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Old 11-09-2017, 03:23 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whogoesthere View Post
From a "book" learning perspective, it is quite easy for a foreigner to know more about a country than a native...from a "street" or "on the ground' perspective, the native usually knows more.
Example, a foreigner might be able to do a lecture on the beginnings of hip hop. A Bronx native would be able to tell you what was hot on the street at the time and how people really reacted to this new music.
This right here.

From my own experience, I know hell of a lot regarding Russian history, more so than about any Russian I ever encountered. However, it took living there and being around relatives, etc, to know the little, unwritten things about daily life there and how people conduct themselves for any given event.
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Old 11-09-2017, 05:09 PM
 
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Humans are always subjective too. The locals usually love their culture, language, and history even if they say otherwise. Outsiders will never have the same feeling. Good or bad.
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Old 11-09-2017, 05:11 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DTL3000 View Post
It really depends. I think a native may always beat an outsider on the "ground level" or how day-to-day life is carried on. However, I think it's more of a class thing than local/foreigner. A poor working class stiff with a marginal education who barely leaves his neighborhood might not have the same grasp of the big picture as say a foreign diplomat who conducts business in all of the country's major cities and has, as a job requirement, the responsibility to know the political system and the customs and culture of their host nation.
I agree with your assessment here.
It all depends what kind of "foreigner" and what kind of "native" we are talking about...
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Old 11-09-2017, 05:13 PM
 
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Language barrier is a big issue.

For example, many educated Russians can read articles from English media, but very few educated Americans can read Russian. As a result, Americans are often fed with western perspectives only, no matter it is "liberal" or "conservative".

In China the barrier is bilateral. In terms of ratio, very few educated Chinese are fluent in English and vice versa.
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Old 11-09-2017, 07:48 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettafish View Post
In China the barrier is bilateral. In terms of ratio, very few educated Chinese are fluent in English and vice versa.
In a sense a double language barrier-not only are the spoken languages unrelated, but the writing systems are completely different.

Beyond the language barrier-cultures having completely different roots.
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Old 11-10-2017, 10:31 AM
 
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How well does an outsider know the cultural DNA of another nation? For example, the junta in Argentina seems to have under estimated the determination of the British to fight if attacked.
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Old 12-26-2017, 03:49 PM
 
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You can be book smart, educated, speak 5 languages, travelled..
Being “Native” is heartfelt.
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Old 12-26-2017, 05:10 PM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
1,870 posts, read 604,567 times
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If you ask a native for an overview of some aspect of their country, they might be inclined to mention only those things that they either regard as a curiosity themselves, or contrast with those of your culture. But it might occur to them to mention the most obvious and familiar things. Which could mean that an essential foundation is just left out. All foreground with no background.
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Old 12-29-2017, 05:42 PM
 
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Alarmingly naÔve with too much people disappointing themselves after long term residency if they arenít developing this type of expertise. Not able to offer satisfactory tips on guidance after abundant cases. Literally every city, town, region, international country that I go to I find the best stores on my own with a traveling companion. Divine intervention occurring on my own research of the Internet World Wide Web laptop computer browsing. Foreign visitors exhilaration ride is usually quite very fast for their own exposure. Thus, they have natural tendencies to figure out main events quickly compared to natives not in that type of survival mode. Each identity is absolutely always alien to the other. Unknown land migrating versus familiar territory.
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Old 12-30-2017, 01:46 PM
 
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In regard to culture, native. Every single time. Even most immigrants never learn the nuance of local culture like somebody who grew up in it. They still screw up the slang, don't fully understand the body language or get a feel for the inner workings of a community. That holds true even for Joe Timeclock who works at the local mill for 50 weeks a year and takes to weeks off to drink beer in his backyard. The US, which the most open of books when it comes to culture, is often misunderstood culturally by otherwise well-educated foreigners.

OTH, natives are often woefully unaware of the bigger picture. Stuff like politics and local history are almost alien to many. When I lived in the UK, we visited Stonehenge 3 times because of different visitors coming. Most of friends had never been there.
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