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Old 01-20-2017, 09:59 PM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
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*Lee (English surname) and Li (Chinese) "Glade" in English, "power, capability, beautiful" in Chinese

*Farris (Scottish) and Faris (Arabic) - "Vigor" and "Knight", respectively

*Maher (Irish) and Maher (Arabic) - "Kind" in Gaelic and "Talented" in Arabic

*Osman (English) and Osman (Arabic) - "Good fame" and "Snake, chosen one", respectively

*Atto (Russian and Danish) and Atto (Aramaic) - "Eighteen, fisherman" and "Flag", respectively

*Sada (Semitic) and Sada (Japanese) - "Good luck" and "Pure one", respectively

Any other "name homonyms"?
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Old 01-21-2017, 05:05 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Ethereal View Post
*Lee (English surname) and Li (Chinese) "Glade" in English, "power, capability, beautiful" in Chinese

*Farris (Scottish) and Faris (Arabic) - "Vigor" and "Knight", respectively

*Maher (Irish) and Maher (Arabic) - "Kind" in Gaelic and "Talented" in Arabic

*Osman (English) and Osman (Arabic) - "Good fame" and "Snake, chosen one", respectively

*Atto (Russian and Danish) and Atto (Aramaic) - "Eighteen, fisherman" and "Flag", respectively

*Sada (Semitic) and Sada (Japanese) - "Good luck" and "Pure one", respectively

Any other "name homonyms"?
My grandmother was a Maher but it can also be spelt Meagher. It would originally have had the O prefix. It meant hospital or kindly.

Lee is also a common Irish surname. There is a lot of variations as well such as McAlea, McAlee, MacAlea, MacLee, McLee, MacLees, McLees, MacLeas, McLeas, O'Lees, O'Leas, Lee and many more.
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Old 01-21-2017, 11:20 AM
 
Location: Hanau, Germany
1,773 posts, read 818,383 times
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Kahn (German: flat-bottomed boat; Oliver Kahn, Dominique Strauss-Kahn) and Khan (Mongolian: Ruler; common surname in India)
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Old 01-21-2017, 11:40 AM
 
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King (English: Tribal leader)
King (Chinese: Variant of surnames Jin and Ching. Means Gold among other things)
King (American Jewish: Variant of König, Koenig, Küng)
King (Ashkenazi Jewish of ornamental origin)
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Old 01-21-2017, 03:03 PM
 
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Lee is not Irish, it is British, a common name with English gypsies . The lines between Irish and British in most things is blurred anyway,
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Old 01-21-2017, 06:40 PM
 
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Originally Posted by England Dan View Post
Lee is not Irish, it is British, a common name with English gypsies . The lines between Irish and British in most things is blurred anyway,
I meant "hospitable" for Maher/Meager not "hospital".

Anyway Lee is also an Irish name.

As a native Irish surname, Lee is derived from the Gaelic name Mac Laoidhigh, which comes from the word "laoidh" which means "a poem:" or from Mac Giolla Iosa, which means "son of the devotee of Jesus".

The surname Lee was first found in Connacht where they were prominent in the west being associated as hereditary physicians to the O'Flahertys.

https://www.houseofnames.com/lee-family-crest/Irish

The name Lee in Ireland is derived from either Anglo settlers or from native Gaelic Septs who adopted Lee as the anglicized form of their name. Gaelic Septs who did this include the O'Laoidhigh and Mac an Leagha Septs based in the Provinces of Connaught and Munster respectively.

Lee in Ireland could be from English origin. Lee is also an old Irish family name stemming from families of O'Lee and MacLee. This helps to account for the widespread location of the name in Ireland.

There is more information in The Book of Irish Families, Great & Small

https://books.google.com.au/books?id...0irish&f=false

There is also the River Lee in Cork.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/River_Lee
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Old 01-22-2017, 02:05 PM
 
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Thanks for that detailed reply Bern; things ( couldn't think of another word)between Ireland and Britain are misty to say the least and that includes surnames. A common example is Barton, the books say Saxon origin ( as they all do), meaning a place where barley was sown. Barton is a derivative word for Briton , and is Brythonic , not Saxon .
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Old 01-22-2017, 02:10 PM
 
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Read Arthur and the lost Kingdoms by Scottish author Alastair Moffat, a new look at the Dark Ages.
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Old 01-24-2017, 05:24 AM
 
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Originally Posted by England Dan View Post
Thanks for that detailed reply Bern; things ( couldn't think of another word)between Ireland and Britain are misty to say the least and that includes surnames. A common example is Barton, the books say Saxon origin ( as they all do), meaning a place where barley was sown. Barton is a derivative word for Briton , and is Brythonic , not Saxon .
No problems England Dan. Yes I do agree with you. I'm researching a Great Grandmother and her surname was Leland. It could be of English or Scottish origin. I'm going with most probably Scots due to more likelihood but not really sure.

A bit OT for this thread but Smith is another name that in Ireland could be from English origin or from the Irish name MacGowan. A lot of Irish surnames were Anglicised so that can be confusing as well.
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Old 08-07-2017, 02:04 AM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
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Any others?
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