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Old 03-10-2017, 07:31 AM
 
Location: Macao
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More like the U.S.

They are both in North America.

Kind of like how Minnesota is more similar to Canada than it is to Australia.
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Old 03-10-2017, 12:19 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakery Hill View Post
Isn't that just geography, and the large neighbour effect, though? The whole Canada-US dynamic is eerily similar in a lot of ways to the NZ-Australia relationship. Kiwis even like to distance or distinguish themselves from Australia, as Canadians do from the US. In some ways its almost like two pairs of siblings, that are almost like collective twins. The smaller siblings are focussed a lot more social programs and welfare, while the larger siblings take a more active role in global affairs; both larger siblings have pretty noisey and full-on political scenes compared to the smaller twins, but are quite OK with that.......the smaller two like to view their history as lacking some of the darker sides they see in their older brothers, both of whom seem more at ease in acknowledge the incongruities, paradoxes, darker moments and ambiguities of their pasts...
A lot of it has to do with ignorance. New Zealanders, as do Canadians, are mistaken for another Nationality. Same with Austrians explaining they aren't German.

So these groups get accused of being insecure,(mainly Canadians it seems ) or lacking their own culture, when really what they are doing is explaining who they really are and not what people think they are.

I've experienced this in real life and on this board. Canadians are accused of being nothing but " not Americans" and when differences are brought up, we are shot down

God forbid we even try and do anything to preserve and create our own culture.
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Old 03-10-2017, 12:20 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Originally Posted by Razza94 View Post
In terms of accent, it's often nearly impossible to tell them apart.

Except for the ones who say things like: "Ay, see you aboot", and "Ay! There's a Moose on the loose in my hoose!"
Totally depends where in the US and Canada the person is from. There are many words where the emphasis is said differently. Permit, and detail are just two. I can tell some Americans by the way they pronounce it.
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Old 03-10-2017, 12:21 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
It's very apparent in relation to Australia, and surprising when you consider Canada is quite a bit larger in area and population.
I sometimes think Americans know more about Australia than they do Canada.
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Old 03-10-2017, 12:22 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Originally Posted by GoodHombre View Post
Mexico is also very close to the US, but Tijuana doesn't really look like California.
Totally different history and language. NY State borders Quebec for example.

Last edited by Natnasci; 03-10-2017 at 01:05 PM..
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Old 03-10-2017, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
More like the U.S.

They are both in North America.

Kind of like how Minnesota is more similar to Canada than it is to Australia.
There are 23 countries in North America.
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Old 03-10-2017, 12:29 PM
 
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I live in a US /Canada border city and if I go 100 miles north or go 100 miles south either way it's very similar. You'll know your in a different country but it feels very similar.

I probably have more in common culturally with Canadians than I do with people in Arizona.
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Old 03-10-2017, 12:53 PM
 
263 posts, read 75,036 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Return2FL View Post
A slightly uneasy truce? That seems like a bit of drama to me. When I think of uneasy truces, I think of Israel and the Arab world, Sudan, the Ukraine, etc. The US and Canada have differences, but sheesh....

It is the largest undefended border in the world. Many Canadians spend months of the year living in the US, it is the number one tourist destination for Canadians and Canada is the number two destination for Americans. The US is Canada's number one trading partner and Canada is the number two trading partner of the US. Canadians do not stand out in the US (except for their license plates when there is a lot of traffic ) and Americans do not stand out in Canada. Many have family on both sides of the border and many marry on the opposite side of the border. Our governments share vast amounts of information, have special agreements for visitors to each other's countries and work together on many issues.

That is not an uneasy truce.

This sums up my feelings and experience as i have seen as well. From what I have personally observed there seems to be a good relationship with a friendly sibling type rivalry between us and our friends to the North. We don't always agree on everything but at the end of the day were more alike than not and know we have each other's back.
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Old 03-10-2017, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drinkthekoolaid View Post
This sums up my feelings and experience as i have seen as well. From what I have personally observed there seems to be a good relationship with a friendly sibling type rivalry between us and our friends to the North. We don't always agree on everything but at the end of the day were more alike than not and know we have each other's back.
Noting of course that Canada's foreign policy differs from the US. Cuba for instance and us not joining you in the last Gulf War.
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Old 03-10-2017, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drinkthekoolaid View Post
I live in a US /Canada border city and if I go 100 miles north or go 100 miles south either way it's very similar. You'll know your in a different country but it feels very similar.

I probably have more in common culturally with Canadians than I do with people in Arizona.
Near the border absolutely. The changes at first seem subtle, although I'm constantly amazed at how many people in Seattle have never been to Vancouver, or how many in Spokane haven't even been to BC.
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