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Old 07-28-2017, 03:51 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe90 View Post
That applies to both Australia and NZ.



Europe and North America are bigger players than China (or Asia), in terms of overseas investment. NZ still has relatively low levels of foreign investment, on a global scale, despite it's economic/political stability and the relative ease of doing business here.

Property is expensive in NZ due to lack of a capital gains tax, land banking, excessive building regulation, and immigration. Chinese property investors are still dwarfed by NZers, with multiple properties.

NZ was comparatively wealthier before the era of increased foreign investment.
new zealand is a successful country economically considering how isolated it is but it might be fair to say it hasnt grown that much wealthier this past thirty years relative to many other western nations , up until the beginning of the nineties , new zealand was a wealthier country than ireland , fifty years ago , it was far wealthier with an economy three times larger , today irelands economy is about 50% larger than that of new zealand , now granted ireland was very poor back then but places like south korea were also no wealthier than ireland back in the mid sixties , i suppose its mostly down to isolation geographically , australia is also isolated but a huge natural resource producer with a massive customer in china

interesting about land banking , you mean hoarding of land which could be used to development i presume ?

that is a major problem in dublin and has been for decades , suffice to say those who own the land hold quite a bit of sway with politicians
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Old 07-28-2017, 04:00 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by euro123 View Post
* Nigeria is oil rich, 50% Muslim, yet far poorer than UAE or Quatar, Kuwait;
* Monaco compared to neighboring Genoa, not that Genoa is poor but the big contrast...;
* Russia, given their natual resources and the fact that they were never ruled by someone else for long periods of time;
* Greece should be richer too.
Greece is as rich as they can be. They did a mistake managing their money and they lived way beyond their means for more than a decade.
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Old 07-28-2017, 05:03 PM
 
638 posts, read 356,366 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe90 View Post
That applies to both Australia and NZ.
Australia's trade was always more diverse though, even in the 1800s. To an extent it was simply because of its broader range of exports. Industries like gold and pearling back in the 1800s sold to global markets. In the pre WWII era Australia was a suppler of iron ore products to Japan, which became highly controversial in the late 1930s and earned a senior politician of the day the nickname of "pig iron Bob".
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Old 07-28-2017, 08:06 PM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
9,775 posts, read 5,717,235 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe90 View Post
Only as a market, although you guys have the trade surplus. Kiwi migration to Australia hurts NZ.
Sadly for NZ, this is becoming rather common.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Warszawa View Post
Morocco - One of the most historically and culturally rich parts of Africa in a close proximity to Western Europe. Sadly its GDP per capita is in the lower half of the world.
Good call. I would also squeeze in Egypt because of its rich history and modern tourism.

What about Tunisia and Algeria?
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Old 07-28-2017, 09:13 PM
 
3,990 posts, read 4,892,183 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irish_bob View Post
iran is again stymied by america , its a much more modern country than saudi arabia on every level in terms of culture , israel has far and away the richest diaspora of any nation on earth , of course its going to be wealthy , it is also the number one ally of the most powerful nation on earth ( which is of course due to its diaspora being so wealthy and powerful )
Iran also has been for a long time mistrusted by the Arab states, due to the Sunni and Shia frictions. It also has a embargo with certain Arab countries, especially Saudi Arabia. It somewhat like the Catholics vs Protestants issue in the past in Europe.

Well not all Jews are wealthy. I know Jews on welfare, and even the ones that are not, they don't seem wealthy for my country standards. Yet of course there are very wealthy Jews, but they only represent a small minority of Jews. Plus Israel GDP per cap is not as high as some Western European countries and the USA.

Last edited by other99; 07-28-2017 at 09:24 PM..
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Old 07-28-2017, 09:24 PM
 
Location: Top of the South (Motueka), NZ
14,502 posts, read 10,541,059 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakery Hill View Post
Australia's trade was always more diverse though, even in the 1800s. To an extent it was simply because of its broader range of exports. Industries like gold and pearling back in the 1800s sold to global markets. In the pre WWII era Australia was a suppler of iron ore products to Japan, which became highly controversial in the late 1930s and earned a senior politician of the day the nickname of "pig iron Bob".
Similar to NZ, where Gold, whaling and timber to the America, were key to early economic development

Quote:
Originally Posted by irish_bob View Post
new zealand is a successful country economically considering how isolated it is but it might be fair to say it hasnt grown that much wealthier this past thirty years relative to many other western nations , up until the beginning of the nineties , new zealand was a wealthier country than ireland , fifty years ago , it was far wealthier with an economy three times larger , today irelands economy is about 50% larger than that of new zealand , now granted ireland was very poor back then but places like south korea were also no wealthier than ireland back in the mid sixties , i suppose its mostly down to isolation geographically , australia is also isolated but a huge natural resource producer with a massive customer in china

interesting about land banking , you mean hoarding of land which could be used to development i presume ?

that is a major problem in dublin and has been for decades , suffice to say those who own the land hold quite a bit of sway with politicians
Very fair to say that. Giving large tax breaks for multinationals setting up shop here, hasn't been viewed as a wise move by successive governments, as other factors would cancel those advantages. The relatively recent growth of the film industry was a rare exception, but that now seems to be more of a blackmail situation, with threats of withdrawal, without changes in labour laws and tax breaks.

Ireland would have probably been the recipient of EU money as well -no sugar daddy for NZ, although Ireland has made it's own success as well.

Land banking in NZ isn't really a matter of landowners having sway with the government, as much as there being no disincentive against it - I don't think government forcing property owners to utilise their assets for "national good" would sit well with NZers. It has slowed the growth of housing construction though, as landowners/developers seek maximum profit from smaller numbers of sections on offer. No sections in town here for under $240,000 at the moment -put a $250,000 (basic) house on it, and there are no new houses under half a million

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethereal View Post
Sadly for NZ, this is becoming rather common.
It's actually becoming less common. Kiwi migration peaked some years ago. The rate of migration has slowed, and there has been an increasing number returning home, which is not surprising as Kiwis get less favourable treatment in Australia, than Aussies do here.
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Old 07-28-2017, 09:48 PM
 
3,990 posts, read 4,892,183 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joacocanal View Post
wat, nope. there isn't any kind of US "embargo" on Venezuela. it's all their own government's fault.



Slovakia is pretty average for European standars, afaik: http://i.imgur.com/K5XNe7j.jpg




not really.

Uruguay gdp per capita nominal is twice the Latin American average, in PPP is like 70% higher than LatAm average.

Many political subdivisions of several Latin American countries are as wealthy or wealthier than Uruguay, having a similar or a bigger population. Santander department in Colombia, for example.

Uruguay is actually wealthier than Chile on nominal terms. it also has lower poverty rates.
Slovakia economy is not as advanced and it still lacks development for Western European standards:

However, the average Slovak gross wage remains low by European standards at 861 euros ($941.59) per month, less than its regional peers. That appeals to investors, but not to voters.

Slovak teachers, some of whom went on strike last month, are paid less than those in any other country in the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, according to OECD data. And at 10.4 percent the unemployment rate is far above the Czech Republic's 6.4 percent. A third of the labour force is out of work is some outlying regions.
Slovakia's economy stands out, but its public services lag behind | Reuters


Chile has less debt than Uruguay. It has a trade surplus.
Chile has a trade surplus approaching $5bn, has the highest GDP per capita of any South American country at over $23,000 (IMF, 2016 at purchasing power parity) and has a national debt to GDP of 21.3% (2016), far below neighbours such as Brazil (67%).http://themarketmogul.com/investing-...e/?hvid=4GCUcm
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Old 07-28-2017, 11:09 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anhityk View Post
However, Slovenes are not Germanics although they are, I suppose, heavily influenced by Austria, that is Germans and Germanics.
Speaking of Slovenia it is a bit weird that it is wealthy but in the meantime, Macedonia, Bosnia and Serbia what were members of the same and not so very big country of Yugoslavia, are relatively poor. (ok, Serbia and Bosnia were in war- because of that). The problem of Macedonia might be the of course lack of wealthy neighbours but I still wonder why is that gap relatively big.
I believe that Slovenia is part of the E.U, while the other three are not.
Overall, with all post-Soviet block countries, watch for such signs as who is in EU who is not, and which of the wealthy EU countries are willing to invest in any of those (former Soviet satellite countries) and how much. This is what usually determines their wealth/poverty level.
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Old 07-29-2017, 07:08 AM
 
6,219 posts, read 6,650,099 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakery Hill View Post
Australia's trade was always more diverse though, even in the 1800s. To an extent it was simply because of its broader range of exports. Industries like gold and pearling back in the 1800s sold to global markets. In the pre WWII era Australia was a suppler of iron ore products to Japan, which became highly controversial in the late 1930s and earned a senior politician of the day the nickname of "pig iron Bob".
australia is actually not a very diversified economy relative to its GDP , much less so than the uk , germany or the netherlands , bar rio tinto and BHP biliton ( which are half british ) , can anyone name a major australian corporation ? , it relies very heavily on commodities , happily due to the stunning rise of china , there has been an insatiable demand
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Old 07-29-2017, 07:12 AM
 
6,219 posts, read 6,650,099 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by other99 View Post
Iran also has been for a long time mistrusted by the Arab states, due to the Sunni and Shia frictions. It also has a embargo with certain Arab countries, especially Saudi Arabia. It somewhat like the Catholics vs Protestants issue in the past in Europe.

Well not all Jews are wealthy. I know Jews on welfare, and even the ones that are not, they don't seem wealthy for my country standards. Yet of course there are very wealthy Jews, but they only represent a small minority of Jews. Plus Israel GDP per cap is not as high as some Western European countries and the USA.
on its own merits , israel has no reason to be wealthy , no country receives more in welfare from the usa and of course rich jewish donors

jews are fantastically wealthy relative to the average american ( twice as wealthy on average ), nothing wrong with that , no other ethnic group has been as good at networking and they had good reason to do so in the past , they dominate wall st and the media , two very influential sectors when it comes to influencing politics

Last edited by irish_bob; 07-29-2017 at 07:25 AM..
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