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Old 12-12-2017, 12:30 PM
 
6,266 posts, read 6,098,121 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 6oo9 View Post
Kashgar in the original thread post is in China but on the ancient Silk Road. Local Muslim turks and their culture are native to land. However, China certainly claims land ownership and any separatists attempts would be met with force.

Silk Road played a big role in world history and much of its fundamentals are still around. Europe aways wanted to trade with China (drove Columbus out to sea and found America), Muslims/Arabs are in the middle either helping or sabotaging the trade.
Before the Turks came, the residents in Kashgar region were Tocharians and some Persian peoples. Even Han Chinese reached there earlier than Turks, noted in books of Han Dynasty.

The Turks literally wiped local culture off and converted every survivor to Islam.
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Old 12-13-2017, 05:11 AM
 
Location: western East Roman Empire
6,112 posts, read 10,148,533 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
It is Ironic because it is the only American city of it's kind. To me, quintessential suggests the more typical or perfect example. Unless San Francisco, Seattle, Chicago, Atlanta, Dallas and San Diego are more like NYC than they are not, I would say those are the quintessential American cities.
The OP's question is "out of place".

US cities are symbiotic, especially since in the 1840s-1920s period: it is hard to imagine western Ohio or Iowa, for example, without railroad links to New York City, which at one time was mainly agricultural.

The one would not be what it is without the other.
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Old 12-13-2017, 09:57 PM
 
6,041 posts, read 10,356,467 times
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Ethnic heritage not my own nationality first: Romania(Wow, first instance of not going this summer after three endlessly entertaining exclusive years in a row that aren’t ever resembling the other one in the calendar. I miss my own real homeland. Technically lived there in the year 2016): Out of visiting and residency status, Constanta of the Black Sea is anomalous to entire remainder of the country. Turkish inspiration is strong, the only major city with the Ocean feel, past developing in their own nightlife district by the beach promenade of Mamaia, allowing Middle East nightlife with Hookah smoke(only in Bucharest periphery when leaving this summer months beach community paradise for points of alliance), furthest away geographically culturally daily lifestyle wise from Transylvania Carpathian regions.
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Old 12-13-2017, 11:04 PM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
1,951 posts, read 1,065,111 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Milky Way Resident View Post
This may sound weird, but I always felt like NYC differs from the archetypal American city. While most cities in the US are characterised by a definitive CBD that becomes quiet after hours, with lots of suburban sprawl and an inadequate level of public transportation , New York breaks most of these stereotypes. It has a vast subway network, a highly urbanized core that remains lively throughout the week. It’s kinda ironic when you consider the fact that NYC is often used as the poster boy of the US, yet in many ways it’s a quite atypical American city.
I don’t think it’s weird. I’m a NYer and I agree with this. I definitely do feel out of place in other cities and States across the country. I think it’s safe to say that we are unique and there is no other place in the US like us. But OTOH we are America’s main premiere city and probably the first that many foreigners think of when they think of America. So even though we are not anything like a typical American city, we kind of are the face of America and American cities in a way.

Weirdly enough, Miami is one other city where I don’t really feel out of place when I go visit even though it is extremely different from NYC. There’s some sort of strong connection between NYC and MIA. They’ve gotta be 2 of the most frequently traveled between cities in the entire world.

Other contenders would probably be New Orleans and Honolulu. And possibly somewhere in Alaska too? Idk
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Old 12-14-2017, 11:14 PM
 
4,454 posts, read 5,486,094 times
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At ethnic enclaves of the big cities.
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Old 12-16-2017, 01:27 PM
 
1,030 posts, read 2,011,096 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NigerianNightmare View Post
New York density and lifestyle (no car to commute) isn't out of place in South America, Africa, Asia, Europe. San Francisco, Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles and Seattle are the same density of Lagos suburbs or lower, Tokyo suburbs or lower, Paris suburbs or lower etcetera. While I will say in the density argument Seoul, Hong Kong and Istanbul definitely win due to the overwhelming majority living in apartments.
What?!? This is one of those City-Data forum moments when "reading comprehension is in order" ... The post I was responding to was this:

"Originally Posted by Milky Way Resident
This may sound weird, but I always felt like NYC differs from the archetypal American city. While most cities in the US are characterised by a definitive CBD that becomes quiet after hours, with lots of suburban sprawl and an inadequate level of public transportation , New York breaks most of these stereotypes. It has a vast subway network, a highly urbanized core that remains lively throughout the week. It’s kinda ironic when you consider the fact that NYC is often used as the poster boy of the US, yet in many ways it’s a quite atypical American city."

which has little to do with density, and absolutely zero to do with Lagos, for that matter. The post was about things like quietness after hours, suburban sprawl, inadequate public transportation, etc., none of which Boston, SF, Chicago, DC and - perhaps - Seattle suffer from (though LA is admittedly sketchy in the public transit area). I really do wish people would learn how to read.
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Old 12-16-2017, 09:10 PM
 
Location: Sydney Australia
597 posts, read 302,176 times
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Canberra, being a planned city, an inland city and a relatively cold city in winter, with occasional snow.
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Old 12-21-2017, 04:33 PM
 
9,064 posts, read 9,217,240 times
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Strangely enough sometimes the most unusual city in the country forms the foreign stereotype. Guadalajara with it's Mariachi culture is unusual in Mexico and Seville with it's ethnic Flamenco culture are the worldwide emblems of each prospective country while being thought of as relatively unique within Mexico and Spain.

Las Vegas is one of the most visited cities in the USA and is relatively unique. AFAIK Miami is the city in the world with the largest percentage of foreign born residents.
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Old 12-22-2017, 12:06 AM
 
Location: NYntarctica
11,258 posts, read 5,751,724 times
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Chile - Probably Santiago; much bigger than any other city in the country, and because of mass immigration it feels very diverse and different from the rest of Chile

Peru - The country is very diverse, so it's hard to say which one is "out of place". Maybe Iquitos? Isolated from the rest of the country and also shockingly expensive. Looking at the prices you would think you are in Argentina, not Peru
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Old 01-17-2018, 03:16 AM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
6,525 posts, read 11,614,071 times
Reputation: 3943
New York is probably the most out of place American city, followed closely by Miami and Las Vegas (if you count major metro areas only, if not then there's Key West, the Rio Grande Valley and parts of Hawaii too).

Cancun is the most atypical place in Mexico.
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