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Old 12-06-2017, 06:04 AM
 
Location: western East Roman Empire
5,647 posts, read 9,412,435 times
Reputation: 4227

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Quote:
Originally Posted by fibonacci View Post
NYC? Are you kidding? It is quintessentially American. It has crazy amounts of diversity which reflect its Ellis Island roots and how it has continued to be a portal for immigrants to this day.

Out of place:. Miami. It feels like a completely different country from how the people look, the architecture, food and languages spoken.
Do you realize how contradictory those two assertions are:

1) NYC is quintessentially American because of diversity, immigrants, etc.

2) Miami feels like a different country because of diversity, immigrants, etc.

Please go back to Logic 101.

Miami is about 300 years younger than NYC, both quintessentially American, and at about an analogous pace when adjusting for stage in history, technology, etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by survivingearth View Post
The entire northeast of Italy seems out of place
In terms of political pretensions, maybe, but in terms of urban landscape hardly, even taking into account the uniqueness of Venice.
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Old 12-06-2017, 06:22 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
13,618 posts, read 16,353,995 times
Reputation: 9347
Quote:
Originally Posted by bale002 View Post
Miami is about 300 years younger than NYC, both quintessentially American, and at about an analogous pace when adjusting for stage in history, technology, etc.
South Florida has a strong Caribbean influence that makes it stand out right now.

But eventually, all of those people's children and their descendants will learn English and blend in with the rest of America.
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Old 12-06-2017, 06:25 AM
 
10,827 posts, read 9,365,632 times
Reputation: 7381
Quote:
Originally Posted by bale002 View Post
Do you realize how contradictory those two assertions are:

1) NYC is quintessentially American because of diversity, immigrants, etc.

2) Miami feels like a different country because of diversity, immigrants, etc.

Please go back to Logic 101.


Let's not forget most of the US is not diverse, only in large cities, which is exactly why NYC is special, far from being "quintessential American" - that is probably somewhere in Iowa or South Dakota.
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Old 12-06-2017, 06:28 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
13,618 posts, read 16,353,995 times
Reputation: 9347
Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post


Let's not forget most of the US is not diverse, only in large cities, which is exactly why NYC is special, far from being "quintessential American" - that is probably somewhere in Iowa or South Dakota.
NYC will always be like that. JFK airport is the modern-day Ellis Island.

It feels like the whole world is coming in through that airport.
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Old 12-06-2017, 07:23 AM
 
Location: western East Roman Empire
5,647 posts, read 9,412,435 times
Reputation: 4227
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
South Florida has a strong Caribbean influence that makes it stand out right now.

But eventually, all of those people's children and their descendants will learn English and blend in with the rest of America.
Exactly. It takes about three generations and it is happening right now.

At the same time, it will probably remain a gateway for new immigration, and in that sense renew itself, or renew the cycle.

Hence, like New York City, it is not an "either/or" proposition, it is "both/and".
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Old 12-06-2017, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Buenos Aires and La Plata, ARG
1,783 posts, read 1,311,305 times
Reputation: 1194
I don't find NYC "out of place" at all. Come on! Miami, Honolulu, DC's masonic grid, the old centre of New Orleans, and cities in the west coast like Sacramento or Portland (both whom have a more European layout) are more atypical within the US.

---

Here, among big cities, Mendoza (very few highrises, the urban ditchs, and distinct tree planting) and Salta (most colonial centre, a more "latinamerican" vibe). In any town: Ushuaia, no doubt. Is the least image one might think when thinking about Argentina.

Last edited by marlaver; 12-06-2017 at 11:30 AM..
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Old 12-06-2017, 12:34 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
2,792 posts, read 1,164,514 times
Reputation: 1537
Quote:
Originally Posted by marlaver View Post
I don't find NYC "out of place" at all. Come on! Miami, Honolulu, DC's masonic grid, the old centre of New Orleans, and cities in the west coast like Sacramento or Portland (both whom have a more European layout) are more atypical within the US.

---

Here, among big cities, Mendoza (very few highrises, the urban ditchs, and distinct tree planting) and Salta (most colonial centre, a more "latinamerican" vibe). In any town: Ushuaia, no doubt. Is the least image one might think when thinking about Argentina.
I think some of the cities further south in Chile/Argentina might seem a bit out of place, just because of the winter snow since most people think of hot steamy jungles when they think of South America.
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Old 12-06-2017, 02:04 PM
 
Location: London, UK
1,846 posts, read 811,534 times
Reputation: 943
Quote:
Originally Posted by grega94 View Post
I think some of the cities further south in Chile/Argentina might seem a bit out of place, just because of the winter snow since most people think of hot steamy jungles when they think of South America.
What kind of people think of hot, steamy jungles in Chile and Argentina? Please don't tell me this is a common perception in the States - let's try to at least play down the stupid stereotype.

In fact only about 22 million people out of 422 million live in hot steamy jungles in South America; the biggest 10 cities of which being...

Manaus (Brazil): 2.1 million
Belem (Brazil): 2 million
Porto Velho (Brazil): 520k
Iquitos (Peru): 470k
Macapá (Brazil): 470k
Buenaventura (Col): 380k
Boa Vista (Brazil): 330k
Santarém (Brazil): 295k
Pucallpa (Peru): 210k
Florencia (Col): 160k
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Old 12-06-2017, 04:44 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
2,792 posts, read 1,164,514 times
Reputation: 1537
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pueblofuerte View Post
What kind of people think of hot, steamy jungles in Chile and Argentina? Please don't tell me this is a common perception in the States - let's try to at least play down the stupid stereotype.

In fact only about 22 million people out of 422 million live in hot steamy jungles in South America; the biggest 10 cities of which being...

Manaus (Brazil): 2.1 million
Belem (Brazil): 2 million
Porto Velho (Brazil): 520k
Iquitos (Peru): 470k
Macapá (Brazil): 470k
Buenaventura (Col): 380k
Boa Vista (Brazil): 330k
Santarém (Brazil): 295k
Pucallpa (Peru): 210k
Florencia (Col): 160k
IDK what everybody else thinks, but I know when I was a kid watching the Olympics, and Argentina was playing Volleyball, and my Dad was complaining that it wasn't fair since they were from a hot country and are used to the heat. I corrected him and told him that Argentina isn't all that hot, but he looked at me like I was crazy and said that it's in south America on the equator, and told me not to argue with him
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Old 12-06-2017, 06:22 PM
Status: "SENSE OF PRIDE AND ACCOMPLISHMENT" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: NYntarctica
10,662 posts, read 4,634,516 times
Reputation: 3716
Quote:
Originally Posted by marlaver View Post
I don't find NYC "out of place" at all. Come on! Miami, Honolulu, DC's masonic grid, the old centre of New Orleans, and cities in the west coast like Sacramento or Portland (both whom have a more European layout) are more atypical within the US.

---

Here, among big cities, Mendoza (very few highrises, the urban ditchs, and distinct tree planting) and Salta (most colonial centre, a more "latinamerican" vibe). In any town: Ushuaia, no doubt. Is the least image one might think when thinking about Argentina.
I thought all Argentinian cities I visited were relatively similar; square grid, French-inspired architecture, tree lined streets, altho you're right that Mendoza is different. Mendozans have a very neutral accent compared to the Sheismo of Buenos Aires and the surrounding areas
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