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Old 02-10-2018, 11:40 PM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
2,001 posts, read 734,412 times
Reputation: 4053

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Quote:
Originally Posted by marlaver View Post
Here we use bidet, but always in combination with toilet paper.
And yes, bidet is one of the best inventions of humanity
Recently there was a lady in our house on a business call, and asked to use the bathroom My wife said Sure and showed her the way. Later, I mentioned to her "You do remember that we do not own any toilet paper at all, right?" I think maybe we should keep a roll, for visitors. I always had one (the same one) on the roller in my house in the US.

Really, since we seem to be going down this road, if you had poo on any other part of your body, would you just give it a quick wipe with a piece of paper and call it good enough?
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Old 02-11-2018, 01:09 AM
 
Location: New Mexico
4,984 posts, read 2,819,554 times
Reputation: 9186
Salt and water
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Old 02-11-2018, 08:39 AM
 
213 posts, read 125,381 times
Reputation: 171
It's concrete.
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Old 02-11-2018, 07:37 PM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
2,001 posts, read 734,412 times
Reputation: 4053
Quote:
Originally Posted by pinytr View Post
It's concrete.
Technically, it's Portland Cement, invented in the mid-1800s by William Aspdin, not exactly a household name, but he made it all possible. Aspdin is best known for being a swindler and a scoundrel.
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Old 02-12-2018, 08:30 AM
 
Location: France, Bordeaux
380 posts, read 184,899 times
Reputation: 439
Quote:
Originally Posted by cebuan View Post
Technically, it's Portland Cement, invented in the mid-1800s by William Aspdin, not exactly a household name, but he made it all possible. Aspdin is best known for being a swindler and a scoundrel.
On the French Wiki of Aspdin, there is a doubt on the origin of his work (he was not a chemist and the patent remains vague), we talk more about Louis Vicat as inventor of artificial cement.
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Old 02-12-2018, 11:38 AM
 
Location: San Diego CA
3,695 posts, read 2,825,243 times
Reputation: 5835
Starbucks coffee and McDonalds Big Macs and fries. You would be hard pressed to find anywhere in the world that these food products aren't available.
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Old 02-13-2018, 04:12 AM
 
Location: the dairyland
1,157 posts, read 1,823,392 times
Reputation: 1425
Quote:
Originally Posted by msgsing View Post
Starbucks coffee and McDonalds Big Macs and fries. You would be hard pressed to find anywhere in the world that these food products aren't available.
Starbucks is only available in 75 out of 200 or so countries, McDonalds in 121. There are lots of things that are more common world wide...
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Old 02-13-2018, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Taipei, Taiwan
6,507 posts, read 4,596,038 times
Reputation: 4244
Quote:
Originally Posted by cebuan View Post
I didn't say that. I said they don't buy rolls of commercially manufactured and marketed toilet paper. Have you ever heard of a bidet? Or they use various alternatives that don't cost a day's wages per roll. Like dry grass or leaves, or sand. Or like your American grandparents did, catalog pages. Or just water, which believe it or not, is the same thing you use for your Saturday night bath. They are not bound to America's tribal customs.
Bidets are only popular in Europe.

You're being really hyperbolic by saying that toilet papers cost a day's wages per roll.
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Old 02-13-2018, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Finland
24,268 posts, read 17,256,339 times
Reputation: 11103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greysholic View Post
Bidets are only popular in Europe.
In Southern Europe + Germany I could clarify. In Northern and most of Central Europe bidets are rare.

Though in Finland bidet showers are common for some reason.
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Old 02-14-2018, 07:13 PM
 
6,041 posts, read 10,266,333 times
Reputation: 3042
Quantify what I am given with these results on http://www.worldstopexports.com/worl...port-products/ Open sesame behold economic mysterious items from basic source. Embrace!

Rank Product Category 2014 Exports % World Total

1. Oil $3 trillion 16.2%

2. Electronics $2.4 trillion 12.6%

3. Machines, Engines, Pumps $2.1 trillion 11.4%

4. Vehicles $1.4 trillion 7.4%

5. Gems, Precious Metals, Crystals, Coins $694.4 billion 3.7%

6. Plastics $612.5 billion 3.3%


7. Medical, technical $570.2 billion 3.1%

8. Pharmaceuticals $509.8 billion 2.7%

9. Organic chemicals $430.6 billion 2.3%

10. Iron, Steel, Concrete $409.4 billion 2.2%

11. Airplanes, Spacecraft $318.4 billion 1.7%

12. Iron Steel products $316.5 billion 1.7%

13. Furniture $243.5 billion 1.3%


14. Knit Or Crochet Clothing $238.5 billion 1.3%

15. Clothing (Not Knit Or Crochet) $234.9 billion 1.3%

16. Ores, Slag, Ash $222.4 billion 1.2%

17. Other Chemicals $191.1 billion 1.0%

18. Rubber $190.8 billion 1.0%

19. Paper $173.3 billion 0.9%

20. Aluminum $172.4 billion 0.9%

21. Copper $153.1 billion 0.8%

22. Shoes, Sandals $144.8 billion 0.8%

23. Wood $140.9 billion 0.8%

24. Ships, Boats $131.3 billion 0.7%

25. Meat $131.0 billion 0.7%

26. Inorganic chemicals $118.3 billion 0.6%

27. Cereals $118.0 billion 0.6%

28. Perfumes, cosmetics $114.9 billion 0.6%

29. Alcoholic beverages $111.6 billion 0.6%

30. Fish $111 billion 0.6%

31. Fruits, Nuts $103.4 billion 0.6%

32. Oil Seed $100.1 billion 0.5%

33. Dairy, Eggs, Honey $96.7 billion 0.5%

34. Animal/Vegetable Fats Oils $96.5 billion 0.5%

35. Toys, Games $91.8 billion 0.5%

36. Tanning, Dyeing Extracts $83.0 billion 0.4%

37. Food waste, animal fodder $82.0 billion 0.4%

38. Leather, Animal Gut Articles $76.3 billion 0.4%

39. Glass $69.8 billion 0.4%

40. Cereal, Milk Preparations $67.4 billion 0.4%

41. Base Metal tools, Cutlery $67.2 billion 0.4%

42. Other Base Metals $66.5 billion 0.4%

43. Other Food Preparations $66.1 billion 0.4%

44. Vegetables $66 billion 0.4%

45. Fertilizers $65.5 billion 0.4%

46. Other Textiles, Worn Clothing $64.9 billion 0.3%

47. Cotton $63.5 billion 0.3%

48. Vegetable/Fruit Preparations $60.8 billion 0.3%

49. Soaps, Lubricants, Candles $59.4 billion 0.3%

50. Clocks Watches $56.9 billion 0.3%

51. Ceramic Products (Cups, Plates) $53.9 billion 0.3%

52. Other Industry Products $49.6 billion 0.3%

53. Stone, Plaster, Cement $49.5 billion 0.3%

54. Meat And Seafood Preparations $49.4 billion 0.3%

55. Cocoa $49.4 billion 0.3%

56. People Made Filaments $49.3 billion 0.3%

57. Coffee, Tea, Spices $48.4 billion 0.3%

58. Salt, Sulphur, Stone, Cement $47.5 billion 0.3%

59. Sugar $46.1 billion 0.2%

60. Woodpulp $45.5 billion 0.2%

61. Books, Newspapers, Pictures $44.9 billion 0.2%

62. Railway, Trams $43 billion 0.2%

63. Tobacco $41.6 billion 0.2%

64. People Made Staple Fibers $41.2 billion 0.2%

65. Raw Hides Excluding Furskins $36.3 billion 0.2%

66. Knitted Or Crocheted Fabric $33.7 billion 0.2%

67. Nickel $30.1 billion 0.2%

68. Modified Starches, Enzymes $29.5 billion 0.2%

69. Collector Items, Antiques $27.5 billion 0.1%

70. Coated Textile Fabric $26.2 billion 0.1%

71. Felt, Yarn, Twine, Cordage $25.3 billion 0.1%

72. Live Animals $23.3 billion 0.1%

73. Live Trees And Plants $22.5 billion 0.1%

74. Milling Products $18.9 billion 0.1%

75. Other Base Metals $18.1 billion 0.1%

76. Photo/Cinematographic $16.2 billion 0.1%

77. Textile Floor Coverings $16.0 billion 0.1%

78. Art $15.6 billion 0.1%

79. Wool $14.3 billion 0.1%

80. Special Woven/Tufted Fabric $13.6 billion 0.1%

81. Arms, Ammunition $13.3 billion 0.1%

82. Furskins Artificial Fur $12.6 billion 0.1%

83. Other Animal-Origin Products $10.7 billion 0.1%

84. Headgear $9.2 billion 0.05%

85. Feathers, Artificial Flowers, Hair $8.6 billion 0.05%

86. Gums, Resins $8.6 billion 0.05%

87. Lead $7.6 billion 0.04%

88. Tin $7.4 billion 0.04%

89. Musical Instruments $6.5 billion 0.03%


90. Paper Yarn, Woven Fabric $4.7 billion 0.03%

91. Explosives, Pyrotechnics $4.6 billion 0.02%

92. Umbrellas, Walking Sticks $4 billion 0.02%

93. Silk $2.8 billion 0.02%

94. Plaiting Products, Basketwork $2.4 billion 0.01%

95. Cork $1.8 billion 0.01%

96. Vegetable products $878,179,000 million 0.005%

Bold classification labels for my favorite ones that I deem useful. After scanning through these rich data records crucial information matters, I am trying to figure out if Gold, Nutritional Vitamins, Souvenirs are already in legitimate radar.
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