-2017 at 03:06 PM.. Reason: Copy
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Old 07-25-2017, 09:44 AM
 
Location: SE Estonia
2,025 posts, read 949,163 times
Reputation: 679
Quote:
Why do you think so?
The Estonian word for spoon is lusikas and that originates from Russian, that is the same and they wrote so in almost every book what is talking about language.

Here is some information what I have found about russian loans in estonian language:
Spoiler
Что касается словарного фонда эстонского языка, то в нём также мало общего со словарным фондом русского языка, как было уже указано выше. Но всё же в эстонском языке имеется довольно много заимствованных слов из древне-русского и русского языков, что свидетельствует о том, что между прибалтийско-финскими племенами и русскими существовали уже в далёком прошлом тесные дружественные культурные и экономические отношения. На это указал уже выдающийся эстонский языковед Михкел Веске в своем труде Славяно-финские культурные отношения по данным языка (Казань, 1890). Здесь приведём как примеры лишь некоторые типичные заимствования в эстонском языке из древне-русского и русского языков:

hirs (жьрдь, жердь),
lusikas (лъжька, ложка),
ike (иго),
ndal неделя),
vrav (верея, ворота),
und (уда, удочка),
turg (търгъ, торг),
sirp (сьрпъ, серп),
aken (окно),
sahk (соха),
vaba (свободный),
tlkima (толковать), 'переводить',
raamat (грамота) 'книга',
rist (крьстъ, крест),
kasukas (кожух),
saan (сани),
uulits (улица),
saabas (сапог),
niit (нить) и т. д.

*стонский язык

Last edited by Anhityk; 07-25-2017 at 10:12 AM..
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Old 07-26-2017, 08:14 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
63,787 posts, read 52,996,518 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Radik Safin View Post
Romanian "bașca" 1) separately, apart 2) besides.
Turkish "başka" 1) other 2) except for.
All this means is that the Ottoman Empire salted Romanian with some of its lexicon. (As well as certain grammar elements. I'll let you figure that out.)
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Old 08-01-2017, 03:38 AM
 
101 posts, read 84,764 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Radik Safin View Post
2. English word tan is derived from Bashkir word тән (tan) а body.
Dense - having relatively high density.
[Middle English, from Latin dēnsus.]

The fisrt past of Latin word "dēnsus" [dense] is derived from Bashkir word тән (tan) а body.
The Latin word is more close to the Turkish.
Azerbaijani "tәn" [a body], "bədən" physique, a body.
Turkish "ten" [a body], "beden" a torso, a body.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Radik Safin View Post

Chinese word 厚 (hu) [thick, dense] derives from Bashkir word ҡуйы (quyı) [dense].
Kyrgyz коюу (koyu) dense.
Chinese word 厚 (hu) [thick, dense] is cognate with Slavic words.

Ukrainian густий (hu-styy) dense.
Macedonian густа (gusta) dense.
Chinese word 厚 (hu) [thick, dense] is cognate with Yakut word хойуу (hoyu) [dense] and Khakass word хойығ (hoyigh) dense.
Slavic words are cognate with Mongolian word "шигүү" (shig) thick, dense.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anhityk View Post
The Estonian word for spoon is lusikas and that originates from Russian, that is the same and they wrote so in almost every book what is talking about language.
Estonian "lusi-kas" a spoon.
Serbo-Croatian "кашика" (kaika) - a spoon.
What do you think about the similarity of Serbo-Croatian and Estonian word?
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Old 08-01-2017, 11:26 AM
 
Location: SE Estonia
2,025 posts, read 949,163 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Radik Safin View Post
Estonian "lusi-kas" – a spoon.
Serbo-Croatian "кашика" (kašika) - a spoon.
What do you think about the similarity of Serbo-Croatian and Estonian word?
Well, may be the second parts of these words lusikas and kašika are a bit similar but might that similarity, if it is a similarity at all, be completely occasional as Estonians and Serbo-Coats have not had contacts? Estonians and Finnics in general have had contacts with East-Slavs as they are neighbours what Serbo-Croats certainly arent.
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Old 08-09-2017, 10:10 PM
 
101 posts, read 84,764 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Radik Safin View Post
Chinese word爸爸 (bba) [father] and Persian word بابا (baba) [father] are related, isn't it?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Radik Safin View Post
Georgian word ბაბუა (babua) means grandfather.
It comes from Turkish phrase "byk baba" grandfather, where "baba" father, "byk" eldest, great, big.
However in the Georgian language these words switched places: baba +byk.
And furthermore the phrase was chopped off from both ends : ba/ba +by/k = baby= babua.
Maori (New Zealand) word "рāра" [father, uncle, dad] and Spanish word "pap" [father, dad] are related.
Maori "whakapapa" genealogy, genealogical table.
The first part of this word perhaps is related to the Burmese word ဘကြီး (bhakyee) an uncle.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...one-of-us-left
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Old 08-10-2017, 03:31 AM
 
404 posts, read 230,683 times
Reputation: 462
Pretty sure that OP had a brain aneurysm and are now stuck in an infinite loop.
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Old 08-10-2017, 04:40 PM
 
592 posts, read 394,322 times
Reputation: 1267
This entire thread is like a bad dream from which we cannot wake up.
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Old 08-20-2017, 05:07 AM
 
101 posts, read 84,764 times
Reputation: 28
I know you weren't born with these hateful viewsDon't hang around people who carry Nazi flags, give Nazi salutes or shout Nazi slogans.
Arnold Schwarzenegger


Quote:
Originally Posted by Radik Safin View Post
Maori (New Zealand) word "рāра" [father, uncle, dad] and Spanish word "pap" [father, dad] are related.
Maori "whakapapa" genealogy, genealogical table.
The first part of this word perhaps is related to the Burmese word ဘကြီး (bhakyee) an uncle.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...one-of-us-left

Turkish word 'baba' [father] also is related to Zulu word 'baba' [father, dad; mister, sir] and Swahili word 'baba' [father, (paternal) uncle; ancestor, forebear; patron, protector].
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