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Old 04-20-2017, 09:15 AM
 
110 posts, read 114,995 times
Reputation: 32

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Radik Safin View Post

Sanskrit word बाल (bāla) [young, youthful, a youngling, a cab] and Shor word "пала" (pala)
[a child, a baby] are related.
Khakass "пала" (pala) - a child, a baby.
Kumyk "бала" (bala) - a child, a baby.

Sanskrit word बाल (bāla) [young, youthful, a youngling, a cab] comes from Bashkir word "бала" (bala) -
1) a child, a baby, an infant; 2) a fetus, an embryo.

This word is available in almost all Turkic languages.
Marathi बाळ (bāa) – a baby, a child.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Radik Safin View Post
You can read about the origin of the word "Stonehenge" here
https://www.amazon.com/British-Are-D.../dp/1471020754
In February of this year someone bought my book. I express my great gratitude to this man.
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Old 05-04-2017, 12:14 PM
 
110 posts, read 114,995 times
Reputation: 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Radik Safin View Post
Serbo-Croatian (Slavic language) word «башка/bashka» [separately, in isolation] comes from the Bashkir word «башҡа» (bashсka) [other, apart, separately].
Romanian "bașca" – 1) separately, apart 2) besides.
Turkish "başka" – 1) other 2) except for.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Radik Safin View Post
Scottish Gaelic word 'iul' [direction, a course] comes from Bashkir word "юл" (yul or youl) - road, way.
What about English?
Other Turkic Languages.
Azerbaijani "yol" – road, way, direction.
Turkish "yol" – road, way, course.
Mishar "юл" (yul) – road, way.
Where is this word in English?
Where is this word in Welsh?
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Old 05-04-2017, 12:27 PM
 
6,128 posts, read 2,000,291 times
Reputation: 2243
Nobody cares, stop talking to yourself.
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Old 06-02-2017, 12:48 AM
 
110 posts, read 114,995 times
Reputation: 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Razza94 View Post
Nobody cares, stop talking to yourself.
It would be better if you helped to keep the Turkic and Finno-Ugric languages in Russia.

English word "a spoon" and Udmurt word are cognates.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Udmurt_language
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Radik Safin
Bashkir - Russian

Sanskrit word बाल (bāla) [young, youthful, a youngling, a cab] and Shor word "пала" (pala)
[a child, a baby] are related.
Khakass "пала" (pala) - a child, a baby.
Kumyk "бала" (bala) - a child, a baby.

Sanskrit word बाल (bāla) [young, youthful, a youngling, a cab] comes from Bashkir word "бала" (bala) -
1) a child, a baby, an infant; 2) a fetus, an embryo.

This word is available in almost all Turkic languages.

Last edited by Rozenn; 07-27-2017 at 03:08 PM.. Reason: Copy
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Old 06-04-2017, 12:11 AM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
9,989 posts, read 6,523,227 times
Reputation: 4914
You are just wrong. Give up man. And what racism? Since when languages have skin colour? -_-

If anything, Afro-Asiatic languages would be the proto-Nostratic languages, because Afro-Asiatic is the oldest language family. Of course, I wouldn't count on it. But it still makes more sense than a Turkic language being the "mother" language of Indo-European, Uralic and Afro-Asiatic (which is MORE ancient).
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Old 06-05-2017, 01:47 PM
 
Location: SE Estonia
2,284 posts, read 1,165,710 times
Reputation: 761
Quote:
Originally Posted by Radik Safin View Post
These Germanic words are derived from the Finnish word "lusikka" (lusikalla) – a spoon.
The Finnish word "lusikalla" is related to the Mongolian word "халбага" (halbaga) – a spoon.
.
Halbaga and lusikka are not similar imo at all
Finnish lusikka comes from Russian "ложка" (lozhka) obviously.
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Old 06-21-2017, 11:02 PM
 
110 posts, read 114,995 times
Reputation: 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Radik Safin View Post
R. Bouckaert. Mapping the Origins and Expansion of the Indo-European Language Family. Science, 2012.

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/pubman/ite...BE%80%E3%80%82

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethereal View Post
If anything, Afro-Asiatic languages would be the proto-Nostratic languages, because Afro-Asiatic is the oldest language family. Of course, I wouldn't count on it. But it still makes more sense than a Turkic language being the "mother" language of Indo-European, Uralic and Afro-Asiatic (which is MORE ancient).
It's truly unbelievable.
You have a very cool sense of humor.

from The Telegraph:

1. That's not Queen. That's how the DUP travel these days.
2. English word ‘tan’ is derived from Bashkir word ‘тән’ (tan) – а body.
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Old 06-21-2017, 11:55 PM
 
6,128 posts, read 2,000,291 times
Reputation: 2243
Someone put this weird thread out of its misery.

Last edited by Razza94; 06-22-2017 at 12:04 AM..
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Old 07-20-2017, 05:13 AM
 
110 posts, read 114,995 times
Reputation: 32
For those who have not lost interest in etymology.

Chinese word 厚 (hςu) [thick, dense] derives from Bashkir word ‘ҡуйы’ (quyı) [dense].
Kyrgyz ‘коюу’ (koyu) – dense.
Chinese word 厚 (hςu) [thick, dense] is cognate with Slavic words.

Ukrainian ‘густий’ (hu-styy) – dense.
Macedonian ‘густа’ (gusta) – dense.
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Old 07-20-2017, 12:25 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
69,057 posts, read 60,226,649 times
Reputation: 63083
We haven't lost interest in etymology. We're just not interested in your fantasy etymology.
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