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Old 01-03-2018, 08:32 AM
 
2,564 posts, read 3,560,485 times
Reputation: 2939

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Of the major cities I've lived in:

Atlanta C
Unfortunately MARTA rail is very limited and the bus system can be confusing. It's really a shame that a city built by railroads doesn't have a commuter rail system as well.

New York City B-
The MTA has the potential to be amazing but it has been sliding for the past few years. On a recent visit to Manhattan I waited way too long for trains and I was reminded how miserable commuting in the the summer can be as some of the stations in lower Manhattan becoming stinking saunas. On a positive note coverage is comprehensive and runs around the clock.

Washington D.C. C-
It's pretty shameful that our national capital has to settle for the poor excuse of a transit system that is WMATA. I really am a little embarrassed for international visitors. When in lived there I experienced frequent service disruptions and incredibly rude employees all for the outrageous price of admission. Add to that the gloomiest metro stations I've yet been in. The escalator situation was a complete joke as well.

Moscow, Russia A
Moscow's Metro is by far the best I have used. Even the escalators seem to move faster than the DC metro's trains and they all seem to work. I very rarely had to wait more than 2 minutes for a train and I've never seen anyone rush to catch a train. The layout of the system is brilliant and offers pretty thorough coverage of a huge sprawling city. There is a huge new outer ring built on old train lines that makes it even more comprehensive. Buses seemed to have fallen off a bit during my time there but were still more reliable than most other places. I used taxis regularly for a couple months and had mostly positive experiences.
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Old 01-03-2018, 08:53 AM
 
30,101 posts, read 30,890,036 times
Reputation: 13843
Quote:
Originally Posted by DTL3000 View Post

New York City B-
The MTA has the potential to be amazing but it has been sliding for the past few years. On a recent visit to Manhattan I waited way too long for trains and I was reminded how miserable commuting in the the summer can be as some of the stations in lower Manhattan becoming stinking saunas. On a positive note coverage is comprehensive and runs around the clock.
I would give the NYC MTA a B+/A- considering that it is one of the oldest subway systems in the world but it runs 24/7 and gives one access to most areas of the city. There is also a relative good bus service in Manhattan and buses also cover areas outside of Manhattan particularly in areas that are not near subway stations. Also there is a good network of commuter trains (LIRR, MetroNorth & NJ Transit) that connect between Manhattan and the suburbs around the city.

Quite a while back I lived in San Francisco Bay Area (and for a while within San Francisco itself) and found the public transportation to be good but not as good as NYC as it didn't run 24/7. Mainly I used the BART commuter trains which were on time and clean and relatively safe at the time. Taking the cable cars near where I lived in SF was always nice. But I don't know if that is still the case.

I worked temporarily in Jinan (the capital of Shandong Province), China a few years ago. I found the bus system there to be very comprehensive but the buses didn't seem to run very late.

Last edited by Chava61; 01-03-2018 at 09:01 AM..
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Old 01-03-2018, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Taipei, Taiwan
6,508 posts, read 4,602,762 times
Reputation: 4244
It's fine. Probably better than all the above-mentioned ones though.
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Old 01-03-2018, 01:21 PM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston
33,181 posts, read 51,122,199 times
Reputation: 82123
Much to desire. Main AND preferred transportation is still a personal vehicle.
Traffic congestion in major Texas cities is notorious and continues to worsen. Although increased rail lines and bus routes may benefit these areas, only a small percentage of the population in the greater metropolitan region lives in them. However, the lack of density makes it very inefficient to run fixed-route transit systems that can cover entire cities. Advances in transportation have not kept up with the rates at which people have moved further from the urban cores of Texas’ expanding cities.
The only really dependable on-demand, to-your-door, public transportation system is the yellow school bus.
Austin and Dallas have probably best public transportation in Texas.
Houston:
https://www.visithoustontexas.com/tr...round-houston/

We have some ride sharing companies to provide on-demand public transit, as well as so-called first- and last-mile connections to transit services. (Uber, Pickup). Other than that: buses, LightRail, taxis, bikes...
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Old 01-03-2018, 02:02 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
11,110 posts, read 7,666,947 times
Reputation: 6143
I rate it a B+ mainly because it's constantly improving.

We have one transit authority for the whole lower mainland. Translink.

It consists of buses, both electric trolley and diesel and hybrid diesel/electric, Seabuses that go to the North Shore, Skytrain which is separate graded system, above and below ground. One large commuter train that comes from Mission into downtown Vancouver, called The Westcoast Express. Separate fare system.

They are also testing new double decker buses for some routes.

Current system of fares is by zones. There are 3 zones. This is currently under revue. Since the introduction of the Compass Card, paying fares is automatically calculated. Swipe in then out, card is deducted accordingly.
HOWEVER! They decided, not sure why, that when you buy a cash fare on a bus, it doesn't give you a compass ticket. So you can't transfer to the Skytrain or the Seabus. However you can tap in with your compass card on buses, and transfer FROM Skytrain and the Seabus. So they made buses one zone. Great if your trip is to be done all on bus. You save money.

https://www.translink.ca/Fares-and-P...gle-Fares.aspx

The other thing I like is that no matter how you've paid your fare, you can transfer in any direction for 90 minutes. So for short trips and quick errands, I pay one fare if I can get it done in that time.

Also all Skytrain routes are driverless. Longest driverless system in the world I believe.

Downtown is served well, by transit. Outlying areas have some spots where people complain. People like Skytrain and want more lines. An extension was just built, and talk of another heading out to UBC.

For the most part, transit is clean and safe. Of course every city has their nut jobs, and some seem to like taking transit.

Some videos...try and stay awake


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j3aIEco1rgA


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5YvAXmGJGeU


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=faQPTR2LrHE
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Old 01-03-2018, 05:02 PM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
2,001 posts, read 737,178 times
Reputation: 4053
Quote:
Originally Posted by elnina View Post
Much to desire. Main AND preferred transportation is still a personal vehicle.
Traffic congestion in major Texas cities is notorious and continues to worsen. Although increased rail lines and bus routes may benefit these areas, only a small percentage of the population in the greater metropolitan region lives in them. However, the lack of density makes it very inefficient to run fixed-route transit systems that can cover entire cities. Advances in transportation have not kept up with the rates at which people have moved further from the urban cores of Texas’ expanding cities.
The only really dependable on-demand, to-your-door, public transportation system is the yellow school bus.
Austin and Dallas have probably best public transportation in Texas.
Houston:
https://www.visithoustontexas.com/tr...round-houston/

We have some ride sharing companies to provide on-demand public transit, as well as so-called first- and last-mile connections to transit services. (Uber, Pickup). Other than that: buses, LightRail, taxis, bikes...
Not sure which city your comments refer to. But Houston is, I believe, the only major US city with free transit for all seniors over 70. Free across the board, seniors get the same digital passcard that can be bought by others, but never have to pay for it. My limited experience on the Houston bus is that the riding experience is pleasant, with comfortable buses and helpful, cheerful drivers, and there is a bus stop right at the gate at Houston airport.

BTW, churches in Texas also have very reliable old buses to pick children up for Sunday School.

Last edited by cebuan; 01-03-2018 at 05:32 PM..
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Old 01-04-2018, 07:26 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
6,772 posts, read 3,042,638 times
Reputation: 2194
For Melbourne:

Rental bikes: There are many stations around the inner city with plenty of trails and helmet vending machines bc of the stupid laws.

Buses: Lots of routes which cover a great majority of the metro area. There is one BRT (in development) and services increase in frequency as you get closer to the city. Some outer suburbs (doncaster, rowville) have more services because of the lack of rail.

Trams: Largest network in the world. Very frequent, clean, and probably the most well run type of PT here. Also the most modern, they will be run on solar power in 2 years time.

Trains: Fairly extensive network, which integrates metropolitan and some regional/intercity services. Metro services are ok, delays can be experienced a lot but hopefully the new Metro development/upgraded signalling will alleviate this (it should)
Melbourne-Geelong services are pretty good too, going every 15-20 mins in peak hour. Most other regional cities (Bendigo, Ballarat, Traralgon) have hourly services and then feeder buses. Longer train services to places like Shepparton, Albury, Swan Hill and even Sydney depart from Southern Cross station in the city and are more comfortable due to longer travel times.

Taxis/Uber: Taxis are ****ing terrible and too expensive. Uber is easily the better option here.

Port Melbourne: Where the Victoria-Tasmania cruise liner departs once/twice a day.
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Old 01-04-2018, 07:51 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
15,511 posts, read 18,006,350 times
Reputation: 10967
Quote:
Originally Posted by DTL3000 View Post
Washington D.C. C-
It's pretty shameful that our national capital has to settle for the poor excuse of a transit system that is WMATA. I really am a little embarrassed for international visitors. When in lived there I experienced frequent service disruptions and incredibly rude employees all for the outrageous price of admission. Add to that the gloomiest metro stations I've yet been in. The escalator situation was a complete joke as well.
It's true that there are often delays on the DC metro. That's the major problem that needs fixing. And the trains get overcrowded during peak time and special events. It has the second highest ridership in the U.S. after New York City.

But the system has gotten new trains in the last couple of years and those are nice and equipped with new technology. A lot of people like the Brutalist architecture of the metro stations. It actually won an award a few years ago. And I haven't seen too many problems with the escalators. For the most part, they work fine.
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Old 01-07-2018, 08:19 AM
 
3,388 posts, read 8,423,144 times
Reputation: 1897
Quote:
Originally Posted by DTL3000 View Post
Of the major cities I've lived in:

Atlanta C
Unfortunately MARTA rail is very limited and the bus system can be confusing. It's really a shame that a city built by railroads doesn't have a commuter rail system as well.

New York City B-
The MTA has the potential to be amazing but it has been sliding for the past few years. On a recent visit to Manhattan I waited way too long for trains and I was reminded how miserable commuting in the the summer can be as some of the stations in lower Manhattan becoming stinking saunas. On a positive note coverage is comprehensive and runs around the clock.

Washington D.C. C-
It's pretty shameful that our national capital has to settle for the poor excuse of a transit system that is WMATA. I really am a little embarrassed for international visitors. When in lived there I experienced frequent service disruptions and incredibly rude employees all for the outrageous price of admission. Add to that the gloomiest metro stations I've yet been in. The escalator situation was a complete joke as well.

Moscow, Russia A
Moscow's Metro is by far the best I have used. Even the escalators seem to move faster than the DC metro's trains and they all seem to work. I very rarely had to wait more than 2 minutes for a train and I've never seen anyone rush to catch a train. The layout of the system is brilliant and offers pretty thorough coverage of a huge sprawling city. There is a huge new outer ring built on old train lines that makes it even more comprehensive. Buses seemed to have fallen off a bit during my time there but were still more reliable than most other places. I used taxis regularly for a couple months and had mostly positive experiences.
I live in Atlanta and I agree. It's one of the few American cities that does not have commuter rail to the suburban areas. But many American cities do not have heavy rail like the MARTA. Fortunately I live close to a MARTA station so it's actually convenient. I'm surprised you rated Atlanta higher than DC.

Other cities I lived in:

Tokyo - A+. Hands down the best system in the world.

San Diego - C-. Trolley (light rail) is too slow and has limited coverage. Bus system not great either. But it does have commuter rail unlike Atlanta.

Jacksonville, FL - F. Almost non-existent. Never used the bus there. Only form of rail is a monorail in downtown.

Norfolk, VA - D. Has one light rail line (The Tide). Bus system was ok, for a city that size.

Catania, Italy - F. Might as well be non-existent. Unreliable af. Has 1 subway line which doesn't go anywhere useful.
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Old 01-08-2018, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Bologna, Italy
5,902 posts, read 2,985,091 times
Reputation: 2503
We only have buses here, and of course there's the regional train network.

The buses are ok but they're often full even if they are numerous and come at a high frequency. They're usually on time, but the drivers can be pretty crazy sometimes (ie driving too fast, not being careful at crossroads / roundabouts / etc). One cool thing is that we have night buses, after 1 am there's one bus per hour for the main lines, which is pretty cool for a city this size.

Bologna actually has traffic issues for a number of reasons, including the fact that the downtown is mostly from the middle age, and that there are very few connections between the various peripheral areas, therefore most buslines end up crossing the city center to go from one periphery to the other, creating chaos, especially because too many people keep on using their cars even for very short distances.

On weekends we have the T-days, the core downtown is closed to cars / buses / taxis and the firt periphery is choking with traffic. The idea is great but could be implemented better. Many people are angry because they can not park right in the center.

The train system is fine, delays usually happen when it snows, but otherwise it works.

We should have a tram system in the future (when ?), which will be a big improvement.
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