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Old 08-01-2017, 10:16 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
670 posts, read 176,605 times
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What are the most innacessible places on Earth. It doesn't have to be a country or any political division for that matter. Please don't say the ocean depths or the Earth's core as those would fall under inhospitable.

Some of mine are

Ilha de Queimada Grande: Also known as Snake Island. It is completely off limits to the general public and no one lives there. The only trace of human activity is a lighthouse built in the early 20th century.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ilha_da_Queimada_Grande

North Sentinel Island: An island inhabited by the Sentinelese who are an indigenous tribe that reject contact with the outside world.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Sentinel_Island

Bouvet Island: Located in the Atlantic, it is considered the most remote island in the world

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bouvet_Island#

Chernobyl Exclusion Zone: The area most affected by the 1986 disaster. I'm actually not sure about this last one as it seems tourism is becoming more and more prominent.
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Old 08-02-2017, 02:44 AM
 
Location: Great Britain
5,027 posts, read 1,545,344 times
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Some Men in black get very touchy when you go near Area 51 in the US.

I told them, all I want to do is have a picnic and a nice bottle of dry white wine, I even offered them a sandwich, a pork pie and a scotch egg and they still refused, I guess you can't please some people.
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Old 08-02-2017, 05:02 AM
 
Location: Turku, Finland
23,727 posts, read 15,064,663 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Milky Way Resident View Post
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone: The area most affected by the 1986 disaster. I'm actually not sure about this last one as it seems tourism is becoming more and more prominent.
Yeah. It's not hard at all to go sightseeing in the Exclusion Zone.

The South Pole is quite hard to reach.

Wrangel Island is almost impossible to reach.
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Old 08-02-2017, 06:55 AM
Yac
 
5,515 posts, read 5,771,293 times
Several friends were to Chernobyl, it takes some effort to get in but it's not a problem in general.
I've always found the multiple Russian closed cities fascinating, I hope I'll get to visit one some day. Quoting wikipedia:
Quote:
There are currently 44 publicly acknowledged closed cities in Russia with a total population of about 1.5 million people. 75% are administered by the Russian Ministry of Defense, with the rest being administered by Rosatom.[4] Another 15 or so closed cities are believed to exist, but their names and locations have not been publicly disclosed by the Russian government.[5]
Another place that was inaccessible until about 8 years ago is the Hashima island, also known as battleship island, an abandoned coal mine and city on a Japanese island. There are limited tours there.
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Old 08-02-2017, 08:12 AM
 
5,545 posts, read 4,751,105 times
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Saint Helena, Ascension, and Tristan da Cunha.
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Old 08-02-2017, 08:13 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
670 posts, read 176,605 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ariete View Post
Yeah. It's not hard at all to go sightseeing in the Exclusion Zone.

The South Pole is quite hard to reach.

Wrangel Island is almost impossible to reach.
That's the conclusion i came to regarding the Exclusion Zone after further research.

I agree with the other two. There are tours of Antarctica, but none of them are likely to go all the way to the South Pole.
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Old 08-02-2017, 09:13 AM
 
Location: São Paulo, Brazil
1,407 posts, read 1,413,041 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Milky Way Resident View Post
Ilha de Queimada Grande: Also known as Snake Island. It is completely off limits to the general public and no one lives there. The only trace of human activity is a lighthouse built in the early 20th century.
This island is famous here.
It's located near the coastal town of Peruíbe, about 200km far of SP. A cousin of my mother owns a house in this town, and he spoke a lot about this place. That island has venomous snakes everywhere. If you walk there, it's almost sure that you will die. The brazilian navy now forbids arrival on this island.
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Old 08-02-2017, 10:16 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
670 posts, read 176,605 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fabio SBA View Post
This island is famous here.
It's located near the coastal town of Peruíbe, about 200km far of SP. A cousin of my mother owns a house in this town, and he spoke a lot about this place. That island has venomous snakes everywhere. If you walk there, it's almost sure that you will die. The brazilian navy now forbids arrival on this island.
I always found it interesting that humans never managed to establish a major foothold there. is it because it is not interesting enough or do they just want to protect the native snake population?
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Old 08-02-2017, 10:24 AM
 
Location: East Mt Airy, Philadelphia
809 posts, read 774,380 times
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Default Pitcairn Island

Pitcairn Island, home of the descendants of the Bounty mutineers. Not only way out of the way (that was the whole point when the Bounty crew settled there, to be almost literally off the map), but also because of the hoops you have to jump through if you had the means with which to visit. You don't just lash your yacht to a mooring in Adamstown and say "I'm here to visit." It's quite a process, and that heightens its inaccessibility.
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Old 08-02-2017, 11:31 AM
 
Location: São Paulo, Brazil
1,407 posts, read 1,413,041 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Milky Way Resident View Post
I always found it interesting that humans never managed to establish a major foothold there. is it because it is not interesting enough or do they just want to protect the native snake population?
Yes, there is a law protecting the snakes, but the largest problem is that the snakes will kill everyone trying to go there.
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