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Old 02-13-2018, 03:46 AM
 
Location: Sydney Australia
597 posts, read 241,083 times
Reputation: 838

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Would anyone else really want to join us? They might inherit Barnaby Joyce!
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Old 02-13-2018, 05:12 AM
 
6,529 posts, read 7,085,859 times
Reputation: 3989
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakery Hill View Post
Most Aussies find British slang and colloquialisms quite difficult to understand, similarly a lot of British accents.
wasnt referring to slang but canadians use the same terms as americans for most things where as aussies use british terms to describe most everyday things

think of the way the word garage is pronounced , canadians use the american pronunciation , aussies use the british variant

tonnes of other examples

us irish use the english variant more than anyone , only learned recently that in australia and new zealand the word lorry is not used , its truck like in the usa
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Old 02-13-2018, 05:38 AM
 
Location: Brisbane
3,257 posts, read 4,950,138 times
Reputation: 2618
Quote:
Originally Posted by irish_bob View Post
wasnt referring to slang but canadians use the same terms as americans for most things where as aussies use british terms to describe most everyday things

think of the way the word garage is pronounced , canadians use the american pronunciation , aussies use the british variant

tonnes of other examples

us irish use the english variant more than anyone , only learned recently that in australia and new zealand the word lorry is not used , its truck like in the usa
Two that really stuck out for me were courgette (zucchini) and aubergine (egg plant). The first time i heard those words i had absolutely no idea what they were.
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Old 02-13-2018, 07:55 AM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
15,953 posts, read 20,594,950 times
Reputation: 8149
Quote:
Originally Posted by easthome View Post
Not just language but popular culture, and popular culture causes a strong bond, half the actors/actresses in American movies or TV are British and half the actors/actresses in UK movies are American! Most American initially assumed Ibris Elba or Hugh Laurie were American, we still don't even know if Gillian Anderson is a Brit or an American! As for musically has there ever been two countries share popular music with each other like Americans and Brits? Watch Graham Norton and half his guests are Americans the Late Show anchor man is British, every super hero in film seems to be played by a British actor! Most UK and American TV or film stars have places they live both sides of the Atlantic and the Broadway shows flit across the Atlantic to the West End. The Americans are even trying to set up THE most American of American culture the NFL in the UK! Yes of course there are differences but I suggest that anybody that thinks the UK and US don't share aspects of culture aren't looking very hard.
LOL She was born in Chicago but lives in London. We even have reporters and some anchors on news networks who are British in the US. Let's not forget the Canadians. I don't know about the UK but in the US, many actors and news anchors are Canadian.
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Old 02-13-2018, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Vancouver, BC
9,303 posts, read 10,283,914 times
Reputation: 3784
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarisaAnna View Post
Would anyone else really want to join us? They might inherit Barnaby Joyce!
I would be there in a heartbeat if I could... I absolutely adore the Aussie surf/beach culture scene which we sadly lack in Canada
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Old 02-13-2018, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
10,006 posts, read 7,042,731 times
Reputation: 5445
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakery Hill View Post
Not really. Itís just that Australia and the UK are both different than the US and Canada so youíre not really attuned to the differences between them. Spend more time in both and youíll get a better idea of how different they really are. My first impression of Canada was that it was very ďBritishĒ in character, particularly people and apparent social norms, but that of course was just an initial impression heightened by time in the US immediately before hand that faded.
I've heard similar. People who have never been to Canada or the US come with preconceive ideas naturally. If they first land in Canada they thinks it's very much like the US. Then they go to the US and notice the differences. One traveller's report I read, said they really noticed the differences when then re-entered Canada again on the same trip from the US.

Of course, a lot of this depends on where they were in Canada, and where they were in the US.
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Old 02-13-2018, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
10,006 posts, read 7,042,731 times
Reputation: 5445
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dangerous-Boy View Post
I am against monarchies.

Pro-republic!

I feel the US should be the center of the commonwealth. We should have english language standardization because it bothers me that color and colour are spelled differently.

Also, if the UK became a secular republic, Ireland should rejoin a united republic of great britain.

Canada should be annexed and the french part should speak english.

e pluribus unum!
Why that's just plain UN-CANADIAN!
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Old 02-13-2018, 11:02 AM
 
Location: Tulsa
1,071 posts, read 388,096 times
Reputation: 1013
What about Ireland?
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Old 02-13-2018, 11:10 AM
 
Location: Vancouver, BC
9,303 posts, read 10,283,914 times
Reputation: 3784
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoodHombre View Post
What about Ireland?
Ireland is part of the EU and they want to stay in that bloc and are thus not interested in CANZUK.
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Old 02-13-2018, 11:17 AM
 
Location: Tulsa
1,071 posts, read 388,096 times
Reputation: 1013
Quote:
Originally Posted by deneb78 View Post
Ireland is part of the EU and they want to stay in that bloc and are thus not interested in CANZUK.
I mean, isnít ireland part of anglesphere? Donít they speak English?
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