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Old Today, 06:47 AM
 
10,698 posts, read 9,270,705 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarisaAnna View Post
However I do think that living in a small space is not as much of a handicap as some people seem to think. Increasingly, around the world, people get used to it and adapt.
Yes I agree. I love living in small space. I usually live under 650sf (60sm) or under, which is more than enough. Right now, about 500sf and I don't think it is small at all. When I was a kid, my family of 4 lives in a 3 bedroom apartment totally 800sf.

However, the space in HK is not just regular small. According the Guardian, The average living space for per person in HK is just 50 sq ft, the equivalent of just half a parking space. Imagine a family of 4 living in an apartment of 200sf.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...on-cells-study

So you still think such a small space in not a handicap?
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Old Today, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Honolulu
731 posts, read 240,615 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
Yes I agree. I love living in small space. I usually live under 650sf (60sm) or under, which is more than enough. Right now, about 500sf and I don't think it is small at all. When I was a kid, my family of 4 lives in a 3 bedroom apartment totally 800sf.

However, the space in HK is not just regular small. According the Guardian, The average living space for per person in HK is just 50 sq ft, the equivalent of just half a parking space. Imagine a family of 4 living in an apartment of 200sf.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...on-cells-study

So you still think such a small space in not a handicap?
Read the content of the Guardian article:

Liu Cheung-wai has lived with his wife and nine-year-old daughter in a two room shack built among a labyrinth of structures on a building rooftop. The builder moved from China five years ago with his family in search of better education for his daughter and higher wages.

“This is all we can afford, many newcomers live in places like this at first,” Liu said. “But I didn’t think we would still be here after so many years.”

The family of three shares a space that’s roughly 170 sq ft, just over the average in the studies findings, although their house was not part of the study.

Liu’s daughter misses her old home in neighbouring Guangdong province, a concrete box with four rooms and a kitchen.

“We had more space there,” she said.
_____________________________________________

The housing crunch problem in Hong Kong is mainly contributed by immigrants like Mr. Liu who come to the City to seek better living. Every year over 53,000 immigrants from Mainland China come to Hong Kong. There is no way for any City to provide enough housing (public and private) to accommodate such large influx of population.
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Old Today, 01:47 PM
 
6,189 posts, read 3,930,273 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian_Lee View Post
Actually there are quite a lot of homeless people in Japan and South Korea. In the subway stations in Seoul, there are always homeless people seeking shelter in the long and winding underground walkway. In Osaka, many homeless camp out in parks.

But generally East Asians feel it is a shame to be homeless and they seldom bother you.
Not even remotely close to what you see in Paris or Los Angeles. I noticed more homelessness in Paris and Brussels within a day than I’d ever witnessed in Taiwan in my whole life.

Last edited by Greysholic; Today at 01:59 PM..
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Old Today, 03:15 PM
 
Location: Firenze
154 posts, read 90,119 times
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Venice, Italy.
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Old Today, 03:31 PM
 
225 posts, read 53,644 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielsa1775 View Post
Its interesting that Hong Kong, Schenzen and Macau are all in the top 10, given three cities are only 70 km apart.

Personally i have been to every east asian and european city on the list. Id go for Istanbul, Barcelona or Seoul.
Not really all that surprising - it's called China. And the Chinese (all 1.4 billion of them) have cash to burn and places to visit. Hong Kong and Macau are relatively no brainers for them to begin with it.

I like to say, for a foreigner (not Chinese) Hong Kong is 1 and a half steps into China but for the Chinese person, Hong Kong is half a step into the West.
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Old Today, 03:32 PM
 
225 posts, read 53,644 times
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Also the title is mislead - the list is that of most heavily visited, whereas I suspect favorite cities would be different and Italy would saturate the list.
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