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Old 06-18-2017, 10:37 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thepastpresentandfuture View Post
Single cause of Kazakhstan’s extreme desolation in the Caspian Sea land territory is originally sourcing out connections to Russia USSR Soviet Union. Cross the border out of Kazakhstan into Russia tons of these communities are flourishing right by the limit of 500,000 to one million individuals each encompassing the Volga River especially. Astrakhan, Volgograd, Saratov, Samara, Ulyanovsk, Kazan, Nizhny Novgorod, Yaroslavl. Who knew for a Russian cradle of civilization!? Up to 11 out of 20 mega Russia’s major cities relevant to population count are huddling the Volga River watershed biological ecosystem. Closely adjacent to the Caspian Sea of Kazakhstan not that far out. Astonishing even more variety of major separate cities than what is surrounding Moscow or Saint Petersburg when you see a map viewing Saratov virtual compass every direction. Diverting focus away from developing what could have been far more superior realistic potential at the vicinity of Atyrau, Aktau mystical sea grasp.
Dude, there is nothing there, just as there is nothing in western Kansas. You are comparing an area, Volograd to Astana, which Volograd is hundreds of years older and has been under the jurisdiction of Moscow for hundreds of years, versus Astana in which the Russians were not even in the area until the mid 1700's.

The USSR dumped billions into central Asia, to the point the place was a serious drain on the USSR; they could never pull that place economically no matter what they did. When the USSR fell apart, it was the central Asian states that wanted to partner with Russia for a new union, in which Russia said a polite "no" due to the severe financial strain they placed on the USSR.

I guess I should be complaining why NYC is a powerhouse while Bismark, ND is not?
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Old 06-19-2017, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
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A better analogy would be, why doesn't Lake Superior have a megalopolis? Whereas Lake Michigan does (Chicago), the answer: it's freaking cold up there. Similarly eastern Caspian is dry, western Caspian is relatively wet.
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Old 06-20-2017, 04:58 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boxus View Post
The USSR dumped billions into central Asia, to the point the place was a serious drain on the USSR; they could never pull that place economically no matter what they did. When the USSR fell apart, it was the central Asian states that wanted to partner with Russia for a new union, in which Russia said a polite "no" due to the severe financial strain they placed on the USSR.
Quote:
Originally Posted by grega94 View Post
As you can see the eastern Caspian is much drier then the western side, and eastern and northern Kazakhstan are much wetter then the western/interior. Prior to Soviet industrialization, the Russian empire was an agrarian nation, meaning people lived where they could grow crops/herd animals, that was almost impossible to do in the deserts of central Asia. Furthermore the Volga is the largest river in Europe, or course it's going to have a lot of major cities, they also have canals connecting the river to the Baltic sea, white sea and black sea.
Serendipity(Chance by luck) encounters to a reversal of destitution title of status to relative fortunes around Kazakhstan finally separating out of Russia’s own control. Taking up too much space to begin with. Oh, the financial troubles aren’t a matter I am aware of until now. What a mixed ambivalent paradox Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan etc. are actually wanting continuing intricate correspondence back into what they have to avoid, at least occasionally.

Baku Azerbaijan is a total alien compared to the annual year richness of Sochi Russia Krasnador, or Batumi Adjara Kartvelian Georgia. They are all the Western Caspian. Civilization requires every type of variety.

Such negative fatal cynicism when focusing on the Kazakh Caspian Sea. They have their own virtual ocean, and able to reach a full potential of touristic capitalization.
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Old 06-23-2017, 12:35 AM
 
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Would anyone really go at Kazakhstan’s Caspian Sea right now? Without joking, are there enough main incentives already? Simply unacceptable that there no excuses with the reasons of why the vast 500 miles+ of ocean hasn’t ever reached it’s own full potential yet after all of these historical centuries near the famous trading routes.
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Old 06-24-2017, 01:03 AM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
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Also keep in mind that the Caspian sea fluctuates a lot in water level and it wouldn't be wise to build a "megalopolis" right on the shore in the north where the land is very flat, unlike in Azerbaijan coast where it is very hilly so a city such as Baku can still be right on the shore and not face the threat of rising water level. In 1300 the sea level was estimated at -19m, in 1837 it was at -25.5m, in 1977 it was -29m and since the 90s it has fluctuated between -27m and -26.5m. Between 1837 and today the Caspian has fluctuated by 3.5m (11.5ft) and if the historical estimates are correct than the water has fluctuated by 10m (32.8 ft)! that would mean that in medieval times that Astrakhan at -22m would've been under water! (it was founded in 1558) and in the 1700s it would've been right at the shore or near by (which coincides with it's city status in 1717). This is also supported by the fact that in 1800 the Volga delta had an area of 3,222*km² and today it has expanded to a whopping 27,224*km².
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volga_Delta


https://www.cairn.info/loadimg.php?F...0145_img-1.png


https://www.researchgate.net/profile...ty-station.png

This probably helps explain why Iran's cities are all inland, probably because at one time they were either at the shore, or not far from it. And again as I stated earlier Baku is a hilly city which is why it was always at the shore, many parts of the city are even above sea level, so even if a breach was created and the Caspian flooded by the ocean, many parts of the city would survive.
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Old 06-24-2017, 03:15 PM
 
5,762 posts, read 9,496,432 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grega94 View Post
Also keep in mind that the Caspian sea fluctuates a lot in water level and it wouldn't be wise to build a "megalopolis" right on the shore in the north where the land is very flat, unlike in Azerbaijan coast where it is very hilly so a city such as Baku can still be right on the shore and not face the threat of rising water level. In 1300 the sea level was estimated at -19m, in 1837 it was at -25.5m, in 1977 it was -29m and since the 90s it has fluctuated between -27m and -26.5m. Between 1837 and today the Caspian has fluctuated by 3.5m (11.5ft) and if the historical estimates are correct than the water has fluctuated by 10m (32.8 ft)! that would mean that in medieval times that Astrakhan at -22m would've been under water! (it was founded in 1558) and in the 1700s it would've been right at the shore or near by (which coincides with it's city status in 1717). This is also supported by the fact that in 1800 the Volga delta had an area of 3,222*km² and today it has expanded to a whopping 27,224*km².
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volga_Delta

https://www.cairn.info/loadimg.php?F...0145_img-1.png


https://www.researchgate.net/profile...ty-station.png

This probably helps explain why Iran's cities are all inland, probably because at one time they were either at the shore, or not far from it. And again as I stated earlier Baku is a hilly city which is why it was always at the shore, many parts of the city are even above sea level, so even if a breach was created and the Caspian flooded by the ocean, many parts of the city would survive.
Deciphering up to four main original reasons surrounding the exact controversy of Kazakhstan’s extremely severe avoidance on affirmative maximum potential.

I. Ancient cradle of Russian civilization in such close proximity to take all of these people away by the millions

II. Volga River Discharge

III. Kazakh Caspian Sea geography

IV. Significant inclinations of ethnic Kazakh people migrating into the far east at the opposite side of the republic at least one thousand miles away.

Science evaluation of Caspian Sea is displaying another reality compared to the Black Sea or the Mediterranean. A major oddity very strange situation the Aral Sea is the entire polar opposite of Caspian Sea’s increase of ocean resembling volume. I am sure you know of the ecological dilemma over there.
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Old 06-24-2017, 04:10 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
2,643 posts, read 1,091,404 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thepastpresentandfuture View Post
Deciphering up to four main original reasons surrounding the exact controversy of Kazakhstan’s extremely severe avoidance on affirmative maximum potential.

I. Ancient cradle of Russian civilization in such close proximity to take all of these people away by the millions

II. Volga River Discharge

III. Kazakh Caspian Sea geography

IV. Significant inclinations of ethnic Kazakh people migrating into the far east at the opposite side of the republic at least one thousand miles away.

Science evaluation of Caspian Sea is displaying another reality compared to the Black Sea or the Mediterranean. A major oddity very strange situation the Aral Sea is the entire polar opposite of Caspian Sea’s increase of ocean resembling volume. I am sure you know of the ecological dilemma over there.
The Aral Sea is loosing water because most of it is being diverted for agricultural, and the crops they are growing are mainly water thirsty cotton and many of the canals are just ditches in the ground so a lot of water is wasted, Uzbekistan is too poor to fix these issues and is to reliant on the cotton cash crop to switch over to something more drought tolerant. Kazakhstan however has dammed the northern part of the lake and the north Aral Sea has started in creasing in volume. The Caspian Sea also lost a lot of water in 70s due to large dams built by the soviets, there was then a movement to save it, which they did by damming the Garabogazköl lagoon which had an extremely high evaporation rate, when that happened water levels spiked in the Caspian and the lagoon dried out, However it was also bad since the salts that became exposed strated to be blown around and created an ecological disaster similar to the Aral Sea. So in 1992 it was breached and water filled the Lagoon once more, which you can see the effects in the graph I provided earlier.
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Old 07-24-2017, 10:15 PM
 
5,762 posts, read 9,496,432 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grega94 View Post
The Aral Sea is loosing water because most of it is being diverted for agricultural, and the crops they are growing are mainly water thirsty cotton and many of the canals are just ditches in the ground so a lot of water is wasted, Uzbekistan is too poor to fix these issues and is to reliant on the cotton cash crop to switch over to something more drought tolerant. Kazakhstan however has dammed the northern part of the lake and the north Aral Sea has started in creasing in volume. The Caspian Sea also lost a lot of water in 70s due to large dams built by the soviets, there was then a movement to save it, which they did by damming the Garabogazköl lagoon which had an extremely high evaporation rate, when that happened water levels spiked in the Caspian and the lagoon dried out, However it was also bad since the salts that became exposed strated to be blown around and created an ecological disaster similar to the Aral Sea. So in 1992 it was breached and water filled the Lagoon once more, which you can see the effects in the graph I provided earlier.
Sophistication of engineering science knowledge to the entire ground is absolutely essential. Ironic Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan are the polar opposite with these methods. Successful(Kazakhstan) versus Failure(Uzbekistan) on any matters of the Aral Sea. Is Kazakhstan able to develop a sea resort over there at this point? There is technical past modifying of adaptations around the Caspian natural geography sea barriers after all. Despite anything, Russia USSR Soviet Union went deep into dramatically affecting how Kazakhstan’s urbanity scale ended up.
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Old 07-25-2017, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
2,643 posts, read 1,091,404 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thepastpresentandfuture View Post
Sophistication of engineering science knowledge to the entire ground is absolutely essential. Ironic Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan are the polar opposite with these methods. Successful(Kazakhstan) versus Failure(Uzbekistan) on any matters of the Aral Sea. Is Kazakhstan able to develop a sea resort over there at this point? There is technical past modifying of adaptations around the Caspian natural geography sea barriers after all. Despite anything, Russia USSR Soviet Union went deep into dramatically affecting how Kazakhstan’s urbanity scale ended up.
The north Aral sea has not fully recovered, and the largest city in the area is Aralsk, but the city was never large, and never catered to tourists, it was a major fishing port, but it is sadly still land locked, but hopefully the sea will rise high enough reach this depressed town once again. However a famous saline lake that has a lot of tourists, particularly back in soviet times is Issyk-Kul the second largest saline lake in the world, it is located up in the mountains in Kyrgyzstan. It's also not far away from Kazakhstan's largest city Almaty.
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Old 07-26-2017, 12:36 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
2,643 posts, read 1,091,404 times
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I think you might find this news article interesting
https://www.azernews.az/travel/116228.html
Kazakh TV - Sea cruises on the Caspian Sea may open in the coming years

in the article it says that Russia and other Caspian countries are going to develop cruise tourism on the Caspian sea. There have been talks about such a project since 2005.

The route will include these cities Makhachkala-Derbent-Baku-Enzeli-Turkmenbashi-Aktau-Astrakhan-Makhachkala.
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