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Old 09-24-2017, 07:14 PM
 
Location: Turku, Finland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
American and British music is built on Western music theory. Europe, particularly most of Western Europe is the heart and birthplace of western music theory, particularly Germany and Italy. This spread to most neighboring countries so the music in these countries didn't sound a whole lot different to begin with minus having their own regional flavor. In the US, African rhythms became part of the music using western theory. Because American music was already quite similar to British, German and Italian music in general, it didn't take much for it to spread back and for the rhythms created in the US to become a standard part of the construction of the musical sound.

This music theory is the foundation of the music and everything else is worked in to fit it.
Exactly. American and British music IS European music. And as we share the same cultural sphere (unlike some other places like Africa), it's only natural that the music is similar.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MalaMan View Post
Countries like Germany and Italy have their own national folkloric rhythms, but those native rhythms are almost forgotten in popular "radio music" produced in the last decade in those countries.
The traditional folk music in Europe is based on the same principles as rock music. And if you listen to folk music anywhere from the Catholic/Protestant sphere it sound strikingly similar. And not every country have a certain distinct style. Secondly, who on earth would want to listen to a radio channel full of yodeling?
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Old 09-24-2017, 07:20 PM
 
Location: Fortaleza, Brazil
2,366 posts, read 3,935,736 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Milky Way Resident View Post
I think the reason why pop, rap, reggaeton, rock are popular is because many of them use song structures that bode well for easy listening, with the catchy choruses popping up everywhere.

Even within the rock canon, certain subgenres like alternative, hard or grunge are more popular then progressive which tends to rely on unconventional song structures, not to mention the fact that songs tend to be longer.
The cultural preponderance of the USA and UK in the world may have something to do with it...

Only in some parts of the world the mass music industry resisted to be assimilated by American/British genres (and Jamaican).

In Bulgaria, for example, they still make "mass music" with a local rhythm.

Look at this Bulgarian song released on June 2017 (with more than 4 million views on YouTube):



You can notice it doesn't sound like rap, R&B, American pop, it has a local Bulgarian rhythm.
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Old 09-24-2017, 07:27 PM
 
Location: Fortaleza, Brazil
2,366 posts, read 3,935,736 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ariete View Post
The traditional folk music in Europe is based on the same principles as rock music. And if you listen to folk music anywhere from the Catholic/Protestant sphere it sound strikingly similar. And not every country have a certain distinct style. Secondly, who on earth would want to listen to a radio channel full of yodeling?

Here is some traditional folk music from Germany that doesn't sound like any American/Jamaican/British genre:



But the "pop music" produced these days in Germany is nothing like that.

Today's German pop music sounds like American/British music.
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Old 09-24-2017, 07:43 PM
 
Location: Fortaleza, Brazil
2,366 posts, read 3,935,736 times
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Here is an example of Brazilian music that is popular in the country these days (released on September 11, more than 21 million views):



Like it or hate it, the fact is that it doesn't sound nothing like any American/British genre.
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Old 09-24-2017, 08:30 PM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
15,818 posts, read 19,516,868 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MalaMan View Post
Countries like Germany and Italy have their own national folkloric rhythms,
Which is still built on western music theory. Those are the two countries most important in the development of western theory. The theory itself was formulated predominantly by German composers. Most of the musical terms are Italian. The vowels used in vocal training are Italian vowels. I mentioned that they have their own local flavor but it is still the same theory even though you may not be able to hear it. This is the reason many modern songs can sample traditional folk songs. Compare with music from the Middle East or Far East and it is quite different because their traditional music is not based on western music theory.
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Old 09-24-2017, 08:35 PM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
15,818 posts, read 19,516,868 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Milky Way Resident View Post
I think the reason why pop, rap, reggaeton, rock are popular is because many of them use song structures that bode well for easy listening, with the catchy choruses popping up everywhere.

Even within the rock canon, certain subgenres like alternative, hard or grunge are more popular then progressive which tends to rely on unconventional song structures, not to mention the fact that songs tend to be longer.
^^^This. Songs that most people find "catchy" tend to have repetitive riffs and hooks and are easy to sing to and/or dance to.
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Old 09-24-2017, 09:05 PM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MalaMan View Post
Here is some traditional folk music from Germany that doesn't sound like any American/Jamaican/British genre:



But the "pop music" produced these days in Germany is nothing like that.

Today's German pop music sounds like American/British music.
It's using western music theory still. This songs time signature is in a 2/4 count which if you slow it down would be a march. The emphasis is on the first note and it's going; ONE two ONE two ONE two. Add two more beats with an emphasis still on the ONE and you get a time signature of 4/4 also known as "common time" because it is the most frequently used time signature; ONE two three four ONE two three four ONE two three four

You are only able to hear the instruments and the melodies but the root of the music is still western theory.

Here is a modern German techno based dance song in typical 4/4 count. At 1:28, they sample a traditional German folk song into it as 2/4 will mix with 4/4. Just for good measure, they added a Jamaican style ragga rap rhyme over the traditional German folk song. Can't do this if the music is built on different music theories.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OJIRdaNUe50
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Old 09-24-2017, 09:12 PM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
15,818 posts, read 19,516,868 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MalaMan View Post
Here is an example of Brazilian music that is popular in the country these days (released on September 11, more than 21 million views):



Like it or hate it, the fact is that it doesn't sound nothing like any American/British genre.
LOL the song begins with a sample of the wedding march. Typical pop/rock with a Latin flavor written in common time and it's in G major.

Typical western music.
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Old 09-24-2017, 09:21 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
2,409 posts, read 982,398 times
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There is a popular Russian band, Otava Yo, that bases there songs from traditional Russian music.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0JQ0xnJyb0A

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0HtvH34CmZY

And as other people pointed out all songs of Europe are inherently similar.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9oK1NGbrMk0
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Old 09-24-2017, 09:26 PM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
15,818 posts, read 19,516,868 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grega94 View Post
There is a popular Russian band, Otava Yo, that bases there songs from traditional Russian music.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0JQ0xnJyb0A

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0HtvH34CmZY

And as other people pointed out all songs of Europe are inherently similar.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9oK1NGbrMk0
I only analyzed the first song because they're all basically the same.

First song is written in 4/4 (common time) and is in G minor (the key of G is one of the more popular). Again, western music theory.
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