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Old 01-25-2018, 12:50 PM
 
Location: Chicago
2,357 posts, read 2,016,629 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hertfordshire View Post
The shopping experience in NYC is unlike any other in the US. If they were trying to compare UK shopping to US shopping, they went about it all wrong.
Agreed. Here in Chicago, we have full sized grocery stores in even the most in-demand neighborhoods. Sometimes multiple stores within walking distance even. That's also not counting smaller convenience stores. Due to that, I can't say my grocery shopping experience is even remotely close to being like the one in that article for NYC.

The author didn't want to compare countries. All they wanted to do was compare NYC (city only) and London.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brave New World View Post
I should imagine the US has a similar ranking according to type of shop, location, size and quality.

Any one want to make a similar US list.
It would be impossible to do so since there are only a handful of stores that are actually nationwide and advertise themselves as such. You'll find many metropolitan areas are still dominated by regionally specific stores and or former regional chains that have been bought out by larger corporations. Those chains that get bought out usually keep their regional branding and are still only in a specific area. For example, Jewel here in Chicago is owned by Albertsons, but you're not going to see Jewel stores outside of Chicagoland and the region immediately adjacent to metropolitan Chicago.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brave New World View Post
Not sure about the laws preventing the buying of wine in a NYC Grocery Store.

The UK has quite a few 24 hour and late night grocery shops in major cities, and many are well stocked, and there are also apps which promise you delivery in the hour.
It's useless to compare New York State's laws on alcohol with that of the entirety of the UK. Alcohol laws are state specific, and some states have further let their own municipalities handle them as they wish. Here in Illinois I can buy alcohol virtually everywhere any day of the week, including at gas stations. The time of day at which you can buy alcohol from these establishments is regulated, however. For example, I can't buy booze from a 24 hour grocery store if it's after 2 am here and instead I would have to wait until 8 am to do so again.
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Old 01-25-2018, 06:06 PM
 
Location: Washington State
15,406 posts, read 8,059,468 times
Reputation: 13202
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
How popular are warehouse, buy-in-bulk grocery stores like Costco in other countries?
I've been to the Costco in Seoul a few times...unbelievably popular, you wouldn't believe how many people shop there on the weekends.
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Old 01-25-2018, 10:09 PM
 
2,564 posts, read 3,590,083 times
Reputation: 2950
US. No contest. The Kroger in the small rather backwater town near where I grew up is on par with some of the most luxurious markets I've seen overseas. You also have an huge variety of places to choose from from Aldi to Whole Foods to upscale specialty groceries.

The standard of living across the board in the US is still light years ahead of all but the wealthiest parts of Europe.
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Old 01-26-2018, 04:11 AM
 
Location: Asia
2,761 posts, read 986,033 times
Reputation: 2979
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
I've shopped at Albert Heijn and never felt disgusted. Some stores are small, but they had everything I was looking for.
I don't doubt what you say.

But, my experience is different.

My last trip to A'Dam I hit Albert Heijn store behind the palace. It was a mess and there was not much variety. Very little fresh produce, too.

Compared to the major chain grocery store where I visit in the US... well, there is no comparison. Only contrast.
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Old 01-26-2018, 04:22 AM
 
Location: Taipei, Taiwan
6,551 posts, read 4,695,845 times
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^The big ones would be better.
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Old 01-26-2018, 04:26 AM
 
599 posts, read 254,126 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dtl3000 View Post
us. No contest. The kroger in the small rather backwater town near where i grew up is on par with some of the most luxurious markets i've seen overseas. You also have an huge variety of places to choose from from aldi to whole foods to upscale specialty groceries.

The standard of living across the board in the us is still light years ahead of all but the wealthiest parts of europe.
wrong!
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Old 01-26-2018, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
9,620 posts, read 12,804,020 times
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My wife (Chinese) was amazed at the supermarkets in America when we went in October. She was blown away by the selection, quality, cleanliness, attentiveness of staff, etc versus a Chinese or Thai supermarket (the only other country she’s been to). There are higher-end supermarkets in China owned by Tesco called Ole that are copying the UK/rest-of-US style format, and it’s growing in popularity.

Between the US and UK, I didn’t see too much of a difference between suburban or urban chain supermarkets between the two. The NYC supermarkets they describe are closer to ParknShop, Market Place, or City Super in Hong Kong... limited space, high prices, not much fresh stuff and what is fresh, is expensive.
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Old 01-26-2018, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
11,411 posts, read 7,860,490 times
Reputation: 6483
Quote:
Originally Posted by DTL3000 View Post
US. No contest. The Kroger in the small rather backwater town near where I grew up is on par with some of the most luxurious markets I've seen overseas. You also have an huge variety of places to choose from from Aldi to Whole Foods to upscale specialty groceries.

The standard of living across the board in the US is still light years ahead of all but the wealthiest parts of Europe.
This isn't just about Europe, although I totally disagree with your point about the US being light years ahead of Europe.

Europe has markets that the high end US retailers copy. Just check a high end cheese section in a US market...copied right out of Europe IMO. It has to be a high end store, because your regular grocery stores cheese sections are usually lacking compared to Europe, or even Canada.
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Old 01-26-2018, 01:11 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
11,411 posts, read 7,860,490 times
Reputation: 6483
Quote:
Originally Posted by Salmonburgher View Post
I don't doubt what you say.

But, my experience is different.

My last trip to A'Dam I hit Albert Heijn store behind the palace. It was a mess and there was not much variety. Very little fresh produce, too.

Compared to the major chain grocery store where I visit in the US... well, there is no comparison. Only contrast.
Ya...but painting all of Amsterdam's grocery shopping by going to one AH in a very touristy area, may not be the best way to judge.
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Old 01-26-2018, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
11,411 posts, read 7,860,490 times
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A lot of this of course is personal experience, and everyone when shopping expects certain things, or are used to certain things.

Since it changes by regions as well, different stores will carry different items. When I am grocery shopping in Washington State ( usually for a camping trip ) in a regular grocery store, the things that I don't find makes ME feel that the store isn't as good. Of course a local will be perfectly happy with their store, because their shopping habits and expectations are different. I found this while shopping at Ralph's in Palm Spring last year as well.

Things that I notice in those US stores. Remember these are large chain stores, in comparison to my large chain, like Save On Foods here in BC

Baked goods. Truly good bread. Anything I've bought that looks " artesenal " was disappointing. Baguettes, forget it. Doughy and nothing like a real baguette.

Cheeses. I've noticed more imported cheeses in US stores, but still nowhere the selection I can get at a regular store at home.

Certain meat items like European Wieners. Very common here in Vancouver, and my preferred camping dog

...and of course...looking for the NO HORMONE dairy products is a hassle.

Indian food. We have a huge variety here in BC.


Now remember this is only about a few stores and my experiences with them. I have been to some wonderful grocery stores in the US. One in Portland is especially nice

https://www.zupans.com

There are many of these types of stores in the US, as in Canada. Our Urban Fare is similar here in BC.

https://www.urbanfare.com/home

One should also remember that these higher end grocery stores in the US and Canada, took a more EUROPEAN attitude towards shopping, than normal.
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