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Old 01-12-2018, 04:17 PM
pdw pdw started this thread
 
Location: Ontario, Canada
1,462 posts, read 1,844,341 times
Reputation: 827

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Quote:
Originally Posted by elnina View Post
What you posted is NOT a public housing, OP.
Those shacks/squatter settlements are unplanned and are often illegal. Houses are self-built using basic materials and shanty towns have few services.

Public housing is a housing provided for people with low incomes, subsidized by public funds. Such program established by government to provide housing for low-income families, disabled persons, and the elderly. These families or persons must meet certain eligibility requirements to participate in the program and may be required to pay a nominal amount of rent. The units are considered public because they are funded, owned, and administered by government authorities.
Read more: What is public housing? definition and meaning - BusinessDictionary.com

Squatter settlements/shanty towns are any collection of buildings where the people have no legal rights to the land they are built upon. The people are living there illegally and do not own the land. Their improvised housing, called shanties or shacks is made of plywood, corrugated metal, sheets of plastic, and cardboard boxes. They provide housing for many of the world's poorest people and offer basic shelter.
GCSE Urban environments
I know. I'm saying governments are demolishing public housing and replacing it with market housing all over the world. Sometimes they are replaced with mixed income communities which usually have less units than the original housing that was demolished. This makes the problem worse because it ends up displacing people.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scrat335 View Post
That's the way it's going. The only way we will change it is to have government compete with the housing industry. I don't like the idea but I sure as hell don't want kids growing up in shanty towns.
I just don't understand how in a couple of short decades housing has become one of the most precious resources in the world economy. What did this and why is it irreversible?
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarisaAnna View Post
The bulk of our public housing is detached housing and medium densityThe state government are selling off just a few properties in multi-million dollar locations and then can spend the money providing many more properties in average locations. Here most of the older properties are low density and the high density public housing does not yet need to be rebuilt.
This isn't just a few properties. Some cities have completely demolished all of their public housing, see Atlanta. These locations are worth millions of dollars now, but they weren't before. It's not fair to kick these people out of their homes as soon as they are worth something. Isn't it also fair to say that low income people would benefit from being closer to employment centres due to the cost of transportation?

But back on topic, I like how people have brought up the tent cities. These may be an "eyesore" annoying to many how have spent a lot of money on properties, but these places will continue to grow until the problem is dealt with. It is far more important that people are able to put a roof over their head than for the already upper middle class to make ridiculous returns from selling their house.
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Old 01-12-2018, 04:30 PM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston
33,138 posts, read 51,049,842 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pdw View Post
I just don't understand how in a couple of short decades housing has become one of the most precious resources in the world economy. What did this and why is it irreversible?
That's why:



There is only so much space to build new houses. And because it's shrinking rapidly, real estate became very expensive.

Irreversible? How? It's pretty much unstoppable.
The population of Africa is increasing rapidly. From an estimated 140 million in 1900, it had grown to a billion by 2010. The population of Africa is increasing because births outnumber deaths 4:1.
Even if African fertility were to fall right now to the level in Europe and China (1.6 children per woman) – a highly unlikely scenario – the population would continue to increase for several decades, reaching 1.6 billion in 2050. This is because Africa has a very high proportion of young adults of reproductive age (15-49).
https://qz.com/1099546/population-gr...earth-by-2100/

Spoiler

http://www.eoi.es/blogs/carlosomarga...e-of-humanity/

The causes of poverty include changing trends in a country's economy, lack of education, high divorce rate which causes feminization of poverty, having a culture of poverty, overpopulation, epidemic diseases such as AIDS and malaria, and environmental problems such as lack of rainfall.

Despite the on-trend rhetoric and optimism, the chances of (all but) ending absolute poverty in our generation are slim. The chances of ending poverty altogether are zero.
https://www.theguardian.com/global-d...tic-inequality

Last edited by elnina; 01-12-2018 at 04:43 PM..
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Old 01-12-2018, 04:43 PM
pdw pdw started this thread
 
Location: Ontario, Canada
1,462 posts, read 1,844,341 times
Reputation: 827
Quote:
Originally Posted by elnina View Post
That's why:



There is only so much space to build new houses. And because it's shrinking rapidly, real estate became very expensive.

Irreversible? How? It's pretty much unstoppable.
The population of Africa is increasing rapidly. From an estimated 140 million in 1900, it had grown to a billion by 2010. The population of Africa is increasing because births outnumber deaths 4:1.
Even if African fertility were to fall right now to the level in Europe and China (1.6 children per woman) – a highly unlikely scenario – the population would continue to increase for several decades, reaching 1.6 billion in 2050. This is because Africa has a very high proportion of young adults of reproductive age (15-49).
https://qz.com/1099546/population-gr...earth-by-2100/


DP: Global Population Growth, an issue of humanity?
I know world population has gone up, but I don't think this explains it. It has not increased significantly in the areas most effected by this housing crisis, and it has not grown all that much since, say 2010, while the cost of a house has almost doubled in that time span in many locations.
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Old 01-12-2018, 04:48 PM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston
33,138 posts, read 51,049,842 times
Reputation: 82029
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdw View Post
I know world population has gone up, but I don't think this explains it. It has not increased significantly in the areas most effected by this housing crisis, and it has not grown all that much since, say 2010, while the cost of a house has almost doubled in that time span in many locations.
Because of demand, houses are bigger than decades ago, material and labor cost more, land to build became more expensive.
House prices rise much faster than wages, which means that houses become less and less affordable.
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Old 01-12-2018, 05:20 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, BC
9,595 posts, read 10,797,402 times
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The desirable locations have become a lot more expensive because more people are moving there than ever before and the cities can only expand so much in terms of single family housing and that is why you are seeing a lot more density in cities. I think there is a large disconnect between the housing market and the job market in a lot of places and that is a big part of the problem too. There is still plenty of land especially in places like Canada, Australia and the USA where people can build social housing in rural areas if that is a goal and it would be cheaper for the government too. I know if I was poor and had no job prospects, I would much rather live in a rural area and not an urban one.
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Old 01-12-2018, 06:40 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,186 posts, read 3,840,810 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elnina View Post
Because of demand, houses are bigger than decades ago, material and labor cost more, land to build became more expensive.
House prices rise much faster than wages, which means that houses become less and less affordable.
In certain Canadian cities, wealthy foreigners have driven up the price of real estate that even wealthy local people can't afford homes.
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Old 01-13-2018, 06:22 PM
 
Location: Finland
24,268 posts, read 17,250,472 times
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In the EU, I can't see this as a problem. The housing costs are going up only a bit faster than the wages, and Eurostat says that 11% of EU citizens housing are living with an "excessive burden" meaning that rent + utilities take more than 40% their income. The lowest percentage is on Malta (1.1%) and the highest in Greece (40.9%), which is messed up on so many levels. And the OP said, the density of most European cities is actually rising, as millennials don't want a picket-fenced detached home.

And considering that all Western European countries except Switzerland and Iceland are welfare states, I simply don't see shantytowns as realistic. Even remotely.
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Old 01-14-2018, 11:34 PM
pdw pdw started this thread
 
Location: Ontario, Canada
1,462 posts, read 1,844,341 times
Reputation: 827
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ariete View Post
In the EU, I can't see this as a problem. The housing costs are going up only a bit faster than the wages, and Eurostat says that 11% of EU citizens housing are living with an "excessive burden" meaning that rent + utilities take more than 40% their income. The lowest percentage is on Malta (1.1%) and the highest in Greece (40.9%), which is messed up on so many levels. And the OP said, the density of most European cities is actually rising, as millennials don't want a picket-fenced detached home.

And considering that all Western European countries except Switzerland and Iceland are welfare states, I simply don't see shantytowns as realistic. Even remotely.
The EU is lucky for not suffering from the "condo problem" that we're experiencing here in Canada. In Toronto and Vancouver, the vacancy rates for rental units is only around 1, so for every 100 units only 1 is vacant. It is a battle to find a place to rent, and it is not unheard of for people to be found homeless simply because of this. It's been unheard of for well-employed people to be unable to find housing until now.
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Old 01-15-2018, 07:35 AM
 
4,454 posts, read 5,433,815 times
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Shanty towns exist in Western Countries

Such as this in London:
Let’s stop pretending that a shanty town in London is a big surprise - Telegraph

The city of lights: Paris

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xmUSYg_yD48

Rome shanty town: Pope visits Rome Shanty town:
Pope Francis Makes Surprise Visit To Rome Shantytown

Germany shanty town:
https://sites.google.com/a/richland2...es-shantytowns

Shanty towns exist in Sweden:
https://www.thelocal.se/20150928/pol...st-shanty-camp

Spain shanty town:
https://www.gettyimages.com.au/event...re-id156364503

Spain shanty town:


Detroit shanty town:
https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Oc0JiLtDt...0/detroit1.jpg
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Old 01-15-2018, 08:50 AM
 
Location: Canada
4,186 posts, read 3,840,810 times
Reputation: 2858
That last pic is not detroit. lol
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