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Old 12-04-2017, 06:44 PM
 
946 posts, read 1,364,296 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
No, NYC is way higher than anywhere else. Actually the only US city with more than half of people who use transit to go to work.
I am not disputing that NYC has higher public transit usage. All cities that are larger will have higher percentage of public transportation usage. That's a given. We're talking about being "out of place". If you are standing among the skyscrapers in Chicago or even in San Francisco's Financial District, it does not look or feel like you are in another country compared to NYC.
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Old Yesterday, 03:07 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenTiger View Post
I am not disputing that NYC has higher public transit usage. All cities that are larger will have higher percentage of public transportation usage. That's a given.

We're talking about being "out of place". If you are standing among the skyscrapers in Chicago or even in San Francisco's Financial District, it does not look or feel like you are in another country compared to NYC.
no. it is not a give. The second and four largest cities in the US have low transit use than many smaller cities.

Your second point is moot. If you stand at the financial district of Shanghai or Paris, they are not drastically from midtown Manhattan either. It is not the CBDs that make cities different, it is the average lifestyle for common people. For example, most NYers live in apartments. Nobody moves to NYC and expect to own a 2000sf two story home with two garages, and the first thing they do is to sell their cars (not always, but often). It is not the same for Chicago or DC.

NYC is a very atypical American city, with very different lifestyle. It is the only place in America where the urban life is at similar levels with European or Asian cities. Chicago, San Francisco are still pretty typical American cities. 3/4 of SF's land is zoned for lowrise residential. Nothing is more North American than that.
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Old Yesterday, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
2,769 posts, read 1,150,649 times
Reputation: 1534
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pueblofuerte View Post
Nice, I think St. Augustine, Florida can be considered as well.

https://goo.gl/maps/rXQPFHHB85R2
St. Augustine is also pretty unique, but once you leave the central part of the city it just looks like any other city in Florida, and you don't have to go that far out either.

https://www.google.com/maps/@29.8961...7i13312!8i6656
https://www.google.com/maps/@29.8874...7i13312!8i6656
https://www.google.com/maps/@29.8913...7i13312!8i6656
https://www.google.com/maps/@29.8919...7i13312!8i6656

But in Santa Fe even the newer developments are built in the adobe style, I have yet to see a city in the US to use a theme so extensively through out the city.

https://www.google.com/maps/@35.6625...7i13312!8i6656
https://www.google.com/maps/@35.6494...7i13312!8i6656
https://www.google.com/maps/@35.6241...7i13312!8i6656
https://www.google.com/maps/@35.5892...7i13312!8i6656

Santa Fe suburbs are the only place that doesn't look like generic Americana suburbia.
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Old Yesterday, 10:49 AM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,296 posts, read 19,393,273 times
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I'm American and New York is definitely the most out of the place. It is super dense, vibrant 24/7, people tend to be rude / very up front, public transit everywhere, and more politically liberal. Most US cities have a small urban core that mostly shuts down after 7pm and is surrounded by car depended suburbs. NYC still has lots of suburbs that are similar to much of the USA but 7 million of its 20 million residents live in true urban areas.
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Old Yesterday, 12:17 PM
 
959 posts, read 1,864,010 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Milky Way Resident View Post
This may sound weird, but I always felt like NYC differs from the archetypal American city. While most cities in the US are characterised by a definitive CBD that becomes quiet after hours, with lots of suburban sprawl and an inadequate level of public transportation , New York breaks most of these stereotypes. It has a vast subway network, a highly urbanized core that remains lively throughout the week. Itís kinda ironic when you consider the fact that NYC is often used as the poster boy of the US, yet in many ways itís a quite atypical American city.
Yes! When you're right, you're right! If, of course, you don't count Boston and Washington and Chicago and San Francisco and Seattle and Los Angeles and ... then New York is absolutely unique!
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Old Yesterday, 12:19 PM
 
959 posts, read 1,864,010 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
I'm American and New York is definitely the most out of the place. It is super dense, vibrant 24/7, people tend to be rude / very up front, public transit everywhere, and more politically liberal. Most US cities have a small urban core that mostly shuts down after 7pm and is surrounded by car depended suburbs. NYC still has lots of suburbs that are similar to much of the USA but 7 million of its 20 million residents live in true urban areas.
Not to mention that for decades they have almost singlehandedly cornered the market in black textiles and leather!
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Old Yesterday, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
2,769 posts, read 1,150,649 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
I'm American and New York is definitely the most out of the place. It is super dense, vibrant 24/7, people tend to be rude / very up front, public transit everywhere, and more politically liberal. Most US cities have a small urban core that mostly shuts down after 7pm and is surrounded by car depended suburbs. NYC still has lots of suburbs that are similar to much of the USA but 7 million of its 20 million residents live in true urban areas.
I think New York uniqueness just comes from it's size. The reason why LA is so different is because it's a sunbelt city and developed much latter, if all that growth had gone to Chicago instead, it would be New York City 2.0. Other wise every country is just going to name their largest city. Russia will say Moscow, Mexico will say Mexico City, Panama will say Panama City, Thailand will say Bangkok, Turkey will say Istanbul, Argentina will say Buenos Aires, Chile will say Santiago, Ukraine will say Kiev, Greece will say Athens, Japan will say Tokyo. If NYC is a agreed to be the most out of place city in the USA this thread is going to be very boring and predictable.
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Old Yesterday, 01:07 PM
 
Location: London, UK
1,830 posts, read 801,375 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grega94 View Post
I think New York uniqueness just comes from it's size. The reason why LA is so different is because it's a sunbelt city and developed much latter, if all that growth had gone to Chicago instead, it would be New York City 2.0. Other wise every country is just going to name their largest city. Russia will say Moscow, Mexico will say Mexico City, Panama will say Panama City, Thailand will say Bangkok, Turkey will say Istanbul, Argentina will say Buenos Aires, Chile will say Santiago, Ukraine will say Kiev, Greece will say Athens, Japan will say Tokyo. If NYC is a agreed to be the most out of place city in the USA this thread is going to be very boring and predictable.
I agree, a lot has to do with size but some of the countries you mentioned have no relevant second metropolis', like Panama & Thailand, so not the best examples. New York is definitely a heightened version of cities in the Bos-Wash corridor and Chicago was indeed on its way to becoming NYC 2.0, it just didn't have the geographic advantages NYC did. However, there is definitely a kinship between New York-Toronto-Chicago.

Other countries however do have more fundamental reasons why their largest city is the most out of place compared to the grouping of other cities. Including factors such as architecture, climate, ethnicity, pop culture and lifestyle.
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Old Yesterday, 01:45 PM
 
10,758 posts, read 9,314,662 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grega94 View Post
I think New York uniqueness just comes from it's size. The reason why LA is so different is because it's a sunbelt city and developed much latter, if all that growth had gone to Chicago instead, it would be New York City 2.0. Other wise every country is just going to name their largest city. Russia will say Moscow, Mexico will say Mexico City, Panama will say Panama City, Thailand will say Bangkok, Turkey will say Istanbul, Argentina will say Buenos Aires, Chile will say Santiago, Ukraine will say Kiev, Greece will say Athens, Japan will say Tokyo. If NYC is a agreed to be the most out of place city in the USA this thread is going to be very boring and predictable.
Not really. Only small countries with one dominate city will do that.

Will Germans say Berlin is completely "out of place"? No. Rome for Italy? Madrid for Spain? Shanghai for China? Mumbai for India? Sydney for Australia? Toronto for Canada?

Even Paris is not so vastly different from other French cities, although the second largest is like 1/6 of its size, because Paris is just an over-sized French city, but people still have relatively similar lifestyle as those in other cities such as Bordeaux or Nantes, except a bit busier, more expensive and congested. Paris essentially looks the same as other French cities, the same type of buildings and infrastructure, public space, services (train stations, post offices) except on a much larger scale. On the other hand, the typical NYC city landscape and lifestyle is very different from most smaller American cities. And this makes NYC "out of place".
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Old Yesterday, 02:40 PM
 
Location: In the heights
16,853 posts, read 19,083,308 times
Reputation: 8321
For the US, aside from NYC, Iíd say that Honolulu is also a very atypical city. Itís a sizable city far removed from the rest of the US with a strong local culture, very unique flora and fauna, and a demographic profile quite different from elsewhere.

If we count non-states, then a lot of them are pretty different with Puerto Rico and its cities being particularly different with Spanish being its main day to day language by far.
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