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Old 09-10-2017, 09:16 AM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by farinello View Post
Gentoo

Even in Miami, in which Spanish is dominating from an ecomical, social and political standpoint, you still need good English to bag a good, professional job. You also need good Spanish, not Spanglish...a current issue nowdays. Other languages are also a plus, Portuguese, French, etc.

So there's a constant protest by English-only speakers because large corporations ask Spanish even if not strictly necessary.

In that respect, Miami looks like Europe by the fact that language skills are necessary for many jobs, not just for working as a bagger at Sedano, a Cuban supermarket.

The quality of Spanish has improved dramatically at least in the media, more access to Latin American and Spanish content. Spanish TV being extremely popular and diario El País from Spain is also very popular. El Nuevo Herald, the Spanish version of New Herald, is the only Spanish paper written in very good Spanish in the US.
I cannot speak for Miami which is why I specified California. This protest you speak of simply doesn't happen here. Sure some people are frustrated by it but it stands as is. Florida's culture is very different from California's. The latter has a much longer history of Spanish speakers being present and indeed was part of not just Spain but Mexico too for a short time. There have always been a lot more Spanish speakers in California indeed, San Diego and Tijuana are essentially the same metro as many people live in TJ and work in San Diego. Even in Northern California, many people visit family in Mexico.

Newspapers in California include "El Mexicano", El Latino" and about one or two others whose names I cannot remember. For TV, the American owned Univision and Telemundo are standard. Many cable and satellite providers offer Spanish language packages and a couple of Mexican networks are available.
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Old 09-10-2017, 09:19 AM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jorge ChemE View Post
Most "spanish" population in the US come from Mexico, right? Just curious, I am not sure if there are quite a lot spaniards in the US since those prefer UK and Germany rather than US (and also because is terribly hard to go there being spaniard) but there may be significant spanish from Spain population in Florida, but not in California. Anyway, I guess most mexican population concentrates in California and Florida. Back to the topic, even being spaniard I may admit that there may be more mexicans speaking in english because of emigration to the US and also because most qualified jobs in Mexico demands to be bilingual (spanish + english) and even holding a US visa, something that usually doesn't happen in Spain.
Yes, the majority of Spanish speakers in the US are of Mexican origin and heritage. Mexicans are concentrated mainly in the western states with California and Texas having the largest share. Certain cities like Chicago also have sizable populations. In Florida, Spanish speakers are predominantly Cuban and in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic, they are usually Puerto Rican. Never confuse one of these groups with another LOL
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Old 09-11-2017, 05:34 AM
 
305 posts, read 59,481 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
I cannot speak for Miami which is why I specified California. This protest you speak of simply doesn't happen here. Sure some people are frustrated by it but it stands as is. Florida's culture is very different from California's. The latter has a much longer history of Spanish speakers being present and indeed was part of not just Spain but Mexico too for a short time. There have always been a lot more Spanish speakers in California indeed, San Diego and Tijuana are essentially the same metro as many people live in TJ and work in San Diego. Even in Northern California, many people visit family in Mexico.

Newspapers in California include "El Mexicano", El Latino" and about one or two others whose names I cannot remember. For TV, the American owned Univision and Telemundo are standard. Many cable and satellite providers offer Spanish language packages and a couple of Mexican networks are available.
Florida has the oldest city in the continent, San Agustín, and large Spanish speaking areas such as Ibor City in Tampa and Cayo Hueso during the last 180 years. But ancient and Spanish presence in Florida is more related to Canarians and Minorcans and Spanish going back and forth Cuba, as Florida was part of the Captainancy of Havana until 1826, I believe. San Agustin is still peopled by descendants of Minorcans brought by English.

Florida was also invaded, as California -back then Mexico.

Spanish presence is older than Mexico, as Florida was discovered in 1513 by Ponce de León than landed in Cabo Cañaveral.

Ponce de Leon found an Indian in nowdays Fort Myers that spoke Spanish, which is still a mistery, in his way back to Havana he stopped at Chequesta, nowdays Miami.

Last edited by farinello; 09-11-2017 at 06:02 AM..
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Old 09-11-2017, 08:57 AM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
15,846 posts, read 19,837,049 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by farinello View Post
Florida has the oldest city in the continent, San Agustín, and large Spanish speaking areas such as Ibor City in Tampa and Cayo Hueso during the last 180 years. But ancient and Spanish presence in Florida is more related to Canarians and Minorcans and Spanish going back and forth Cuba, as Florida was part of the Captainancy of Havana until 1826, I believe. San Agustin is still peopled by descendants of Minorcans brought by English.

Florida was also invaded, as California -back then Mexico.

Spanish presence is older than Mexico, as Florida was discovered in 1513 by Ponce de León than landed in Cabo Cañaveral.

Ponce de Leon found an Indian in nowdays Fort Myers that spoke Spanish, which is still a mistery, in his way back to Havana he stopped at Chequesta, nowdays Miami.
I knew St. Augustine was the oldest American city so that was a brain fart on my part. I don't know much else about Florida so thanks for the info.

California seceded from Mexico before it was invaded and was a sovereign nation for about a month.
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Old 09-11-2017, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Kansas/China
3,597 posts, read 1,651,384 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
I knew St. Augustine was the oldest American city so that was a brain fart on my part. I don't know much else about Florida so thanks for the info.

California seceded from Mexico before it was invaded and was a sovereign nation for about a month.
Spain colonized Florida first and then California, but the number of Spanish speaking immigrants was never as high to Florida and English speaking immigrants greatly exceeded Spanish speaking immigrants. Only in Miami and a few suburbs is Spainish dominate. Get out of Miami and the number of Spanish speakers drops very rapidly.

In California you have to get clear to the north part of the state before one sees a real decline in Spanish. There are rural areas all over south and even central California where Spanish mostly dominates.

Miami is strange in that way since Spanish is very dominating, but really once you get out of the city, even to Fort Lauderdale, Spanish is spoken by a lot less of the population. Spanish isn't spoken very much in the Keys or the gulf coast of Florida either.

I couldn't find any language data, but Hispanics only make up 5% of Saint Augustines population and I'd guess the number of Spanish speakers is under 5%.
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Old 09-11-2017, 10:44 AM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
15,846 posts, read 19,837,049 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattks View Post

In California you have to get clear to the north part of the state before one sees a real decline in Spanish. There are rural areas all over south and even central California where Spanish mostly dominates.
^^^This. I don't think a lot of people realize this. This ties back into why Many in Mexico don't speak English as well as many think they would. In many situations, they simply don't need to to communicate across the border.
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Old 09-11-2017, 03:13 PM
 
2 posts, read 488 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EduardoFinatto View Post
Kinda surprising... Their are so many of them that speak pretty good and fluent english...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
Nethernlands 90%! Just five percent behind the UK.
That always surprise most ppl. Really wonder why too many Dutch speak fluent English.
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Old 09-14-2017, 04:13 AM
 
305 posts, read 59,481 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattks View Post
Spain colonized Florida first and then California, but the number of Spanish speaking immigrants was never as high to Florida and English speaking immigrants greatly exceeded Spanish speaking immigrants. Only in Miami and a few suburbs is Spainish dominate. Get out of Miami and the number of Spanish speakers drops very rapidly.

In California you have to get clear to the north part of the state before one sees a real decline in Spanish. There are rural areas all over south and even central California where Spanish mostly dominates.

Miami is strange in that way since Spanish is very dominating, but really once you get out of the city, even to Fort Lauderdale, Spanish is spoken by a lot less of the population. Spanish isn't spoken very much in the Keys or the gulf coast of Florida either.

I couldn't find any language data, but Hispanics only make up 5% of Saint Augustines population and I'd guess the number of Spanish speakers is under 5%.
Tampa was the city with most of Spanish speakers when Miami did not exist, so was Cayo Hueso. A large part of Saint Augustine in inhabited by descendants of Minorcans that adopted Spanish, but after 230 years they might have forgotten Spanish and adopted the local dialect, after all they are southeners and supported the confederacy.

Cayo Hueso was mostly Spanish speaking since inception, but after the invasion received many English speaking immigrants.

Now Tampa and Orlando have very large Spanish speaking populations.
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