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Old 03-11-2017, 01:40 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,555 posts, read 14,669,112 times
Reputation: 8605

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greysholic View Post
One of those typical bull**** rankings. It's unbelievable how this kind of crap gets published and people who write them get paid.
Everyone has their own criteria of what is best for them obviously, i've always viewed Germany as one of those perfect places to live in and i'm not going to let a few isolated terror attacks change that.

And i can guarantee you the average American doesn't care about their "global perception" lol
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Old 03-12-2017, 04:09 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
12,683 posts, read 14,958,864 times
Reputation: 8629
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Trains. Living in Japan/Korea, I could get on fast-speed trains....the fastest at the world at that time (although I think much of the world outside of the u.s. has built super fast trains as well). But you'd be on some train in Japan or Korea and see something that says 300kmh/hour..and you knew you'd get from A to B faster than some planes (granted the distances are shorter to cross Korea or Japan). But, meanwhile even in 2017, people in the U.S. think that a high-speed train between even NYC and DC is a strange futuristic thought.
It sounds like a good idea, but I wonder what the fare would be for a high-speed train on the northeast corridor. Already, it's actually cheaper to fly than to take a train in many cases.

Americans like to drive so much, I'm not sure they'd be willing to pay through the roof for a bullet train or the like.
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Old 03-12-2017, 04:49 PM
 
4,337 posts, read 4,451,795 times
Reputation: 3141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ariete View Post
Strong international alliances:

Norway
3.4
Finland
2.1

Ok then. A country not in the EU or Eurozone has more international alliances. It can't be only because of NATO, because Sweden scored even higher than Norway.

Seems the monkey throwing darts and the good old rabbit-in-the-hat methods have been used.
A Norwegian is the Secretary General of NATO. US is also Norway's most important ally. I think that counts for most of the points.
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Old 03-12-2017, 07:31 PM
 
Location: Crappyville,PA
180 posts, read 139,410 times
Reputation: 219
I would agree with Tiger Beer that some Asian countries should be ranked higher. I'm personally surprised the USA cracked the top 20.
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Old 03-12-2017, 08:11 PM
 
5,730 posts, read 3,303,046 times
Reputation: 3418
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
I live in Macau, and previous to Macau, I was living in Japan and South Korea.

I go back to the U.S. sometimes, but I'm ashamed to tell students of how poor the public transportation is - i.e. non-existent throughout most of the U.S., and most Americans are adamantly against it.

I also remember having tiny little cellphones with tons of features in SOuth Korea in the 1990s,and then going back to the U.S. in the 1990s and people were anti-cellphone at that time, or had a huge monster phone for 'roadside security' issues, or had super crazy cellphone plans that financially exploited the hell of people who did get cellphones back at that time. My plan was like $10 unlimited in Korea, and I went back to live in the U.S. for awhile in the 1990s and had some rip-off Sprint plan that tried to get $300 in a month because potential employers called me, when I was trying so hard to not use it at all, because I knew the u.s. system was so exploitative with things like that. But since it was relatively new in the U.S., they wanted to financially exploit the hell out of anyone who did get a cellphone.

I also remember back in the 1990s when throughout the world, the internet was exploding with internet cafes in every niche and cranny. South Korea already had broadband and was known as a gamer capital of the world, and you couldn't WALK for more than 10 minutes without seeing a half dozen internet cafes all within close proximity. Then I'd go back to the U.S., and people were trying some AOL dial-up or some other crazy thing.....then you'd try to find an internet cafe, and someone referred you to some major city with $5/hour, or sometimes even $5/5 minutes internet cafe with coffee or some crazy stuff. But you'd find only one in all of New York City, and it was at Times Square....and good luck to you, unless you knew the Korean neighborhood in New York City, and could read Korean signs, so you could find the $1/hour at ten times the speed.

Trains. Living in Japan/Korea, I could get on fast-speed trains....the fastest at the world at that time (although I think much of the world outside of the u.s. has built super fast trains as well). But you'd be on some train in Japan or Korea and see something that says 300kmh/hour..and you knew you'd get from A to B faster than some planes (granted the distances are shorter to cross Korea or Japan). But, meanwhile even in 2017, people in the U.S. think that a high-speed train between even NYC and DC is a strange futuristic thought.

Ahmm...too many things to mention. Japan builds buildings without noise...they can construct buildings that don't make noise. Fantastic if you live near that.

Just too many things....when I go back to the U.S., I just feel like people are arguing over stupid things all the time...i.e we can't afford trains....Japan cars are better because (I don't even know why).....

I don't know, I just feel like I'm going back 40 years in time, whenever I go back to the States. It also doesn't help that the U.S. has basically only built more of the obsolete shopping malls and suburban tract malls and housing....I go back to where I grew up, and that's the only new things that I see. Whereas when you live in Asia, you just always see entire cities and neighhorhoods change shapes on a regular basis....from great to really great. U.S. cities seems to go to somewhat acceptable to dilipitated or dangerous.

Anyways, my experiences....as an American who has lived in Japan, Korea, and Macau for over 20 years. I'm sure someone who has never left America will strongly argue against me though.
I don't see how Internet cafes would improve anyone's quality of life. They were/are always occupied by boys who skip classes. I for one would never go into one and use their computers.

Trains aren't that special either, it's really just America (plus Canada, Australia) that doesn't have any. America is still a lot better in the working department, which is just a total nightmare in Asia. The rote education as well, it's pretty pathetic.
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Old 03-12-2017, 08:52 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
12,683 posts, read 14,958,864 times
Reputation: 8629
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greysholic View Post
Trains aren't that special either, it's really just America (plus Canada, Australia) that doesn't have any.
It's also subjective to say that a country with a comprehensive rail network is inherently better than a country with a comprehensive highway network. Personal preference - Americans love the freedom of driving. I guess it's a cultural thing.

Having said that, the U.S. does need to upgrade its infrastructure to keep pace with the population growth. Also, because it's getting old. That's where the government comes in.
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Old 03-12-2017, 08:58 PM
 
5,730 posts, read 3,303,046 times
Reputation: 3418
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
It's also subjective to say that a country with a comprehensive rail network is inherently better than a country with a comprehensive highway network. Personal preference - Americans love the freedom of driving. I guess it's a cultural thing.

Having said that, the U.S. does need upgrade its infrastructure to keep pace with the population growth. That's where the government comes in.
All countries with a comprehensive rail network have comprehensive highway network in place as well. It's not like cars don't exist in other countries. My point is that the trains in Asia aren't overly special because Europe has them too.
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Old 03-12-2017, 10:49 PM
 
167 posts, read 52,712 times
Reputation: 452
I love America, but I really think this ranking is awesome.

Hopefully all of the refugees, asylum seekers and future illegals will see it and believe that the U.S. isn't the place to be anymore. I hope we drop further in the rankings next year. #56 sounds about right.
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Old 03-13-2017, 05:42 AM
 
Location: SE UK
5,428 posts, read 4,356,022 times
Reputation: 3633
Seems like the usual poor stereotyping to me.
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Old 03-13-2017, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Macao
14,884 posts, read 30,657,487 times
Reputation: 8427
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
It sounds like a good idea, but I wonder what the fare would be for a high-speed train on the northeast corridor. Already, it's actually cheaper to fly than to take a train in many cases.

Americans like to drive so much, I'm not sure they'd be willing to pay through the roof for a bullet train or the like.
Realistically, because the U.S. doesn't have decent infrastructure in place for public transportation, a high-speed train on the northeast corridor is almost useless.

It would have to involve massive parking lots outside each city....and even then, the logistics would just be messy.

I think there is a love for the car (to a certain degree), but I don't think there is any love whatsover for wall-to-wall traffic jams and 2-hour commutes....and I think some stats say that will double in each consecutive decade.

The U.S. will have to address that in some decade, but seems completely uninterested to even consider it at this time.

Last edited by Tiger Beer; 03-13-2017 at 09:46 AM..
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