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Old 09-22-2017, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Fortaleza, Brazil
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If you check the music that plays in the radio stations around the world, today the "top hits" in each country (not considering foreign hits) you can see that very few countries have popular music that doesn't sound like American/British music.

Even if almost every country produces songs with lyrics in its own languages, the RHYTHM of the most popular songs that play in the radio stations these days sounds like American/British music. In France, in Germany, in Italy, all the popular songs produced in those countries, in their own languages, that play in the radio stations (and are popular on YouTube), are songs that could easily be mistaken by American music, if it wasn't for the language of the lyrics. The same things happens in most countries in the world. K-Pop in South Korea and J-Pop in Japan surely sound like American/British music, if it wasn't for the language of the lyrics.

The exceptions are the countries of Latin America, that have their own rhythms that are "mainstream" inside the country, with a music industry based on those native rhythms, with songs that play in the radio stations and are popular on YouTube.

Brazil, for example, has at least six rhythms these days that are native and have a music industry devoted to them, with many songs that are popular in the whole country, or at least in part of the country. The rhythms are sertanejo, funk carioca, forró, axé, pagode and arrocha.

The Arab world is also an exception, having popular radio music that don't sound American/British.

In Europe I think there are very few countries that have native rhythms with a real music industry and popular songs playing in the radio. Maybe Romania and Serbia.

Of course every country has FOLKLORIC music that is played in traditional festivities, but that's different from everyday "radio music", with a music industry that produces popular songs.
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Old 09-22-2017, 11:38 AM
 
Location: Fortaleza, Brazil
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Well, since Puerto Rico is part of the USA, and reggaeton originated in Puerto Rico, technically speaking reggaeton is "American music".

But let's consider reggaeton as not being American music, for the purposes of this thread.
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Old 09-22-2017, 08:52 PM
 
Location: London, UK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MalaMan View Post
Well, since Puerto Rico is part of the USA, and reggaeton originated in Puerto Rico, technically speaking reggaeton is "American music".

But let's consider reggaeton as not being American music, for the purposes of this thread.
Reggaeton is based on Jamaican music. Not British or American! Jamaica is a powerhouse and is one of the few countries to have influenced the massive British and American sounds/markets.
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Old 09-22-2017, 09:08 PM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
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American and British music is built on Western music theory. Europe, particularly most of Western Europe is the heart and birthplace of western music theory, particularly Germany and Italy. This spread to most neighboring countries so the music in these countries didn't sound a whole lot different to begin with minus having their own regional flavor. In the US, African rhythms became part of the music using western theory. Because American music was already quite similar to British, German and Italian music in general, it didn't take much for it to spread back and for the rhythms created in the US to become a standard part of the construction of the musical sound.

This music theory is the foundation of the music and everything else is worked in to fit it.
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Old 09-24-2017, 07:33 PM
 
Location: Fortaleza, Brazil
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pueblofuerte View Post
Reggaeton is based on Jamaican music. Not British or American! Jamaica is a powerhouse and is one of the few countries to have influenced the massive British and American sounds/markets.
You're right, Jamaican music is very influential. I should have asked about music that doesn't sound Jamaican/American/British.
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Old 09-24-2017, 07:41 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Originally Posted by MalaMan View Post
You're right, Jamaican music is very influential. I should have asked about music that doesn't sound Jamaican/American/British.
What about classical music? There are radio stations dedicated to it and a number of orchestra’s that record new compositions.
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Old 09-24-2017, 07:42 PM
 
Location: Fortaleza, Brazil
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
American and British music is built on Western music theory. Europe, particularly most of Western Europe is the heart and birthplace of western music theory, particularly Germany and Italy. This spread to most neighboring countries so the music in these countries didn't sound a whole lot different to begin with minus having their own regional flavor. In the US, African rhythms became part of the music using western theory. Because American music was already quite similar to British, German and Italian music in general, it didn't take much for it to spread back and for the rhythms created in the US to become a standard part of the construction of the musical sound.

This music theory is the foundation of the music and everything else is worked in to fit it.
Countries like Germany and Italy have their own national folkloric rhythms, but those native rhythms are almost forgotten in popular "radio music" produced in the last decade in those countries.

In most countries today (including in Asia) the "radio music" produced for the general public all sound like rap, R&B, rock, reggae and other American/British/Jamaican genres.

Only in some regions of the world we see "radio music" produced for the masses today that doesn't sound like the American/British/Jamaican genres. Like in Latin America, parts of the Balkans, parts of the Arab world and parts of Africa.
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Old 09-24-2017, 07:44 PM
 
Location: Fortaleza, Brazil
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Originally Posted by Milky Way Resident View Post
What about classical music? There are radio stations dedicated to it and a number of orchestra’s that record new compositions.
Well, what I'm trying to mean with "radio music" is the music produced for the "mainstream" radio stations, for mass consumption, the songs that are top in the national charts.
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Old 09-24-2017, 07:53 PM
 
Location: Fortaleza, Brazil
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In Asia this is particularly true. If you listen to the music that's being produced today for mass consumption in Japan, South Korea, China, Taiwan, Vietnam, Thailand, Philippines, Malaysia, Indonesia, all sound like American/Jamaican/British genres.

Same in most of Europe, with the exception of some countries in the Balkans.
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Old 09-24-2017, 08:04 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
670 posts, read 180,996 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MalaMan View Post
In Asia this is particularly true. If you listen to the music that's being produced today for mass consumption in Japan, South Korea, China, Taiwan, Vietnam, Thailand, Philippines, Malaysia, Indonesia, all sound like American/Jamaican/British genres.

Same in most of Europe, with the exception of some countries in the Balkans.
I think the reason why pop, rap, reggaeton, rock are popular is because many of them use song structures that bode well for easy listening, with the catchy choruses popping up everywhere.

Even within the rock canon, certain subgenres like alternative, hard or grunge are more popular then progressive which tends to rely on unconventional song structures, not to mention the fact that songs tend to be longer.
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