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Old 03-10-2017, 08:22 PM
 
Location: Canada
3,167 posts, read 3,165,792 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BMI View Post
I get your point.

Though Canada does have cowboys... in southern Alberta, SW Saskatchewan, and interior BC.
Huge ranches, some still old school.

Also some semi-arid landscapes too, in same locations as cowboys/ranches.
Not nearly as huge areas as in western US.
Yeah cowboy culture extends from Northern Mexico across the plains all the way up into Canada. These plains regions also share a similar native american culture. Athabascan languages were spoken from Alaska down to Northern Mexico.
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Old 03-10-2017, 09:35 PM
 
Location: Both coasts
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Lived in Canada for awhile, and have spent extensive time in Australia & UK.

Day to day life, generally more like the US (Northern states). Although Not culture shock, it still has a different feel than the US.

However, demographics. Canadian demographics are more like Australian, and all the implications surrounding- more Asian-influenced, no Latino or distinct Black subculture. "Urban" population dispersed across just a handful of cities. Although yes I find Canadians to still be very different from Australians- in their demeanor, outlook. Canadians and Brits are far more polite than Australians.

Educationally, institutionally- Canada is probably more like the other countries than the US.
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Old 03-11-2017, 03:51 PM
 
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Commonwealth countries. At least, the Anglosphere (anglophone) ones.

We have a lot in common with some of the Northern U.S. states, sure (Alaska, Maine, Vermont, Minnesota, North Dakota... ) but there's quite a bit that makes us different too. Scratch the surface, and the differences can suddenly seem quite deep. We take a lot of subtle things for granted... institutions, education systems, our economic interests, but even some other things like international affairs... when you get down to discussing some of these matters, you suddenly see how vastly different the point of view can be.

The U.S. has been a superpower for just about a century now... that gives Americans such a different outlook on many topics. Also, as a much larger country, with a huge population, and the cultural influence its had.... differences are huge. Other Commonwealth countries share history and customs with Canada, but a different outlook based on relative influence compared to the U.S. too.
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Old 03-11-2017, 04:38 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
9,139 posts, read 6,351,350 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Same here. There isn't much difference between Michigan and Ontario. Particularly the rural areas, and the smaller cities and towns. In Michigan, we also say ''eh?", we have maple syrup fresh from the trees, we play euchre. It shocked me when years later I heard those were unique Canadian things that only Canadians did.

I researched the euchre-playing, ''eh"-saying Americans...and its around 40-50 million Americans....throughout the Northern parts of the Midwest..which is an even larger population than all of Canada itself.

Granted, the U.S. is a big place, and there is fantastic diversity, and much of the U.S. isn't like that 40-50 million in the upper MIdwest.....but still. Canada feels very culturally similar to a Midwesterner.
That part of Canada you mean.
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Old 03-11-2017, 05:38 PM
 
3,435 posts, read 2,300,112 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
That part of Canada you mean.
Exactly...The Maritimes aren't Midwestern, nor are Quebec, the Prairies, the Rockies, the Pacific coast, and oh yes all those glacial northern bits.

Parts of Ontario? Southern Ontario, yes, there are some definite similarities with the upper U.S. Midwest (the proliferation of "suburban Mom" haircuts, for one thing). But many parts of Ontario have quite a colonial-British feel to them, though (Kingston; Port Hope; Thousand Islands; Stratford)... other areas aren't Midwestern at all (Niagara wine region area; northern Ontario -- not Midwestern at all; in the eastern part of the province, Ottawa is very debatable due to the Quebec cultural influence, and some small towns are franco-Ontarian).

The Midwest isn't even really homogenous either... the southern Midwest kind of overlaps with the northern edge of the Southern states... thinking of souther Ohio, here.
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Old 03-12-2017, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Toronto, ON
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Canada is a weird case. I would say the people and the culture in Southern Ontario, on the surface are almost indistinguishable to an American, that's a very difficult influence to shake off....until they start having a lengthy conversation with each other...on just about any topic. The difference is more ideological than cultural.
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Old 03-12-2017, 02:29 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
9,139 posts, read 6,351,350 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa2011 View Post
Exactly...The Maritimes aren't Midwestern, nor are Quebec, the Prairies, the Rockies, the Pacific coast, and oh yes all those glacial northern bits.

Parts of Ontario? Southern Ontario, yes, there are some definite similarities with the upper U.S. Midwest (the proliferation of "suburban Mom" haircuts, for one thing). But many parts of Ontario have quite a colonial-British feel to them, though (Kingston; Port Hope; Thousand Islands; Stratford)... other areas aren't Midwestern at all (Niagara wine region area; northern Ontario -- not Midwestern at all; in the eastern part of the province, Ottawa is very debatable due to the Quebec cultural influence, and some small towns are franco-Ontarian).

The Midwest isn't even really homogenous either... the southern Midwest kind of overlaps with the northern edge of the Southern states... thinking of souther Ohio, here.
We all tend to paint a whole country from just what we've seen. How many think France is just Paris?

I've encountered many who have just been to Toronto and believe that is what all of Canada must be like. Heck even The Simpson's creators got the joke, by having mountains as a backdrop to Toronto in one of the episodes where they come to Canada.
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