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Old 11-01-2017, 06:14 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
13,505 posts, read 16,193,269 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brave New World View Post
I would have thought Boston with it's world famous Universities or Washington DC home to the Library of Congress, National Archive, Smithsonian etc would be strong contenders in relation to an intellectual capital of the US.
They would except that they are significantly smaller cities.

The sum total of everything that New York City has is of a greater scale and magnitude than any other city in America. Not surprisingly, that is why it is so expensive to live there, especially Manhattan.
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Old 11-01-2017, 07:33 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
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Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
keep in mind it is the World forum, not the US forum, so "Gotham" in that wider context is not that difficult to be challenged. Cobblestone streets, 19th century row rises, art decor, beaux arts, many cities in the world have more and better of those.
Well, as a native Londoner - just my proverbial two pennies.
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Old 11-01-2017, 10:59 PM
 
897 posts, read 519,320 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by modernist1 View Post
Well, as a native Londoner - just my proverbial two pennies.
There's nothing wrong with New York. Many people just don't get the hype about the city, or think it's unwarranted.

Judging by archive images, I would personally have preferred New York of the mid-20th century to the condition it's in currently.
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Old 11-02-2017, 10:09 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
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I want to point out that Boston and DC are actually large cities with lots to see and do. It’s just that New York City is such a monster that it makes those cities seem small in comparison.
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Old 11-02-2017, 10:13 AM
 
10,553 posts, read 9,172,785 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
I want to point out that Boston and DC are actually large cities with lots to see and do. Itís just that New York City is such a monster that it makes those cities seem small in comparison.
they offer a lot to see but neither is "large", especially if you exclude the sprawling suburbs. Boston in particularly is relatively small.
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Old 11-02-2017, 10:27 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
13,505 posts, read 16,193,269 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
they offer a lot to see but neither is "large", especially if you exclude the sprawling suburbs. Boston in particularly is relatively small.
I think most people would consider a 600,000 city proper population and 6 million metro area population to be a large city, particularly when so many people are commuting into the city during the daytime.
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Old 11-07-2017, 02:48 PM
 
Location: Wilmington, DE
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
I think most people would consider a 600,000 city proper population and 6 million metro area population to be a large city, particularly when so many people are commuting into the city during the daytime.
He's not talking about population but physical city limits, and I'd have to agree. 48 and 68 sq miles is not that large for most Americans, who live in auto-centric cities with city limits that are usually at least 3 times as large, if not larger. While Boston's urban fabric seamlessly blends into it (DC as well, but less so), it is still a physically small city by city proper with a fairly small skyline for its metro size. DC's skyline is non-existent outside of the Washington Memorial and nearby Rosslyn. On foot, these cities outclass the vast majority of America in terms of urbanity and big city feel, but most Americans are accustomed to driving through their cities on interstates and looking at decent sized downtowns (though dead after-hours) with skyscrapers for that "feel". Both are much closer (from the automobile) in feel to the Denvers and Kansas Citys and Minneapolis' of the world than to New York City for the average American.
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Old 11-07-2017, 07:24 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
13,505 posts, read 16,193,269 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by qworldorder View Post
He's not talking about population but physical city limits, and I'd have to agree. 48 and 68 sq miles is not that large for most Americans, who live in auto-centric cities with city limits that are usually at least 3 times as large, if not larger. While Boston's urban fabric seamlessly blends into it (DC as well, but less so), it is still a physically small city by city proper with a fairly small skyline for its metro size. DC's skyline is non-existent outside of the Washington Memorial and nearby Rosslyn. On foot, these cities outclass the vast majority of America in terms of urbanity and big city feel, but most Americans are accustomed to driving through their cities on interstates and looking at decent sized downtowns (though dead after-hours) with skyscrapers for that "feel". Both are much closer (from the automobile) in feel to the Denvers and Kansas Citys and Minneapolis' of the world than to New York City for the average American.
The difference in size between a city like DC/Boston and a city like Kansas City would be pretty obvious to someone visiting these cities. Kansas City is mid-sized whereas DC and Boston are of a greater magnitude in terms of their downtown, urban footprint, density, metro area size and other factors. So, they would not feel the same.

But it’s true that they’re closer to one another than they are to New York City. That city is clearly the outlier in the U.S.
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Old 11-12-2017, 11:44 PM
 
Location: Alexandria, Commonwealth of Virginia
1,109 posts, read 550,426 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by survivingearth View Post
Santiago Chile was a great surprise for me. Very clean and modern. People are friendly and the cities infrastructures are pretty good.
I hated Santiago. Much preferred Valparaiso. Santiago was pollution, commieblocks and old 80s buildings. There were a few nuggets, but sorely lacking for a city of 6-7 million.
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Old 11-12-2017, 11:47 PM
 
Location: Alexandria, Commonwealth of Virginia
1,109 posts, read 550,426 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Selen View Post
I think LA is more beautiful than NYC in terms of nature. Also weather is warmer in LA than NY. NYC can be very windy sometimes. When I was in LA it was comfortable in high 20s low 30 degrees though I know it can reach to uncomfortable 40s. Santa Monica, Manhattan beach, Redondo beach were all very beautiful. Marina Del Rey was awesome. Also Disneyland and Universal Studios are great. Oh and the beautiful homes of Beverly Hills. Even not so rich neighbourhoods like Westchester are pretty. The architecture in LA is also more varied. You can see homes you may see in Connecticut or Mexico. I also like the laid back attitude in LA as opposed to NYC where everyone seems to be serious and in a rush.
I loved LA. I did a West Coast trip this past August (Las Vegas, Grand Canyon, Los Angeles, San Francisco) and LA was my favorite.

I really enjoyed Santa Monica, Venice and Venice Beach, Disneyland, Huntington Beach, Downtown (beautiful architecture!), Griffith Observatory, Beverly Hills, etc. The only overhyped was Hollywood (which was horrible). Next time I need to visit Malibu, Laguna Beach, Channel Islands, Santa Barbara, etc.
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